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Old 02-07-2009, 01:50 PM   #1
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reducing bouilion, but not cooking it?

Hi all,

I understand that boulion should not be cooked. An occasional bubble is OK. But no real bubbles, like with cooking, right?

If this is correct, how do I reduce the volume of my boulion? My pan is a 14 liter soup pan (+/- 3 gallon). If I let it simmer like boulion should (just below "full on" cooking) it doesn't really reduce. I tried 10 hours and only evaporated about 1 liter of water.

Can anyone advice me on this please?



thanks in advance!
cheers,
LateStart

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Old 02-08-2009, 05:13 PM   #2
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All I can say is it just takes time. And yes, you want it to simmer slightly, but not boil. What you call "bouilion" we call stock. There can be chicken stock, beef stock, vegetable stock, seafood stock, etc.

Maybe you don't have the heat up high enough? You aren't covering the pot, right? You don't want to cover the pot. It also may just take more time than 10 hours. Also, the size of your gas flame may be too small. It may need a burner with more heat output.

Just an unasked for tip - any foam that comes to the top gently remove with a spoon and throw away. This is just dirt and debris that will cloud your broth/stock if not removed.
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Old 02-08-2009, 05:22 PM   #3
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When i make broth, I strain it a couple time, then boil it down to about 1/4 the original volume and freeze it in ice cubes. I can't tell a discernible difference between the original and reduced and reconstituted versions. Boiling after the fact doesn't seem to matter.
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Old 02-08-2009, 05:40 PM   #4
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When you say "reduced and reconstituted" versions are you saying that you reduce it down and then when you want to use it you add water?
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Old 02-08-2009, 07:59 PM   #5
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I make the broth as normal. Then I boil it down to 1/4 the original volume, i.e. 1 gallon is reduced to 1 quart. Then, I pour it into ice cube trays. Each cube is 2 tbs. I put the cube in a cup with enough boiling water to make 1/2 cup.
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Old 02-09-2009, 02:48 AM   #6
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So actually you are boiling down your broth and still you don't taste much difference Kitchenelf? Sounds good. Goes a lot faster then simmering.
Do you think it is important to strain it several times? (I strain it once). Do you think the broth get's clearer and because of that it's taste is better?

What actually happens to the taste if a stock or broth is clouded? Can someone tell me?

thanks!

btw.: the flame is big enough to get it boiling, no problem :)
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Old 02-09-2009, 10:56 AM   #7
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Never actually boil your stock. It will become cloudy and very hard to degrease, as the oil will emulsify. No amount of straining will help it.

Simmer it gently.
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Old 02-09-2009, 11:31 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
Never actually boil your stock. It will become cloudy and very hard to degrease, as the oil will emulsify. No amount of straining will help it.

Simmer it gently.
I just noticed an important distinction. I make vegetable broth. There very little fat and none saturated. There is no gelatin from bones. The only starch would be from potatoes and squash. I've been talking broth and you all have been talking stock.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LateStart View Post
Do you think it is important to strain it several times? (I strain it once). Do you think the broth get's clearer and because of that it's taste is better?
The first time, I get as much moisture out as possible by pressing everything against a colander. The second time, I press it through a strainer. Since I've already dirtied two pots, I add a piece of cheese cloth to the strainer for a third time. The last time probably doesn't do much, but it makes me feel better.
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Old 02-09-2009, 01:09 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
Never actually boil your stock. It will become cloudy and very hard to degrease, as the oil will emulsify. No amount of straining will help it.

Simmer it gently.
Could one say that boiling and stirring makes the grease emulsify and that's what makes the taste of stock less pleasant? Would that be the main reason for not wanting your stock to get cloudy? (provided that the foam is removed in the earlier stages.)

btw.: one nut case can ask more questions then ten nut cases can answer... So just asking. I am not expecting a valid answer every time I ask something :). I really always do appreciate any input at all.
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Old 02-09-2009, 01:13 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LateStart View Post
Could one say that boiling and stirring makes the grease emulsify and that's what makes the taste of stock less pleasant? Would that be the main reason for not wanting your stock to get cloudy? (provided that the foam is removed in the earlier stages.)

btw.: one nut case can ask more questions then ten nut cases can answer... So just asking. I am not expecting a valid answer every time I ask something :). I really always do appreciate any input at all.
Yes. Boiling makes it next to impossible to eliminate the particulates that make the broth/stock cloudy, as well. It's just too much agitation. Plus, boiling really doesn't speed up the process much, anyway.
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