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Old 08-15-2014, 06:47 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by creative View Post
Ooops - sorry for that then. It must a popular misconception then, since I have never heard it referred to as Bakewell Pudding!

I wouldn't mind having the original recipe. (What I know of this e.g. frangipane etc ranks as one of my fav desserts).
Here's the recipe.

(I buy the pastry - life's to short to make puff pastry and the "famous" chefs use bought pastry too. I use the Jusroll? butter puff pastry)

Bakewell Pudding

Ingredients
Puff pastry to line a quiche tin (more traditionally and "Bakewell- style" an oval-ish oblong enamel dish)

Raspberry jam. (I use home made if I've got it or "Bonne Maman" but I expect most Bakewellians use bog standard supermarket's jam )

4 ounces butter
6 ounces caster sugar
4 egg yolks and 1 whole egg beaten together (I use large ones)
2 ounces ground almonds

Method
Cream the butter and sugar until pale and fluffy. Beat in the eggs a little at a time. Stir in the almonds (and extract if using - see below). The mix will be quite runny

Line the tin with the pastry and prod the base with a fork to stop it rising through the filling.

Spread the base of the pastry with the jam and pour the filling on top.

Bake in pre-heated oven to gas mark 5 (180deg C) for 30-35 minutes until golden. (Adjust the temp and timing if yours is a fan oven). The filling should still be wobbley and not too dark.

Allow to cool and eat at room temperature (best) or warm (but not too hot.) Some people serve it with cream or custard but I find these a bit too much with the rich filling.

(If you feel you need a touch more almond flavour next time use a drop of almond extract (NOT artificial essence) but the almond flavour should be there but shouldn't be too dominant. Also you can adjust the amount of ground almonds if the mixture is too runny
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Old 08-15-2014, 07:23 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
Here's the recipe.

(I buy the pastry - life's to short to make puff pastry and the "famous" chefs use bought pastry too. I use the Jusroll? butter puff pastry)

Bakewell Pudding

Ingredients
Puff pastry to line a quiche tin (more traditionally and "Bakewell- style" an oval-ish oblong enamel dish)

Raspberry jam. (I use home made if I've got it or "Bonne Maman" but I expect most Bakewellians use bog standard supermarket's jam )

4 ounces butter
6 ounces caster sugar
4 egg yolks and 1 whole egg beaten together (I use large ones)
2 ounces ground almonds

Method
Cream the butter and sugar until pale and fluffy. Beat in the eggs a little at a time. Stir in the almonds (and extract if using - see below). The mix will be quite runny

Line the tin with the pastry and prod the base with a fork to stop it rising through the filling.

Spread the base of the pastry with the jam and pour the filling on top.

Bake in pre-heated oven to gas mark 5 (180deg C) for 30-35 minutes until golden. (Adjust the temp and timing if yours is a fan oven). The filling should still be wobbley and not too dark.

Allow to cool and eat at room temperature (best) or warm (but not too hot.) Some people serve it with cream or custard but I find these a bit too much with the rich filling.

(If you feel you need a touch more almond flavour next time use a drop of almond extract (NOT artificial essence) but the almond flavour should be there but shouldn't be too dominant. Also you can adjust the amount of ground almonds if the mixture is too runny
IMO the Bakewell puddings at Bloomers bakery are far superior to those at the ones at the "Original Bakewell Pudding Shop" (and actually more original).
Bloomers of Bakewell - The Original Bakewell Pudding

Bakewell is a great day out. Monday is market day so parking can be horrendous. Nice stroll by the river, lots of little shops, Not in a position to recommend a pub for lunch as I haven't been in one lately and things change so quickly in the pub trade. Close to Chatsworth House (supposed to be the house Jane Austen based Pemberley on in "Pride and Prejudice".) and Haddon Hall (both open to the public). The farm shop at Chatsworth is very good. There is a shopping outlet place a Rowsley (on the road to Matlock). Perhaps you'll need a weekend to fit all that in!



Bakewell is a great day out. Monday is market day so parking can be horrendous. Nice stroll by the river, lots of little shops, I'm not in a position to recommend a pub for lunch as I haven't been in one lately and things change so quickly in the pub trade. Close to Chatsworth House (supposed to be the house Jane Austen based Pemberley on in "Pride and Prejudice".) and Haddon Hall (both open to the public). he farm shop at Chatsworth is very good. There is a shopping outlet place a Rowsley (on the road to Matlock). Perhaps you'll need a weekend to fit all that in!
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Old 08-15-2014, 07:29 AM   #33
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Thanks Mad Cow. I like that it has flaky pastry base and lots of egg yolks. I don't have a very sweet tooth so I would bring the sugar down to the same quantity as the butter (I often use honey since I dislike white sugar). Yes I know about the difference between essence and extract. I used to get it from health shops but I see now that supermarkets are wise to the difference and stock them now too.

I see you have given a link...what is that served with the pudding? Custard?
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Old 08-15-2014, 08:08 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by FrankZ View Post
I have always found proper English bangers too fluffy in texture. If using real sausage instead it is a great (and simple) dish.


Cod. Some places has tried to get too fancy with it. And serve it in newsprint.



