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Old 08-14-2014, 03:55 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
Will somebody please tell me how to make that Scotch Egg like in the picture? The only ones I've seen are with a hard boiled egg in the middle. The one in the picture has me drooling with that luscious runny yolk.

Speaking of the Lake District, it's one of the most beautiful places in the world and I'll remember it always. We stayed in a lovely little cottage there and visited Beatrix Potter's house, something I had dreamed of since childhood. I highly recommend renting the movie "Miss Potter" ...

Too fussy for me!

How to Cook Like Heston - Articles - Scotch Eggs Recipe - Channel 4
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Old 08-14-2014, 05:04 AM   #22
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Aunt Bea - at a guess, I would say it just entailed soft boiling rather than hard boiling the egg....but maybe for a minute or so under the usual timing (to allow further cooking once deep fried).
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Old 08-14-2014, 12:18 PM   #23
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Thanks for that AB. Sheesh, the thought of try to shell a soft boiled egg boggles the mind. On his video even he screwed up the first one. The concept is so cool though, kinda like a Baked Alaska, only harder.
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Old 08-14-2014, 02:51 PM   #24
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Here are some comfort foods that we relished in our circle trip through England back in 1997: We stayed almost exclusively at B & B's and the English breakfasts were beyond compare. Broiled tomatoes, lime marmalade, thick cut bacon, and I loved the potent English breakfast tea.

Some my favorites:

Bangers and mash - We tried this at Stratford-Upon-Avon. Heavenly!

Bubble and squeak - A great breakfast treat made with leftover potatoes, cabbage, pork/bacon, and any other left-over veggies. Fried up fairly flat in a pan with the texture of compacted hash browns.

Colcannon - A simple but delicious Irish dish made with potatoes, (what else?) cabbage, onions, and lots of butter. The Brits, Scots, and Irish know what to do with these simple ingredients.

Traditional fish and chips made with cod and thick-cut potatoes and lots of malt vinegar.

Creamed English peas and potatoes.

English Trifle - One of the world's truly greatest desserts!

English candy - Can I get an 'amen' on some of the popular candies that can be found at any of the rest stops on the motor-ways?

Finally, anyone who says England doesn't have a fine cuisine needs to get his/her head examined. English food hit my sweet spot about as perfectly as anything I have ever eaten anywhere.
Thank you.

I think our reputation for poor food came from the very stringent WWII rationing which continued for nearly 10 years on some foodstuffs. The last thing to come "off the ration" was chocolate in 1954. Oddly enough, the population was said to have been healthier then than at any time since rationing ended!
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Old 08-14-2014, 02:55 PM   #25
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Thank you.

I think our reputation for poor food came from the very stringent WWII rationing which continued for nearly 10 years on some foodstuffs. The last thing to come "off the ration" was chocolate in 1954. Oddly enough, the population was said to have been healthier then than at any time since rationing ended!
In my case, it came from personal experience during a trip there in 1981.
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Old 08-14-2014, 05:00 PM   #26
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Hubby #1 and I had an agreement. Whichever one was in the kitchen, the other one kept their mouth shut and ate was put on the table. As a young bride and only knowing the dishes my mother taught me, he would go into the kitchen to cook some of the foods of his homeland. I would sit there and watch. Occasionally I would ask a question and he would explain. Then I would try to get up the courage to make one of the dishes. Bubble and Squeek was my only great success. But I did learn a lot from him. Being married to a professional chef had it challenges in the kitchen.
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Old 08-15-2014, 03:33 AM   #27
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creative you don't have to be British to enjoy many of those foods. We're lucky enough to have an Irish pub about 15 miles from us that serves many of those foods in a most tasty manner. In fact, I enjoy many of the variations of mash (Colcannon, Boxty) with bangers. Just wish I knew where to source bangers to cook at home. This pub also has Scotch eggs. One of these days I want to make them at home.

MC my Mom used to make kidney stew several times a winter when I was a kid. Loved it! Then I found out what exactly a kidney was. Urp. Just the idea of organ meat... Not to single out British fare, I had the same reaction when I found out that my much loved Polish soup czarnina was not, as my dear Great Aunt would tell me, made from solid chocolates but was instead duck's blood soup. Nanna NEVER got another Hershey bar from my stash again.

Bubble and Squeak has graced out plates here at home. We ran across it on our first visit to Williamsburg VA and bought the cookbook from there so I could duplicate many of the foods. That book has served me well for over 35 years.
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Old 08-15-2014, 04:27 AM   #28
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creative you don't have to be British to enjoy many of those foods. We're lucky enough to have an Irish pub about 15 miles from us that serves many of those foods in a most tasty manner. In fact, I enjoy many of the variations of mash (Colcannon, Boxty) with bangers. Just wish I knew where to source bangers to cook at home. This pub also has Scotch eggs. One of these days I want to make them at home.
Indeed! Nowhere did I imply you had to be British to enjoy these foods...that would be ridiculous. If you go to my OP you will see the reason I started this thread.

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Old 08-15-2014, 05:21 AM   #29
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No. But he took my youngest daughter when she was in the fifth grade. I would sell the blood of my firstborn to see the country side and villages of the UK.
If you ever win the lottery you're welcome to come and stay with me and let me show you round the country.
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Old 08-15-2014, 06:24 AM   #30
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creative you don't have to be British to enjoy many of those foods. We're lucky enough to have an Irish pub about 15 miles from us that serves many of those foods in a most tasty manner. In fact, I enjoy many of the variations of mash (Colcannon, Boxty) with bangers. Just wish I knew where to source bangers to cook at home. This pub also has Scotch eggs. One of these days I want to make them at home.

MC my Mom used to make kidney stew several times a winter when I was a kid. Loved it! Then I found out what exactly a kidney was. Urp. Just the idea of organ meat... Not to single out British fare, I had the same reaction when I found out that my much loved Polish soup czarnina was not, as my dear Great Aunt would tell me, made from solid chocolates but was instead duck's blood soup. Nanna NEVER got another Hershey bar from my stash again.

Bubble and Squeak has graced out plates here at home. We ran across it on our first visit to Williamsburg VA and bought the cookbook from there so I could duplicate many of the foods. That book has served me well for over 35 years.
CG here is a recipe for bangers and a mail order source that says it is also available at COSTCO of all places, not sure about that one.

I think you could use crushed saltine crackers in place of rusks and focus more on the combination of spices. I'm going to cut this recipe down and try it with a pound of plain ground pork from the local butcher shop.

Homemade British Bangers and the Search for Rusk | The Paupered Chef

RJ Balson and Son -- Buy Quality British Bangers & Bacon from RJ Balson & Son, England's Oldest Family Butchers
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