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Old 08-13-2014, 10:17 AM   #11
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Oops!, I should have mentioned Haggis shouldn't I? It is a 'given' for us of course along with Stornoway Black pudding. Every Burns night ( January 23rd) we have a Ceilidh here at home and treat our French and british friends alike to this traditional meal. We also manage to imbibe a bit of the water of life as well of course.
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Old 08-13-2014, 10:18 AM   #12
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Ooops - sorry for that then. It must a popular misconception then, since I have never heard it referred to as Bakewell Pudding!

I wouldn't mind having the original recipe. (What I know of this e.g. frangipane etc ranks as one of my fav desserts).
Ok, Creative. I'll look it out later and post it here
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Old 08-13-2014, 10:24 AM   #13
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When we first came to France I was in need of suet to make our 1st Christmas puddings / mincemeat but, alas, no Atora!! I went to the local Abattoir and explained what I needed and duly fetched it a couple of days later. Not using it here for cooking they said I could have it Gratuit et bon noel!! ( Free and happy Christmas you strange deranged foreign woman) I added those last bits. Anyway, I had this whole lump of hard kidney fat so I rendered it down in water in the oven on a very low heat for a long slow time, let it cool overnight, skimmed off the now smooth fat and, yes, MC froze it in manageable sizes. Holding it in a butter paper so as not to add my skin to the product and working quickly I grated what I needed on my trusty cheese grater. Forked in a little flour to stop it reforming into another lump and 'Hey Presto' it worked very well..........................I now send my friends shopping for Atora when they visit the UK. I am not perfect OK?
Whenever I buy a rib roast, I always ask my butcher for a strip of beef suet. He give me a nice long strip from the side of the cow. One side is kind of dirty, so I use my cheese slicer to clean it off. Then wash the strip in cold water. I use it to wrap my rib roast. The melted fat makes for a great Yorkshire Pudding when the roast is done along with keeping the roast moist. No charge either. It would only be sold and go back to the waste meat processing company.
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Old 08-13-2014, 10:26 AM   #14
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Heinz tomato soup, cheese on toast with worcester sauce splashed over it, scones with strawberry jam and clotted cream.( don't ask, just know it is divine, thick, rich cream).............hang on a minute,I'm thinking I'll move back?????
I don't use much tinned soup but I always keep a can of Heinz Cream of Tomato soup in for moments of crisis. There's nothing like a mug of it when you're feeling rattled and stressed - Chicken soup for the gentiles.
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Old 08-13-2014, 10:33 AM   #15
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When we first came to France I was in need of suet to make our 1st Christmas puddings / mincemeat but, alas, no Atora!! I went to the local Abattoir and explained what I needed and duly fetched it a couple of days later. Not using it here for cooking they said I could have it Gratuit et bon noel!! ( Free and happy christmas you strange deranged foreign woman) I added those last bits. Anyway, I had this whole lump of hard kidney fat so I rendered it down in water in the oven on a very low heat for a long slow time, let it cool overnight, skimmed off the now smooth fat and, yes, MC froze it in manageable sizes. Holding it in a butter paper so as not to add my skin to the product and working quickly I grated what I needed on my trusty cheese grater. Forked in a little flour to stop it reforming into another lump and 'Hey Presto' it worked very well..........................I now send my friends shopping for Atora when they visit the UK. I am not perfect OK?
Why go to all the bother if you have access to Tescos
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Old 08-13-2014, 12:14 PM   #16
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Here are some comfort foods that we relished in our circle trip through England back in 1997: We stayed almost exclusively at B & B's and the English breakfasts were beyond compare. Broiled tomatoes, lime marmalade, thick cut bacon, and I loved the potent English breakfast tea.

Some my favorites:

Bangers and mash - We tried this at Stratford-Upon-Avon. Heavenly!

Bubble and squeak - A great breakfast treat made with leftover potatoes, cabbage, pork/bacon, and any other left-over veggies. Fried up fairly flat in a pan with the texture of compacted hash browns.

Colcannon - A simple but delicious Irish dish made with potatoes, (what else?) cabbage, onions, and lots of butter. The Brits, Scots, and Irish know what to do with these simple ingredients.

