"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-15-2012, 09:35 AM   #21
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,390
Quote:
Originally Posted by HistoricFoodie View Post
...As to your specific question, I wouldn't call it pan roasting at all. To me, the process you described is pan frying. The approach is to brown the chops in very little oil, then finish cooking them in the oven. If I were putting that dish on a menu, neither "baking" nor "roasting" would be part of the description...

Pan roasting is a recognized term for the process.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2012, 10:36 AM   #22
Head Chef
 
GLC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Near Austin, Texas
Posts: 1,216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
Could somebody please queue the Jaws (movie) theme song?

Mumu, if you roast it then it's roasted pork chops. If you bake it then it's baked pork chops. N'est-ce pas?
Funny, isn't it. Baked fish, but never roasted fish. I'm inclined to baked pork chops, because they are "pieces." But roast pork when they're not cut, not chopped.

Four and twenty blackbirds are baked in a pie but roasted individually.

(Have you ever seen how they actually did that blackbird pie thing and had the birds fly away when it was cut open?)

__________________

__________________
"Kitchen duty is awarded only to those of manifest excellence..." - The Master, Dogen
GLC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2012, 10:48 AM   #23
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,277
Quote:
Originally Posted by HistoricFoodie View Post
Mumu, you're definately overthinking this.
.

And underlistening to excellent and complete answers
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2012, 12:32 PM   #24
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
Quote:
Originally Posted by GLC View Post
(Have you ever seen how they actually did that blackbird pie thing and had the birds fly away when it was cut open?)

No, but I like the picture!

Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
And underlistening to excellent and complete answers
Perhaps there's a reason for that.
__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2012, 01:53 PM   #25
The Dude Abides
 
TATTRAT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Bermuda Native in D.C./NoVA
Posts: 5,324
Send a message via AIM to TATTRAT Send a message via Yahoo to TATTRAT Send a message via Skype™ to TATTRAT
Also, and forgive me if I missed it already, but roasting typically means that the food is also OFF the bottom of the pan, and air is allowed all around the 'roast', be it by a v-rack, or a bed of course cut vegetables.
__________________
flickr
TATTRAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2012, 02:03 PM   #26
Head Chef
 
GLC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Near Austin, Texas
Posts: 1,216
Live blackbird pie:

From surviving instructions, it sounds like they built a typically very heavy pie crust and top filled with flour that they later removed through a hole in the bottom and inserted the birds through the hole.

Sixteenth century pastry chefs apparently had to be especially creative to make things like the combination of pastry warship and pastry castle, both with pastry cannons charged with real gunpowder that could be set off by lighting powder trains so that they fire on each other. On the same table, a pastry stag has an arrow through it so that the ladies can be invited to withdraw the arrow and upon doing so, the red wine inside the stag "bleeds." And the whole setup flanked by pies, one with live birds, another with live frogs. It seems to have been popular to have begun formal dinners with chaos and screaming, especially as the candles were placed so that the birds would put them out in flying away, making the frog thing even more exciting in the dark.

Maybe they were afraid that they otherwise wouldn't have anything to talk about over dinner.

(Actually, the original description says to make the guns of "kickses." I have no idea what kickses are, or where. It later seems to mean breeches or a kind of plant. Neither seems right.)
__________________
"Kitchen duty is awarded only to those of manifest excellence..." - The Master, Dogen
GLC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2012, 02:08 PM   #27
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,893
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
In Danish, the word "kiks" means cracker or biscuit. That seems closer.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2012, 02:11 PM   #28
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
GLC I presume those dishes were meant as entertainment, and not intended to be consumed as food.
__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2012, 02:28 PM   #29
Head Chef
 
GLC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Near Austin, Texas
Posts: 1,216
Considering the sort of crowd that would have been amused by live frog pie, nothing would surprise me.

(Ummmm. Crunchy frog.)
__________________
"Kitchen duty is awarded only to those of manifest excellence..." - The Master, Dogen
GLC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2012, 02:38 PM   #30
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 347
roasting/baking

I would like to address Historic foodie...why I ask this question,simply because of what joy of cooking said. Roasting is a special type of baking,and seem like there was a difference between baking and roasting besides the same heat process. Also, if you read Tattrat answer "but roasting typical means.......,you kinda get from him he has determined what the roasting processes is. And doing research on the web sites,finding a lot of people say roasting (process)and associate it with carmlizeing....crusty skin ,surface.(just like pan roasting and others say no that's not....its pan frying) We learn from each other. Also was not sure how people could say roasting only applied to meats and veg. When you clearly have baked chicken and that is a meat. So that is why I ask.Maybe to some I am over thinking it ,but to me I don't think so. Just trying to learn the cooking terms.
But, anyways Thanks to you all for all the help.
__________________

__________________
mumu is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
baking

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:34 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.