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Old 12-08-2015, 09:08 AM   #1
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Rendering and combining fats

I have only ever seen rendered fat from meat as a single type, for example, it's all pork or all beef. Never mixed. I was wondering if anyone could answer why and if it's possible (or desirable) to render down and mix different fats together.

Thanks for any info!

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Old 12-08-2015, 09:43 AM   #2
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Welcome to DC, UM.

Rendered fat is usually a by-product of cooked meat. Since you usually cook one type of meat at a time, you end up with one type of rendered fat.

Rendered fat from different animals will readily combine. I don't think there's much call for it though. Most don't save rendered fat except for bacon fat which is often used for cooking eggs etc. Some use chicken fat in certain recipes.
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Old 12-09-2015, 07:50 AM   #3
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Think 'meatloaf mix': raw ground beef with beef fat added, raw ground pork with pork fat added, raw ground veal with raw veal fat added.
Very common mix.
After the meatloaf is cooked any fat drippings are a mixture of rendered beef/pork/veal fats.
Personally I don't care much for the flavor of these drippings but love the resulting meatloaf.
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Old 12-09-2015, 09:50 AM   #4
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rendered fat

My mother had a can of Crisco and a Crisco can with a strainer top that I think was made for the purpose sitting on her stove. The drippings went into the strainer and the fat was reused. I don't recall her being particular about what type of fat was recycled.

I think that was fairly common prior to the availability of hundreds of types of fat at the local supermarket.
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Old 12-10-2015, 10:53 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigjim68 View Post
My mother had a can of Crisco and a Crisco can with a strainer top that I think was made for the purpose sitting on her stove. The drippings went into the strainer and the fat was reused. I don't recall her being particular about what type of fat was recycled.

I think that was fairly common prior to the availability of hundreds of types of fat at the local supermarket.
When I was a kid my mother also had a empty tin with a lid with holes in it. All the rendered fat from whatever she was cooking was strained into the tin then used then more rendered fat added. She stored it in the make-shift fridge which was a galvanised tub partly filled with cold water with chunks of ice added from the ice house with a wooden lid on top.
Pretty basic living. No running water. No electricity. Wood stove. No radio even until I was about six.
I'd go back to that way of living in a heartbeat.
All the rendered fat was from our chickens/geese and wild game. I remember she made the best fried potatoes I ever tasted using the rendered fat.
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Old 12-10-2015, 11:11 AM   #6
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Yup. Combined fats from different meats. Poured into a tin can. My mother also saved the fats. But then she was a child of the Depression. And she made the best biscuits with that fat. Along with home fries and fried eggs. And in spite of straining it, there would always be bits and pieces on the bottom. So when she reached that point of using the fats in the can to where you could see the bits and pieces, then she tossed that can and started a new can. I also remember her washing the fat. I wish I had paid more attention to what she was doing and how she did it.

BTW, welcome to DC. A fun place to be with lots of laughter and information for you to digest.
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Old 12-10-2015, 11:48 AM   #7
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You can still buy fancy grease keepers with a strainer in the top, similar to this one.

Food Savers & Storage Containers | Amazon.com

Bacon fat makes the best molasses cookies that you can ever imagine.

Old Fashioned Molasses Cookies
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Old 12-10-2015, 02:22 PM   #8
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Or you can buy a stainless steel one and keep it on the stove.
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Old 12-10-2015, 07:18 PM   #9
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I have this one sitting on the counter next to my stove.




Every once in a while you need to stick the lid and strainer in the dishwasher
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Old 12-10-2015, 07:37 PM   #10
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I used to have one. Don't know what happened to it. I put different fats in canning jars in the fridge.
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