I used to be sure to get a bag of wine gums for the flight home. I have never seen them here and they seem to taste best at flight level 350.



I particularly loved the Sunday roasts in the country. Big hunk of roasted meet and some root vegetables served with peas.

I do miss making trips to Jolly Ol'.
Sadly, there are bangers and PROPER bangers. At the cheapest end of the market they have a minimum of 65% meat, some or all of which can be "recovered" meat (don't ask!) and a lot of rusk as filler and basic seasoning. Pasty, cheap and yuck!

A good British sausage will have 80-85% or more good meat such as pork shoulder and seasonings which might include herbs and spices. There is still some rusk to help hold the sausage together. The meat is often ground quite coarsely and in speciality sausages may include venison or wild boar or even lamb and mint. Yum. Obviously they are at the dearer end of the market. Around the area I live in there is also "tomato" sausage. This is made with beef, pork and tomato - more of a curiosity in my mind but lots of people like them.

Incidentally, the name "banger" originated in WWI when meat was scarce and a lot of water was added to the mix and when they were frying they burst with a loud bang! I didn't know that until a couple of months ago. Never too old to learn something new.

This is all making me crave sausages for lunch. I like my bangers and mash with onion gravy.

Glad you enjoyed British food. Lots of visitors from abroad are surprised at how good it is when done well. I met an American lady in Petra (name dropping here) who said she'd enjoyed England but thought the food was dreadful. "Oh dear. Where did you eat?" said I. "Oh, we'd heard the food was bad so we ate in McDonalds and KFC". I was sorely tempted to say "Serves you right"! ( McD & KFC are truly dreadful over here.)
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Old 08-15-2014, 08:22 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
Will somebody please tell me how to make that Scotch Egg like in the picture? The only ones I've seen are with a hard boiled egg in the middle. The one in the picture has me drooling with that luscious runny yolk.
I couldn't spot them in the clip you attached. I'd only ever come across scotch eggs made with hard boiled eggs until I saw Heston Blumenthal trying to make them with soft yolks on television a while back. They are basically picnic food and popular for shooting parties in the Downton era - you wouldn't want egg yolk running down your tweed shooting jacket and plus fours.

They originated in India apparently, although they are considered quintessentially British. You can but some cheap and nasty ones over here but the best are made with really good sausage meat
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Old 08-15-2014, 08:24 AM   #36
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Originally Posted by creative View Post
Thanks Mad Cow. I like that it has flaky pastry base and lots of egg yolks. I don't have a very sweet tooth so I would bring the sugar down to the same quantity as the butter (I often use honey since I dislike white sugar). Yes I know about the difference between essence and extract. I used to get it from health shops but I see now that supermarkets are wise to the difference and stock them now too.

I see you have given a link...what is that served with the pudding? Custard
?
Either custard or cream. A matter of choice I think.
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Old 08-15-2014, 09:42 AM   #37
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Lorraine Pascal does a baked scotch egg recipe ( google her )which is pretty good if you don't, 1. have a deep fat frier like me or 2. prefer this 'healthier option
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Old 08-17-2014, 06:27 PM   #38
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So many of these comfort favourites remind me of school! I'm from Kent and almost everyone's hands-down favourite school dessert was an incredibly sweet and rare treat called Gypsy Tart. Maybe others also remember it..... For a long time, the recipe was something of a mystery and almost no one apart from school dinner ladies seemed to know how to make it. Now, of course, there are versions of the recipe online, including one by Nigella Lawson, from which I have just learned that gypsy tart apparently originated on Kent's Isle of Sheppey.

Last time I went home, I discovered a tiny bakery in Dymchurch, which sold a gypsy tart that actually tasted just like the original, authentic school-dinner version. Fatal for the figure but totally delicious! If you're ever in Dymchurch, I would recommend it. You'll have to go there early, though, because in my experience, by lunch-time they will have sold out!
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Old 08-17-2014, 06:46 PM   #39
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Originally Posted by Mrs JJJ View Post
So many of these comfort favourites remind me of school! I'm from Kent and almost everyone's hands-down favourite school dessert was an incredibly sweet and rare treat called Gypsy Tart. Maybe others also remember it..... For a long time, the recipe was something of a mystery and almost no one apart from school dinner ladies seemed to know how to make it. Now, of course, there are versions of the recipe online, including one by Nigella Lawson, from which I have just learned that gypsy tart apparently originated on Kent's Isle of Sheppey.

Last time I went home, I discovered a tiny bakery in Dymchurch, which sold a gypsy tart that actually tasted just like the original, authentic school-dinner version. Fatal for the figure but totally delicious! If you're ever in Dymchurch, I would recommend it. You'll have to go there early, though, because in my experience, by lunch-time they will have sold out!
Thanks, this sounds like a quick easy recipe from pantry staples.

I think I would need a dollop of whipped cream on mine!
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Old 08-18-2014, 10:47 AM   #40
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I don't use much tinned soup but I always keep a can of Heinz Cream of Tomato soup in for moments of crisis. There's nothing like a mug of it when you're feeling rattled and stressed - Chicken soup for the gentiles.
You should really have a grilled cheese sandwich with that mug of tomato soup. In my part of the world, it is almost sinful to just have one and not the other.
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