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Old 09-14-2009, 11:16 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by msmofet View Post
cottage cheese?
Oh yeh! It makes it all gooey as the cheese curds melt and makes it taste like lasagna. Of course you can use cheese to flavor pasta sauce. Think grated Parmisano Regiano, or a good Asiago, or even think of the flavor a great aged cheddar can give to a good tomato sauce. Cheese is not only a textural thing, but adds great flavor and can be thought of as a flavoring agent, just like herbs, spices, and aromatics.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 09-14-2009, 11:25 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North View Post
Oh yeh! It makes it all gooey as the cheese curds melt and makes it taste like lasagna. Of course you can use cheese to flavor pasta sauce. Think grated Parmisano Regiano, or a good Asiago, or even think of the flavor a great aged cheddar can give to a good tomato sauce. Cheese is not only a textural thing, but adds great flavor and can be thought of as a flavoring agent, just like herbs, spices, and aromatics.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
yikes!! none of my italians auties would ever put cottage cheese in the gravy!
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Old 09-15-2009, 12:54 AM   #13
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yikes!! none of my italians auties would ever put cottage cheese in the gravy!
I'm not Italian. But I am a very creative mutt. And you know the advantage of being a mutt? It gives you many more options than being a purebred. I can draw from a world full of ideas to create my own fusion spins on great food. For instance, I bet none of your Italian Aunties would have combined Cudaghi Sausage and ground beef, along with oregano, basil, egg, milk, salt, pepper, and just a touch of breadcrumbs to make the amazing meatballs that I make. And I can say their amazing because that's how others have described them to me. And if you think that that's an odd combination, how about meatballs made from ground chicken, chopped celery and onion, garlic, and chinese 5-spice, over lo-mein noodles with a pineapple sweet and sour sauce.

Yup, I enjoy being a mutt.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 09-15-2009, 01:02 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North View Post
I'm not Italian. But I am a very creative mutt. And you know the advantage of being a mutt? It gives you many more options than being a purebred. I can draw from a world full of ideas to create my own fusion spins on great food. For instance, I bet none of your Italian Aunties would have combined Cudaghi Sausage and ground beef, along with oregano, basil, egg, milk, salt, pepper, and just a touch of breadcrumbs to make the amazing meatballs that I make. And I can say their amazing because that's how others have described them to me. And if you think that that's an odd combination, how about meatballs made from ground chicken, chopped celery and onion, garlic, and chinese 5-spice, over lo-mein noodles with a pineapple sweet and sour sauce.

Yup, I enjoy being a mutt.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
they all sound interesting and different for sure.
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Old 09-15-2009, 05:20 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by mexican mama View Post
this is what i usually put in mine:

2 tablespoons vegetable oil * 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
* 1/2 teaspoon garlic salt
* 1 (8 ounce) can tomato sauce
* 1 tablespoon chili powder
* 1 1/2 cups water

Mexican Spaghetti???
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Old 09-15-2009, 05:25 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North View Post
Your question is a bit too vague, as there are too many sauce variations to choose from. There are the meat sauces known as Bolognese, there are ragus, Alfredo, oil and herb dressings, cream sauces, veloute's, brown butter sauces, etc.

If you are looking for something resembling Prego, or Ragu brand pasta sauce, start with tomato sauce and tomato paste. The herbs and spices can then include any or all of the following;
Oregano
Sweet Basil
Rosemary
Thyme
Marjoram
Fennel
Black Pepper (optional)
Cayenne Pepper (optional)
Salt
Garlic
Onion
a little bit of sugar or brown sugar (optional)
Sage (optional)

The primary flavors that most American Spagheti Sauces contain are Oregano, Basil, Rosemary, Thyme, Garlic, and Onion. after that, you can add everything from cottage cheese, to nutmeg, depending on the flavor profil you are trying to get. I recomend starting with the 5 flavors first mentioned in this paragraph. expand from there. And remember the two cardinal rules of sauces:

1. add a little herb or spice at a time, let cook for 15 mintues or so, then taste. Correct from there. You can always add more, but once it's in the sauce, you can't remove it. Do not overpower with too much herbs or spices.

2. Patience is required. Cook over low heat to avoid scorching the natural sugars in the sauce, and to allow the flavors time to permeate the sauce.

The herbs and spices I provided are my choices for the style of tomato sauce I prefer. I also use chunky tomato sauce with lots of veggie chunks comprized of green and sweet peppers, onions, and musghrooms. I love big chunks of ground beef in my sauce as well. You might like yours different. I can't tell you how to make the best sauce. Only you can create your favorit, based on what you like.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North

Sage and nugmeg??????
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Old 09-15-2009, 07:32 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by msmofet View Post
they all sound interesting and different for sure.
MsMofet, the use of cottage cheese is a poor man's substitute for ricotta, which is the cheese of choice used in making lasagna. While cottage cheese has a similar appearance to ricotta, any similarity ends there. The flavor of ricotta is superior in every way, as you already know!

And I believe you are right when it comes to not finding it in any normal Italian Spaghetti recipe. Just for curiosity, I consulted with a life-long friend, M. Cappitelli, a Chicago-Italian cook and she had never heard of such a thing, but she had seen it as an ingredient in spaghetti pesto sauce, and in baked spaghetti - strictly American inventions.
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Old 09-15-2009, 09:07 AM   #18
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remember, spaghetti is the name of the pasta, not the sauce.
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Old 09-15-2009, 09:11 AM   #19
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The basic ingredients for my tomato sauce are garlic, salt, fresh grated pepper and fresh basil.
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Old 09-15-2009, 09:17 AM   #20
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and then, there is Cincinnati Chili... (the Mexican version reminded me)
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