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Old 08-13-2014, 05:18 AM   #1
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Lightbulb Some Classic Comfort Foods Of UK

I just read an interesting thread on comfort foods of US. Whilst we are a smaller country (and in no way is this an attempt to compete), since this seems to be a US based cookery forum I thought you might like to see our list.

In my view it misses out a few, e.g. Steak & Kidney Pie, Lancashire Hotpot and Bakewell tart amongst others.

British comfort food to make your mouth water - Telegraph

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Old 08-13-2014, 07:24 AM   #2
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There is a Pub in Vermont run by two men and their wives who are from Scotland. Poo took me there and the menu is rather small, but that didn't matter because right at the top in big letters was "Bangers and Mashed Potatoes." I just had to order them. They were so good.

You feel like you really in the UK when you walk through the door. I could only wish my first husband was alive. He would have felt right at home.
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Old 08-13-2014, 08:04 AM   #3
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Heinz tomato soup, cheese on toast with worcester sauce splashed over it, scones with strawberry jam and clotted cream.( don't ask, just know it is divine, thick, rich cream).............hang on a minute,I'm thinking I'll move back?????
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Old 08-13-2014, 08:20 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by creative View Post
I just read an interesting thread on comfort foods of US. Whilst we are a smaller country (and in no way is this an attempt to compete), since this seems to be a US based cookery forum I thought you might like to see our list.

In my view it misses out a few, e.g. Steak & Kidney Pie, Lancashire Hotpot and Bakewell tart amongst others.

British comfort food to make your mouth water - Telegraph
Creative, as a one-time resident of Bakewell in Derbyshire, I have to take you up on Bakewell tart. In the town it's called Bakewell PUDDING and woe be-tide you if you call it a tart. It shows you up as an in-comer

I have the original recipe if you'd like it. The cook in the boarding school I taught in was the umpteenth great neice cook at the Rutland Hotel who first made it by accident when the landlady of the hotel garbled the instructions for a different sort of tart.

There's a rather nasty version made by the mammoth commercial bakeries which they call Bakewell tart which has flour and nasty artificial almond flavouring in it but it doesn't hold a candle to the real McCoy.
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Old 08-13-2014, 09:10 AM   #5
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Steak & Kidney Pudding

(or Kate and Sidney, as my old Dad used to call it.)

BBC - Food - Recipes : Steak and kidney pudding
(If you don't like kidney you can substitute mushrooms)

Good "rib sticking", winter warming food. We can buy Atora shredded suet in packets in the supermarket but a good butcher should be able to provide some. Suet is the hard white fat on the kidneys and loins of cattle or sheep. Beef suet is best. If you are regular/good customer the butcher may be inclined to process it for you (ie remove the membrane and shred the fat) if given enough notice. I have heard that people substitute or other hard fats for the suet but I think you have to freeze it before grating it up and start cooking before the fat melts. Don't quote me on this as I've never used anything but suet.
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Old 08-13-2014, 09:20 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
There is a Pub in Vermont run by two men and their wives who are from Scotland. Poo took me there and the menu is rather small, but that didn't matter because right at the top in big letters was "Bangers and Mashed Potatoes." I just had to order them. They were so good.

You feel like you really in the UK when you walk through the door. I could only wish my first husband was alive. He would have felt right at home.
Did you ever visit over here when you were married to No1, Addie? IIRC you once said he came from the Lake District. It's beautiful country (if it stops raining) for walking, climbing, afternoon tea, or just sitting watching the boats on Lake Windermere or the sheep on the hillsides. Very relaxing. And Carnforth Station buffet was used as a location set for the 1945 film "Brief Encounter" (a big time weepie). It's been restored by it's current owners who run it as a cafe/restaurant. Trains still run through the station but they are no longer drawn by steam locomotives.
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Old 08-13-2014, 09:57 AM   #7
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More British comfort food

1. Cornish or Devon cream tea = scone, jam and clotted cream + pot of tea. The difference between the Devon and the Cornwall versions is that in the Devon version the cream goes on the scone and then the jam and in the Cornish version the jam goes on the scone first and then the cream. I fail to see why it matters but but get it wrong down there in the south west of England and you're likely to get lynched!

2. Haggis (Scotland) = if you don't already know what goes into this and you are given to squeamishness, I suggest you don't ask. Just eat and enjoy with "neeps" (Swede or rutabaga) and a tot of "the water of life" (Scotch whisky to you and me)

3. Derbyshire/Staffordshire oatcakes = a sort of oatmeal pancake, Fry it in the bacon fat and serve with bacon and eggs or wrap round fingers of cheese and heat in the oven or toast and eat with butter and jam. (There's another sort of oatcake in Scotland which is crisp, like a cracker and is served with the cheese board - don't try frying that one!) Recipe for Derbyshire or Staffordshire oatcakes (I can't tell the difference) follows:-

Staffordshire Oatcakes Recipe - staffordshire.co.uk (If you use the instant yeast you just chuck it in with the other dry ingredients.)
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Old 08-13-2014, 09:59 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
Creative, as a one-time resident of Bakewell in Derbyshire, I have to take you up on Bakewell tart. In the town it's called Bakewell PUDDING and woe be-tide you if you call it a tart. It shows you up as an in-comer

I have the original recipe if you'd like it. The cook in the boarding school I taught in was the umpteenth great neice cook at the Rutland Hotel who first made it by accident when the landlady of the hotel garbled the instructions for a different sort of tart.

There's a rather nasty version made by the mammoth commercial bakeries which they call Bakewell tart which has flour and nasty artificial almond flavouring in it but it doesn't hold a candle to the real McCoy.
Ooops - sorry for that then. It must a popular misconception then, since I have never heard it referred to as Bakewell Pudding!

I wouldn't mind having the original recipe. (What I know of this e.g. frangipane etc ranks as one of my fav desserts).
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Old 08-13-2014, 10:09 AM   #9
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When we first came to France I was in need of suet to make our 1st Christmas puddings / mincemeat but, alas, no Atora!! I went to the local Abattoir and explained what I needed and duly fetched it a couple of days later. Not using it here for cooking they said I could have it Gratuit et bon noel!! ( Free and happy christmas you strange deranged foreign woman) I added those last bits. Anyway, I had this whole lump of hard kidney fat so I rendered it down in water in the oven on a very low heat for a long slow time, let it cool overnight, skimmed off the now smooth fat and, yes, MC froze it in manageable sizes. Holding it in a butter paper so as not to add my skin to the product and working quickly I grated what I needed on my trusty cheese grater. Forked in a little flour to stop it reforming into another lump and 'Hey Presto' it worked very well..........................I now send my friends shopping for Atora when they visit the UK. I am not perfect OK?
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Old 08-13-2014, 10:16 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
Did you ever visit over here when you were married to No1, Addie? IIRC you once said he came from the Lake District. It's beautiful country (if it stops raining) for walking, climbing, afternoon tea, or just sitting watching the boats on Lake Windermere or the sheep on the hillsides. Very relaxing. And Carnforth Station buffet was used as a location set for the 1945 film "Brief Encounter" (a big time weepie). It's been restored by it's current owners who run it as a cafe/restaurant. Trains still run through the station but they are no longer drawn by steam locomotives.
No. But he took my youngest daughter when she was in the fifth grade. I would sell the blood of my firstborn to see the country side and villages of the UK.
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