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Old 08-04-2009, 04:46 PM   #11
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sounds like the oil is too hot. I usually season the chicken before the flour.
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Old 08-04-2009, 04:53 PM   #12
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sounds like the oil is too hot. I usually season the chicken before the flour.
That sounds like a good idea, so the flour protects the seasoning.

Do you double dredge? Once in the season then egg then flour?
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Old 08-04-2009, 04:58 PM   #13
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Not usually. If I'm using buttermilk, I season the buttermilk, then just coat with flour and fry.
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Old 08-04-2009, 05:13 PM   #14
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You can soak it in Buttermilk to tenderize it, but then dry it off with a towel, lightly dust it with flour, dredge it in an egg wash, roll it in your final crust, whatever that happens to be (corn flakes, panko bread crumbs, just plain flour, etc.) and then fry, 5 minutes per side, in a preheated cast iron skillet or Dutch oven, uncovered but with a splatter screen, with 3/4-1 inch of crisco over medium high heat - or fry it in a deep fryer at 350 degrees for about 8 minutes (following the directions of your fryer for chicken). This method has never produced undercooked chicken and only given me a golden brown crust. Good luck!!
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Old 08-04-2009, 05:25 PM   #15
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Southern fried chicken is covered when cooking. Thighs take the longest. Get a meat thermometer and test done at 160.
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Old 08-04-2009, 05:33 PM   #16
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Covering it makes it soggy. Rely upon heat of the grease and the pan, not the heat of the air around it to cook the meat.
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Old 08-04-2009, 05:34 PM   #17
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Also, ( I didn't see this mentioned) make sure the oil has reached temperature before putting the chicken in.
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Old 08-05-2009, 05:11 PM   #18
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Covering it makes it soggy. Rely upon heat of the grease and the pan, not the heat of the air around it to cook the meat.
Mmmm. Explain the crunch coming from the thigh I bit in to Sunday at lunch. Tender, juicy, and crispy.
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Old 08-05-2009, 07:15 PM   #19
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All I know is:
1.) frying chicken releases water in the form of steam.
2.) steam trapped by lid equals soggy crust - in my experience.
3.) I don't mess with success and you should do what works for you.

The really important part is to get the chicken cooked all of the way through, and when possible, to share your southern fried chicken with family or friends in companionship.
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Old 08-05-2009, 07:45 PM   #20
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KFC chicken was/is cooked in a pressure cooker to get it tender and crispy. i have heard this on several shows. just adding info.

my mom did hers in a dutch oven by sound, when the spitting eased up she would turn off the oil and put some water in the lid for the pot then clap the lid on the pot (this raised the temp and made the oil boil and gave the chicken a bit of steam and also the extra heat crisped up the coating). when the sizzling eased up in about a minute she turned the fire up full and removed the lid. she cooked just till there was no more spattering sounds. it was always tender, juicy and crisp.
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