"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-02-2012, 06:10 PM   #121
Head Chef
 
RPCookin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Logan County, Colorado
Posts: 2,046
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
Hereford steer will eat scrub and other grasses that Black Angus will not eat. You don't come to grassy plains until you get out of the southwest. But the Herford do not fatten up on scrub. They originally came from Scotland and are not native to this land. They also were field cross bred with the long horn cattle from Mexico. By nature, the Black Angus is smaller than the Herford and are hornless. Put a BA bull beside a Hereford that both have been raised on grass alone and you will see the difference. Ranchers that raise only Black Angus are willing to take the time to raise their herds on grass alone. The meat is more tender and tastier. And that way they get more $$$ per pound for their product. BA also come from Scotland.
My wife is a farm girl from the northeastern Colorado plains. We bought 95% of our beef on the hoof from a guy she grew up with. It was pasture raised, fed on natural feeds from the local Co-op (which was managed by his brother), on only given medications like antibiotics if actually needed (they cost money, so why not maximize profits while keeping the beef as organic as possible). He takes the beef to a local meat locker, and we order it custom cut however we want it. The meat bought this way is so much more flavorful and tender that it can't even be compared to supermarket beef. If there is anything I miss living here it's having access to that sort of red meat. It may be more healthy, but I sure miss an occasional good rib steak or post roast.

On the other hand, I can hit the ocean right in front of my house and find spiny lobster (they call then crayfish down here) or the occasional grouper (I'm still learning how to use a Hawaiian sling).
__________________

__________________
Rick
RPCookin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2012, 01:40 AM   #122
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
I was watching an episode of Chefs A' Field on PBS. I learned something. It takes 3 years to raise a grass-fed steer vs. 18 months to raise one in a feed lot. Grass-fed steer will be smaller than a grain-fed one. And, the fat is "cleaner" in taste than grain-fed beef.
I hate to say it, but a lot more vegetable protein can be raised on a smaller acreage in a shorter time than raising cows. There's no justification of eating beef if you just look at the numbers.

Anybody for a nice tofurkey or tofsteak? No, I thought not. Maybe in 1,000 years our descendents will marvel at the ancient times when people ate real animals and died before they reached 250 years old...

I'm not going to quit eating steak no matter what. I just may not eat it as often. Actually I enjoy seafood more anyway. Seafood is lots more farmable....
__________________

__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2012, 07:53 AM   #123
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,318
The availability of locally farmed seafood is not possible in some areas. However, 1/2 mi down the road, I can get organic, grass-fed beef (1/2 or 1/4 or the whole steer). The farmer who owns the farm from which the property our City house was severed, raises grass-fed (pasture) lamb. There may be no justification for eating beef, but then, there is also no justification for eating Oreos, hotdogs, or Cheese Whiz.

Responsible farmers are also custodians of the land. When looking at yield/acre, one also has to factor in the harvesting costs, equipment costs, market rate/bu., fertilization/irrigation costs, etc. So although the yield/acre may be higher, it is not always true that the rate of return/acre is worth planting a certain crop. Farmers look at the rate of return and the net return after all the expenses, including taxes, are factored in. Raising cattle may be more profitable in some areas than planting some sort of vegetable protein. Also, the soil composition, growing season, etc. may not support raising a vegetation crop, but the grass/scrub does support cattle or sheep. Farming is not that simple. The growing season may not be long enough for a vegetation crop that would potentially offer up a similar ROR. I have a great deal of respect for people who chose to be farmers. They have are often land rich but cash poor. It is not an easy life.
__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2012, 08:46 AM   #124
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,046
I agree completely with you CWS. One weather disaster can mean financial ruin for the year. For those who raise animals, an early unexpected good blizzard can mean the loss of half their herd. For farmers that choose to grown veggies and other non animal items, an early frost will just wipe out the entire crop.

I remember as a kid, listening to the radio every night starting in September. The first word of frost, we all climbed into the truck and headed for the bogs. We often were there until late at night flooding them. A successful flood meant that there would be a crop next year. The next day a lot desks at school were empty. You just knew they were doing the same thing you were doing late at night and were just too tired to get up and go to school. If you are a member of a farming family, everybody is a farmer in that family. the happiest time of my childhood was spent on the farm. It was hard work, but I loved it. I understood at a very early age, just how important all the work was.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2012, 09:04 AM   #125
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
We are part of this world. And as such, we interact with all other living, and non-living things. If we eat anything, we are killing some type of life form, be it plant or animal. That's just the way it is. It is our responsibility to use the resources available to us in such a way that we improve that resource, so that it is available to our posterity.

Intensive grazing is one way to do that. This livestock technique is patterned after Africa's great savannahs, that support the richest diversity of grazing, and predator life per acre, on the planet.

With this type of farming, different grazing animals utilize the same pastures throughout the grazing season, with each animal grazing in its own pasture and eating something different from that pasture. The animals are rotated at a regular schedule, each eating its own type of plants, or insects, or rodents, which is different for each critter. In this way, weeds and insects are controlled, the soil is fertilized by each animal's unique droppings, and the none of the pastures are overgrazed. There are fewer individual types of animals per acre, but as many total animals. Typically, cattle, pigs, chickens, and goats or sheep are the animals that share the pastures.

Where this type of grazing is utilized, the animals are healthier, better tasting, and contribute to the quality of, rather than using up the available postural resources. And because they are healthier, they need less anitbiotics, and such. Only minerals need to be added to teh soil from time to time. It's a sustainable farming method that is being utilized more and more. And that's a good thing.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2012, 09:49 AM   #126
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,885
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
We are part of this world. And as such, we interact with all other living, and non-living things. If we eat anything, we are killing some type of life form, be it plant or animal. That's just the way it is. It is our responsibility to use the resources available to us in such a way that we improve that resource, so that it is available to our posterity.

