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Old 08-31-2012, 08:00 PM   #111
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Plus you can eat the meat when it's all done doing dairy, and you can make shoes out of the hide. Cows: multi-use animals.
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Old 08-31-2012, 08:11 PM   #112
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There are nomadic tribes as I recall, in India and other parts, who burn well seasoned cow dung exclusively for cooking and heating.

Definitely multi-use!
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Old 08-31-2012, 08:27 PM   #113
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I don't know that I could eat the beef---I can't eat my chickens! But I could burn the cow patties!
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Old 09-04-2012, 10:07 PM   #114
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How I wish any of you could live down here for a few months. Not only are groceries expensive, but things that are commonplace in the US and Canada seem to be unheard of here. I can't even find any dry mustard, believe it or not. Invention and substitution is a way of life here.

I've literally taken a hand basket to the register and paid more than $80 for a couple of bags of stuff. That's just normal, no drought, no shortages. Is it any wonder that I'm becoming quite good at baking bread (tomorrow is Julia Child's French bread from "The Way to Cook")? And rice (plain old white rice or pilaf, not basmati or arborio or whatever) is a regular part of our diet. Except for ground chuck, beef is terribly expensive. One grocer here has an in house butcher, so we do get some ok deals on chicken and pork. Surprisingly, seafood isn't that cheap unless I catch it or spear it myself. There is a bit of agriculture on the island, so we can often find good buys on whatever produce is in season. Limes, bananas, plantains, onions, papaya, hot peppers are usually easy to come by at the right time of the year.

Even for water we are mostly dependent on what falls from the sky. Tropical storm Isaac passed just close enough to top off our 12,000 gallon cistern, so we are good for a while now. Living here has been a learning experience for us, but we wouldn't have it any other way.
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Old 10-02-2012, 08:18 AM   #115
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I was watching an episode of Chefs A' Field on PBS. I learned something. It takes 3 years to raise a grass-fed steer vs. 18 months to raise one in a feed lot. Grass-fed steer will be smaller than a grain-fed one. And, the fat is "cleaner" in taste than grain-fed beef.

BTW, you can take mustard seeds and grind your own powdered mustard. If you only have one coffee mill, to clean it before using it for spices, put white rice in it and grind away. Do this again after you use it for spices. Easy way to clean it. I have two coffee mills for spices--one for "sweet" (cloves, cinnamon, etc.); the other for "hot" (chilis, mustard, etc.).
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Old 10-02-2012, 08:28 AM   #116
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
How I wish any of you could live down here for a few months. Not only are groceries expensive, but things that are commonplace in the US and Canada seem to be unheard of here. I can't even find any dry mustard, believe it or not. Invention and substitution is a way of life here.

I've literally taken a hand basket to the register and paid more than $80 for a couple of bags of stuff. That's just normal, no drought, no shortages. Is it any wonder that I'm becoming quite good at baking bread (tomorrow is Julia Child's French bread from "The Way to Cook")? And rice (plain old white rice or pilaf, not basmati or arborio or whatever) is a regular part of our diet. Except for ground chuck, beef is terribly expensive. One grocer here has an in house butcher, so we do get some ok deals on chicken and pork. Surprisingly, seafood isn't that cheap unless I catch it or spear it myself. There is a bit of agriculture on the island, so we can often find good buys on whatever produce is in season. Limes, bananas, plantains, onions, papaya, hot peppers are usually easy to come by at the right time of the year.

Even for water we are mostly dependent on what falls from the sky. Tropical storm Isaac passed just close enough to top off our 12,000 gallon cistern, so we are good for a while now. Living here has been a learning experience for us, but we wouldn't have it any other way.
I've been to the Bahamas several times and was shocked (the first time) by the food prices. Things I thought would be cheap (pineapple, coconuts) were not. Living on an island means most things others take for granted have to be shipped in. That is true also if one lives in the North.

It makes sense to adjust what one eats to be what is locally available rather than buying things that have to be shipped in (what the locals eat). When I moved to the Maritimes as a grad student, I was dismayed that I could not buy tortillas (my go-to foods while in undergraduate school were Mexican--inexpensive, easy to prepare). I mastered making my own and have been doing so for years. But, I sure did like it when it was lobster season and lobsters were 99 cents/lb. And, the mussels and scallops were amazing. Growing up in the Midwest, I didn't eat a lot of seafood--lobster and shrimp were special treats. I hope you keep a few hens for fresh eggs <g>.
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Old 10-02-2012, 08:40 AM   #117
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Gee--no wonder I can't grow pineapple here. It takes 20 months to grow pineapple--longer than it takes to fatten a steer for market in a feed-lot...
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Old 10-02-2012, 08:44 AM   #118
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Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
Gee--no wonder I can't grow pineapple here. It takes 20 months to grow pineapple--longer than it takes to fatten a steer for market in a feed-lot...
I don't think they would be crazy about winter, too...
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Old 10-02-2012, 09:30 AM   #119
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
How I wish any of you could live down here for a few months. Not only are groceries expensive, but things that are commonplace in the US and Canada seem to be unheard of here. I can't even find any dry mustard, believe it or not. Invention and substitution is a way of life here.

I've literally taken a hand basket to the register and paid more than $80 for a couple of bags of stuff. That's just normal, no drought, no shortages. Is it any wonder that I'm becoming quite good at baking bread (tomorrow is Julia Child's French bread from "The Way to Cook")? And rice (plain old white rice or pilaf, not basmati or arborio or whatever) is a regular part of our diet. Except for ground chuck, beef is terribly expensive. One grocer here has an in house butcher, so we do get some ok deals on chicken and pork. Surprisingly, seafood isn't that cheap unless I catch it or spear it myself. There is a bit of agriculture on the island, so we can often find good buys on whatever produce is in season. Limes, bananas, plantains, onions, papaya, hot peppers are usually easy to come by at the right time of the year.

Even for water we are mostly dependent on what falls from the sky. Tropical storm Isaac passed just close enough to top off our 12,000 gallon cistern, so we are good for a while now. Living here has been a learning experience for us, but we wouldn't have it any other way.
Like our Hawaiian residents, everything has to be shipped in. Thus the cost of everything in Hawaii is twice what it costs on the mainland.
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Old 10-02-2012, 09:50 AM   #120
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
I was watching an episode of Chefs A' Field on PBS. I learned something. It takes 3 years to raise a grass-fed steer vs. 18 months to raise one in a feed lot. Grass-fed steer will be smaller than a grain-fed one. And, the fat is "cleaner" in taste than grain-fed beef.

BTW, you can take mustard seeds and grind your own powdered mustard. If you only have one coffee mill, to clean it before using it for spices, put white rice in it and grind away. Do this again after you use it for spices. Easy way to clean it. I have two coffee mills for spices--one for "sweet" (cloves, cinnamon, etc.); the other for "hot" (chilis, mustard, etc.).
Hereford steer will eat scrub and other grasses that Black Angus will not eat. You don't come to grassy plains until you get out of the southwest. But the Herford do not fatten up on scrub. They originally came from Scotland and are not native to this land. They also were field cross bred with the long horn cattle from Mexico. By nature, the Black Angus is smaller than the Herford and are hornless. Put a BA bull beside a Hereford that both have been raised on grass alone and you will see the difference. Ranchers that raise only Black Angus are willing to take the time to raise their herds on grass alone. The meat is more tender and tastier. And that way they get more $$$ per pound for their product. BA also come from Scotland.
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