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Old 03-15-2006, 01:30 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironchef
Just taste as you go. Certain ingredients and/or cooking techniques/times may need to be adjusted depending on if you are dividing or multiplying the recipe.
Thank you, IC. Here's a look-see of some good-looking recipes, I'd like to see if I can adapt for a home cook:

http://www.food-management.com/recipes.php
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Old 03-15-2006, 02:27 PM   #12
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I know when commercial manufacturers scale a recipe they use ratios, 2% of this and 5% of that. I have seen this done when we have used wieghts but am not really sure if you are making soup or bread that uses measurements such as Tablespoons.
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Old 03-15-2006, 02:32 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by bknox
I know when commercial manufacturers scale a recipe they use ratios, 2% of this and 5% of that. I have seen this done when we have used wieghts but am not really sure if you are making soup or bread that uses measurements such as Tablespoons.
Thanks bknox. Good to know. My main concern is for main dishes.
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Old 03-15-2006, 02:40 PM   #14
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I am no good at any kind of math, mish. Please excuse me from this discussion. I usually make too much of everything.
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Old 03-15-2006, 04:31 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix
Andy...why is baking different?...
I'm wondering why baking is different too.

If the original recipe gives ingredients by weight and I have a scale so I can also measure by weight, why wouldn't increasing/decreasing the recipe mathematically work - at least for the ingredients part of the recipe?

(I understand that baking times would have to be adjusted for the modified recipe and that would have to be based on experience or trial-and-error - not math!)
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Old 03-15-2006, 04:35 PM   #16
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My thoughts exactly. Although if I am doubling recipes I frequently would just use two or three pans and keep checking them to see if they were done.
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Old 03-15-2006, 04:52 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix
Andy...why is baking different? I have never had an issue with trebling a cookie recipe for example.
Alix:

Scaling up a baking recipe can be problematic for a number of reasons. Recipes using yeast or chemical leaveners are especially difficult. A packet of active dry yeast, for example, can handle up to 6 cups of flour but are oftenused for half that amount.

A smaller increase in baking powder/soda is often called for. If doubling a recipe, you probably would only increase the baking powder/soda by 1.5 times.

Also, you have pan size to consider as well as the cooking times.
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Old 03-15-2006, 05:29 PM   #18
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You have be careful about things like salt. As an example I was tripling a baked corn recipe. This was a recipe I had made many times as a regular recipe. I tripled everything. It was way too salty. I fixed it by making up a single recipe with no salt and no salt added corn. I mixed it with the salty triple batch. The next time I added only 1 1/2 times the salt to make a triple recipe and then tasted before adding any more.
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Old 03-15-2006, 05:39 PM   #19
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Thank you Andy. I guess I am lucky I have never had an issue with any of my doubled or trebled recipes. I will pay attention to things like leavener from now on.
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Old 03-15-2006, 06:06 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
Alix:

Scaling up a baking recipe can be problematic for a number of reasons. Recipes using yeast or chemical leaveners are especially difficult. A packet of active dry yeast, for example, can handle up to 6 cups of flour but are oftenused for half that amount.

A smaller increase in baking powder/soda is often called for. If doubling a recipe, you probably would only increase the baking powder/soda by 1.5 times.

Also, you have pan size to consider as well as the cooking times.
Andy - thanks, that makes sense.

I'm thinking, though, that part of the problem may lie with recipes geared for the home cook (for example, most recipes I see for bread call for waaay to much yeast IMHO).

Re baked goods, what if one started with a recipe for professional cooks that you wanted to scale down? The ones I've seen always have measurements by weight (for example, "Baking and Pastry" by the Culinary Institute of America). Do you think this kind of recipe would scale down more reliably?

I agree baking times would be a challenge - different pan sizes, more/fewer pans in the oven, type of oven - all of this would affect baking time and maybe even initial temp.
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