Intensive grazing is one way to do that. This livestock technique is patterned after Africa's great savannahs, that support the richest diversity of grazing, and predator life per acre, on the planet.

With this type of farming, different grazing animals utilize the same pastures throughout the grazing season, with each animal grazing in its own pasture and eating something different from that pasture. The animals are rotated at a regular schedule, each eating its own type of plants, or insects, or rodents, which is different for each critter. In this way, weeds and insects are controlled, the soil is fertilized by each animal's unique droppings, and the none of the pastures are overgrazed. There are fewer individual types of animals per acre, but as many total animals. Typically, cattle, pigs, chickens, and goats or sheep are the animals that share the pastures.

Where this type of grazing is utilized, the animals are healthier, better tasting, and contribute to the quality of, rather than using up the available postural resources. And because they are healthier, they need less anitbiotics, and such. Only minerals need to be added to teh soil from time to time. It's a sustainable farming method that is being utilized more and more. And that's a good thing.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Thank you Chief. I was going to write something along those lines, but you did it well and saved me the effort.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2012, 10:04 AM   #127
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
Thank you Chief. I was going to write something along those lines, but you did it well and saved me the effort.
My pleasure.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2012, 11:40 AM   #128
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,318
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
We are part of this world. And as such, we interact with all other living, and non-living things. If we eat anything, we are killing some type of life form, be it plant or animal. That's just the way it is. It is our responsibility to use the resources available to us in such a way that we improve that resource, so that it is available to our posterity.

Intensive grazing is one way to do that. This livestock technique is patterned after Africa's great savannahs, that support the richest diversity of grazing, and predator life per acre, on the planet.

With this type of farming, different grazing animals utilize the same pastures throughout the grazing season, with each animal grazing in its own pasture and eating something different from that pasture. The animals are rotated at a regular schedule, each eating its own type of plants, or insects, or rodents, which is different for each critter. In this way, weeds and insects are controlled, the soil is fertilized by each animal's unique droppings, and the none of the pastures are overgrazed. There are fewer individual types of animals per acre, but as many total animals. Typically, cattle, pigs, chickens, and goats or sheep are the animals that share the pastures.

Where this type of grazing is utilized, the animals are healthier, better tasting, and contribute to the quality of, rather than using up the available postural resources. And because they are healthier, they need less anitbiotics, and such. Only minerals need to be added to teh soil from time to time. It's a sustainable farming method that is being utilized more and more. And that's a good thing.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
+1
__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2012, 12:09 PM   #129
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,046
Greg as the widow of a commercial fisherman, I love seafood. But they are finding that those seafood farms are developing some major problems. They are more prone to disease, do not grow as big as wild ones., etc. And these problems go across the board. Whether it be catfish, oysters, clams, salmon, etc. When you take an animal out of the wild and try to get it to change according to your needs, you are just preparing for disaster.

Farmers know this. They do try to get a bigger yield from their plantings. And when the big coops change the DNA of crops, they are just making them more susceptible to disease and more attractive to bugs and other critters. The small farmer like CWS and her husband are caught in a bind. They have no choice but to buy the seeds from these altered plants. Thus all the problems are hoisted on them. Small farmers try not to use pesticides. But sometimes it is their only means to get a crop at all. Just look at what we have done to corn. When you look at the cobs found in old Native American sites, they are tiny. But there is no mold on them. And little critters didn't find them to be a banquet. Now the bigger the better. When we go shopping, we always pick out the big ones. More for our money. I would rather have a small tender one. They are sweeter and have more corn milk in them. That is where all the flavor is.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2012, 06:09 PM   #130
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,318
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
Greg as the widow of a commercial fisherman, I love seafood. But they are finding that those seafood farms are developing some major problems. They are more prone to disease, do not grow as big as wild ones., etc. And these problems go across the board. Whether it be catfish, oysters, clams, salmon, etc. When you take an animal out of the wild and try to get it to change according to your needs, you are just preparing for disaster.

Farmers know this. They do try to get a bigger yield from their plantings. And when the big coops change the DNA of crops, they are just making them more susceptible to disease and more attractive to bugs and other critters. The small farmer like CWS and her husband are caught in a bind. They have no choice but to buy the seeds from these altered plants. Thus all the problems are hoisted on them. Small farmers try not to use pesticides. But sometimes it is their only means to get a crop at all. Just look at what we have done to corn. When you look at the cobs found in old Native American sites, they are tiny. But there is no mold on them. And little critters didn't find them to be a banquet. Now the bigger the better. When we go shopping, we always pick out the big ones. More for our money. I would rather have a small tender one. They are sweeter and have more corn milk in them. That is where all the flavor is.
Thanks, Addie. Our farm is for our consumption only, but it is a farm and requires a lot of work. We don't use pesticides. We had to irrigate this year and still lost stuff. The rain (now we get rain!) is making it hard to get the winter wheat planted to restore the nutrient balance in the field that we left fallow this summer. We'd like to plant sunflowers in it next summer (the deer don't bother sunflowers--and we can supplement the hens' feed with sunflowers). But, it would help if we could get the winter wheat planted because we had corn in that field 2 summers ago. We are investigating growing quinoa...it might grow here if we don't have too many days over 90 degrees in the summer. My brother and I disagree on this self-sustainability thing--"it's easier to go to the store and buy your groceries." Easier, yes, but we don't just grow what we eat during the summer, we feed the dogs ground veggies and feed ourselves.
__________________

__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
food

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:24 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.