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Old 01-31-2011, 07:56 AM   #1
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Red Wine sauce? (Pheasant)

Hi all,

I have a phesant I want to cook. I'm probably just going to cook the breast and throw the rest away.

However, I would like some advice on the sauce.

I'm thinking of cooking the phesant (either pan fry or roast in the over).
I was then going to put some red wine in a pot, and bring to the boil before reducing to a simmer. Add some finely chopped onion, spinach and mushroom.

Let that reduce down a bit and use it as my sauce.

Also goign to cook some mash.

Any other ideas what I can do? Just trying to use up what I have in the fridge, also the first time I have cooked phesant!

Thanks
Amnesia

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Old 01-31-2011, 02:37 PM   #2
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Red wine and poultry. How about instead of coq au vin, pheasant au vin? Then you don't have to throw away the "rest".

Craig
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Old 01-31-2011, 03:55 PM   #3
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Quote:
I'm probably just going to cook the breast and throw the rest away.
Why on earth would you do that?

I would roast it whole, pretty much as you would a chicken, but because it is so lean, I would wrap it with bacon to keep it moist. I might also tent it with aluminum foil, or put it over the breast until the last 20 minutes, so that won't become overcooked. I would put a couple of garlic cloves and a sprig of thyme inside the cavity, along with maybe some chopped up celery to lend moisture.

You should end up with brown bits in the roasting pan, and a small amount of pan juices. I'd use those to start the sauce, add some red wine to deglaze the pan and reduce it down. Finish with a chunk of butter, for a creamy finish.

Serve with a pilau of brown and wild rice with mushrooms. Soooooooo good!
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Old 01-31-2011, 03:56 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
Red wine and poultry. How about instead of coq au vin, pheasant au vin? Then you don't have to throw away the "rest".

Craig
Craig, Pheasant is too lean a bird to stew. The results would be unpleasant.
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Old 01-31-2011, 04:07 PM   #5
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Oh, I thought that coq au vin was made using a braising technique. Basically cooked until it falls off the bone.

Craig
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Old 02-01-2011, 10:26 AM   #6
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Thanks for all the replies.

Unfortunately, we cut the bird before I read these replies.

Are there any good pan fry recipes? We've got the legs/thighs, breast cut and a thick bit from the top. The only thing left is the carcass and the live was inside too. I wanted to take care that we did not waste the bird, and the meat is now sat in various tubs in the fridge.

I'm no chef, so please excuse my ignorance with proper cooking terms.
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Old 02-01-2011, 10:31 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
Oh, I thought that coq au vin was made using a braising technique. Basically cooked until it falls off the bone.

Craig
Coq au vin is a braised dish, and best made with an old bird. But lean meats (and pheasant is one) do not take well to braising.
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Old 02-01-2011, 02:55 PM   #8
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Coq au vin is a braised dish, and best made with an old bird. But lean meats (and pheasant is one) do not take well to braising.
I guess that the recipes I saw when I googled pheasant au vin are not good, including Julia Childs suggestion?

Craig
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Old 02-01-2011, 03:08 PM   #9
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Quote:
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I guess that the recipes I saw when I googled pheasant au vin are not good, including Julia Childs suggestion?

Craig
Craig, I have never known Julia Child to use pheasant for her coq au vin recipe, she strickly used (as CJ said) an old bird... The meat on them is not as tender as a young chicken, so it makes them perfect for braising... I suppose you could try it with a pheasant, however I would take it out of the braising liquid way ahead of the time it takes, and then put the pieces back in the last few minutes...
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Old 02-01-2011, 03:36 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Mimizkitchen View Post
Craig, I have never known Julia Child to use pheasant for her coq au vin recipe, she strickly used (as CJ said) an old bird... The meat on them is not as tender as a young chicken, so it makes them perfect for braising... I suppose you could try it with a pheasant, however I would take it out of the braising liquid way ahead of the time it takes, and then put the pieces back in the last few minutes...
I didn't say she used it, just that she mentioned it as a possible sub. I understand that old birds and roosters are used and that their use were the origions of the dish.

I was just making a suggestion without even knowing if anyone actually used pheasant in this fashion. The reply I got seemed to dismiss my suggestion out of hand. That made me curious and I looked into it. Apparantly people do make pheasant in this fashion and with good results. Just saying. Some one had to be the first to try an oyster.

Craig
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