Traditional fish and chips made with cod and thick-cut potatoes and lots of malt vinegar.

Creamed English peas and potatoes.

English Trifle - One of the world's truly greatest desserts!

English candy - Can I get an 'amen' on some of the popular candies that can be found at any of the rest stops on the motor-ways?

Finally, anyone who says England doesn't have a fine cuisine needs to get his/her head examined. English food hit my sweet spot about as perfectly as anything I have ever eaten anywhere.
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Old 08-13-2014, 12:30 PM   #17
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Will somebody please tell me how to make that Scotch Egg like in the picture? The only ones I've seen are with a hard boiled egg in the middle. The one in the picture has me drooling with that luscious runny yolk.

Speaking of the Lake District, it's one of the most beautiful places in the world and I'll remember it always. We stayed in a lovely little cottage there and visited Beatrix Potter's house, something I had dreamed of since childhood. I highly recommend renting the movie "Miss Potter" ...
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Old 08-13-2014, 01:10 PM   #18
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Bangers and mash - We tried this at Stratford-Upon-Avon. Heavenly!
I have always found proper English bangers too fluffy in texture. If using real sausage instead it is a great (and simple) dish.
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Traditional fish and chips made with cod and thick-cut potatoes and lots of malt vinegar.
Cod. Some places has tried to get too fancy with it. And serve it in newsprint.

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Originally Posted by chiklitmanfan View Post
English candy - Can I get an 'amen' on some of the popular candies that can be found at any of the rest stops on the motor-ways?
I used to be sure to get a bag of wine gums for the flight home. I have never seen them here and they seem to taste best at flight level 350.

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Finally, anyone who says England doesn't have a fine cuisine needs to get his/her head examined. English food hit my sweet spot about as perfectly as anything I have ever eaten anywhere.
I particularly loved the Sunday roasts in the country. Big hunk of roasted meet and some root vegetables served with peas.

I do miss making trips to Jolly Ol'.
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Old 08-13-2014, 01:23 PM   #19
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I've travelled to the UK many times on business over the years and really developed a fondness for the foods. I would consider many of the items on the list above to be "pub grub" and I've tried most them at one time or another.

Cornish Pasties and the many tasty variants are probably my favorite. Several years ago I spent an entire summer working in the little village of Evesham (in Worcestershire) and the one thing I looked forward to every day was knocking off for lunch and walking across the street to the pasty shop. I would gather up my treat and head over to the park to enjoy it while sitting on a bench overlooking the ruins of an old abbey. Sometimes I would sit by the river and watch the swans. Good times.

One other thing that always struck me as "comfort food" in the UK was curry. I spent many a night at some backwater little curry house, where the food was usually divine.
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Old 08-13-2014, 01:24 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiklitmanfan View Post
Here are some comfort foods that we relished in our circle trip through England back in 1997: We stayed almost exclusively at B & B's and the English breakfasts were beyond compare. Broiled tomatoes, lime marmalade, thick cut bacon, and I loved the potent English breakfast tea.

Some my favorites:

Bangers and mash - We tried this at Stratford-Upon-Avon. Heavenly!

Bubble and squeak - A great breakfast treat made with leftover potatoes, cabbage, pork/bacon, and any other left-over veggies. Fried up fairly flat in a pan with the texture of compacted hash browns.

Colcannon - A simple but delicious Irish dish made with potatoes, (what else?) cabbage, onions, and lots of butter. The Brits, Scots, and Irish know what to do with these simple ingredients.

Traditional fish and chips made with cod and thick-cut potatoes and lots of malt vinegar.

Creamed English peas and potatoes.

English Trifle - One of the world's truly greatest desserts!

English candy - Can I get an 'amen' on some of the popular candies that can be found at any of the rest stops on the motor-ways?

Finally, anyone who says England doesn't have a fine cuisine needs to get his/her head examined. English food hit my sweet spot about as perfectly as anything I have ever eaten anywhere.
Yes! Bubble and squeak! And how did they miss out English Trifle?
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