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Old 01-01-2012, 12:35 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Fabiabi View Post
That's very interesting to hear about pinching salt with your fingers. I like the idea of having ones own individual salt cellar.
I have several salt cellars that were passed down. I like them--they are fun to put on the table. My favorite is a little Norwegian ship. It is pewter, so I am not sure about using it, but it sure is cute.
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Old 01-01-2012, 12:39 PM   #22
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Not the Diamond Crystal Brand, which is what I buy.
Newp.. not that one. I think it mighta been Morton.
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Old 01-01-2012, 01:04 PM   #23
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I have hypothyroidism and am on medicine for it. About two years ago I started to use sea salt because it has natural iodine and other minerals. I don't like the refined table salt that has iodine added It has a metal taste to me. All I know is that since I have been using sea salt, my medicine for my thyroid has been cut in half. And I prefer the taste of it. I keep a salt cellar of course beside the stove for cooking and another salt cellar of the fine for table use. I have noticed the biggest difference in using sea salt in cooking pasta. I add it to the water and when I test it, it has a clean taste and I don't need to add any when I have the finished product at the table. I even use the fine for baking. It really helps chocolate bloom.
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Old 01-01-2012, 01:09 PM   #24
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When I first heard of sea salt and started using it in the early '70s, it was very grey. I had some concern that it was that colour from oil spills. 0_o
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Old 01-01-2012, 01:10 PM   #25
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I have several salt cellars that were passed down. I like them--they are fun to put on the table. My favorite is a little Norwegian ship. It is pewter, so I am not sure about using it, but it sure is cute.
Speaking of salt cellars, I saw these on Amazon...

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...pf_rd_i=507846

Very cool and would look nice on the table for get togethers. I don't have $50 of disposable income at the moment, but might pick them up somewhere down the road.
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Old 01-01-2012, 01:12 PM   #26
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Speaking of salt cellars, I saw these on Amazon...

Amazon.com: Colorful mini ceramic salt cellars, set of 6 assorted colors, French: Kitchen & Dining

Very cool and would look nice on the table for get togethers. I don't have $50 of disposable income at the moment, but might pick them up somewhere down the road.
Oh, they are cute. And, they have the teeny, weenie, little spoons.
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Old 01-01-2012, 01:27 PM   #27
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On the subject of salt, you guys might find this weird, but our college-age daughter only recently learned how to use salt and pepper shakers. Absolutely true. Some of her friends probably think she was raised in a cave, but we've never owned a set of them. Not a one. I have a pepper grinder and wooden salt cellar with spoon that I always put out on the table for people to use (they don't even match).

So it struck me as funny one day when we were at a restaurant and I saw our kid pick up a salt shaker and sort of wave it upside down over her food like a Harry Potter wand. I tried not to laugh, and then showed her how to use it the right way. Sometimes we just take these things for granted I guess.
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Old 01-01-2012, 01:28 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
Not the Diamond Crystal Brand, which is what I buy.
Why do you use that instead of ordinary table salt?

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I've read Kurlansky's book. He discusses in great detail how unrefined sea salt was used throughout history, mostly because people had no other choices. But he also goes on to say that refined salt, when available, was almost universally preferred. I think that still holds true today, for the most part. Unrefined sea salt has become sort of a foodie fad item in recent years, but I don't see it as a replacement for refined salt.
I think most people just reach for the Morton's and never give it another thought.
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Old 01-01-2012, 01:34 PM   #29
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Steve, I can particularly relate to your daughter's dillemna. I put a pepper mill and salt cellars, spoons with kosher large crystal salt when I set the table (I'm using that loosely, my husband actually sets the table). We don't have kids, but some of our newer friends and younger children keep looking around for the salt and pepper shakers!
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Old 01-01-2012, 01:39 PM   #30
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I prefer salt cellars that will absorb any moisture and have an attached cover. Wooden and unglazed white clay ones are the best for this purpose. If the clay ones are glazed, it blocks the absorption of moisture.
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