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Old 09-05-2016, 01:35 PM   #21
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It sounds a lot like that is exactly what has happened over the decades. I found an article that explains about how a larger bird came about. It's an easy read, if you want to find out more: How Did Modern Chickens Get So Damned Big?
That was a very interesting read CG!!!
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Old 09-05-2016, 01:37 PM   #22
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I have never been a fan of chicken white meat. I prefer the thighs and legs. But I often cooked chicken fingers from the breasts for the kids. Looking at the breasts today, I could now feed an orphanage with just a couple of packages of the Dolly Breasts.

CWS has allowed her chickens to be free range come early Spring. They do a great jobs looking for worms and other bugs while turning over the dirt in her garden just before planting. And I am sure it also helps keep down the count of any unwanted nasty critters.

Now I have never heard her mention any of her chickens making it to the dinner table. But I have the feeling that if any do, they certainly are not Dolly Chickens. I would love to have her chime in right about now on just how she raises her chickens to be normal ones. The ones like we all grew up with.
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Old 09-05-2016, 02:48 PM   #23
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The ones like we all grew up with.

That's wishful thinking Addie.

But I'll wish along side of you.

Size vs. Taste?????

Size sells and taste costs extra.

Hmmmm.... What's a businessman to do?

Seems Dolly Breasts are the future until the media tells the sheeple that boneless/skinless chicken breasts are not the end all of "healthy" eating.
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Old 09-05-2016, 03:51 PM   #24
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Adding a salt solution is essentially brining, which people often do at home...
Also, it's illegal to use hormones in chicken in the United States. Putting on the package that it's hormone-free is just marketing...
I understand the brining part, GG. Sometimes it isn't needed (like poaching a chicken to use for a quick soup - I have an Asian soup that does just that) and I would much rather have the option. Plus, I want all meat for my $1.49, not salt water!

And the "no growth hormone" thing? Same as all milk stating "no rBST in our milk, nope, never" even though it is illegal to give that to dairy cows. Marketing.

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That was a very interesting read CG!!!
Thanks, K. Glad you liked it.

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...CWS has allowed her chickens to be free range come early Spring...Now I have never heard her mention any of her chickens making it to the dinner table. But I have the feeling that if any do, they certainly are not Dolly Chickens...
CWS has laying hens, right Addie? I guess you didn't read the article I had linked to. It states "As chicken meat rose in popularity, farmers would raise chickens for two distinct jobs: “layers” were bred to lay as many eggs as possible, while “broilers” were bred for desirable meat traits."

My grandma raised hens. Layers, of course, because that's how they did it back in the 1930s and '40s. Mom could always tell if a chicken was slaughtered young (because of a mishap or she wasn't laying enough) or old. The young were roasted, whereas the senior hens were always soup.
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Old 09-05-2016, 04:10 PM   #25
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Old 09-06-2016, 01:59 AM   #26
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I was reading 'The Egg and I' and in it, Betty MacDonald states that her husband didn't believe in mixing breeding and egg raising, and at that time (around the late 1920s) that was supposed to be a very modern view of chicken ranching. So it seems like that was about the time the separation between raising chickens to get eggs and raising them for meat was probably just getting started.
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Old 09-06-2016, 11:59 PM   #27
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I understand the brining part, GG. Sometimes it isn't needed (like poaching a chicken to use for a quick soup - I have an Asian soup that does just that) and I would much rather have the option. Plus, I want all meat for my $1.49, not salt water!

And the "no growth hormone" thing? Same as all milk stating "no rBST in our milk, nope, never" even though it is illegal to give that to dairy cows. Marketing.


Thanks, K. Glad you liked it.


CWS has laying hens, right Addie? I guess you didn't read the article I had linked to. It states "As chicken meat rose in popularity, farmers would raise chickens for two distinct jobs: “layers” were bred to lay as many eggs as possible, while “broilers” were bred for desirable meat traits."

My grandma raised hens. Layers, of course, because that's how they did it back in the 1930s and '40s. Mom could always tell if a chicken was slaughtered young (because of a mishap or she wasn't laying enough) or old. The young were roasted, whereas the senior hens were always soup.
I did read it CG. I know she raises laying chickens. It is how she obtained her second clutch. They hatched and she was having trouble naming them all. Now they just start every spring scratching up the garden and laying eggs wherever they are wont to. She has to hunt for them for collection. All her chickens are vaccinated as required by Canadian law, but do not receive hormone shots to increase their size.
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Old 09-07-2016, 01:12 AM   #28
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Beef is still allowed to get hormones in the USA but not poultry, my friends the scientist told me why, poultry grow bigger legs and not breast when injected so doesn't give the right effect.

So instead of Dolly Parton, it would be T Rex chicken.
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Old 09-07-2016, 07:04 PM   #29
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I did read it CG. I know she raises laying chickens. It is how she obtained her second clutch. They hatched and she was having trouble naming them all. Now they just start every spring scratching up the garden and laying eggs wherever they are wont to. She has to hunt for them for collection. All her chickens are vaccinated as required by Canadian law, but do not receive hormone shots to increase their size.
And that's related to her not eating them how?
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