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Old 10-12-2012, 01:58 PM   #131
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North
We are part of this world. And as such, we interact with all other living, and non-living things. If we eat anything, we are killing some type of life form, be it plant or animal. That's just the way it is. It is our responsibility to use the resources available to us in such a way that we improve that resource, so that it is available to our posterity.

Intensive grazing is one way to do that. This livestock technique is patterned after Africa's great savannahs, that support the richest diversity of grazing, and predator life per acre, on the planet.

With this type of farming, different grazing animals utilize the same pastures throughout the grazing season, with each animal grazing in its own pasture and eating something different from that pasture. The animals are rotated at a regular schedule, each eating its own type of plants, or insects, or rodents, which is different for each critter. In this way, weeds and insects are controlled, the soil is fertilized by each animal's unique droppings, and the none of the pastures are overgrazed. There are fewer individual types of animals per acre, but as many total animals. Typically, cattle, pigs, chickens, and goats or sheep are the animals that share the pastures.

Where this type of grazing is utilized, the animals are healthier, better tasting, and contribute to the quality of, rather than using up the available postural resources. And because they are healthier, they need less anitbiotics, and such. Only minerals need to be added to teh soil from time to time. It's a sustainable farming method that is being utilized more and more. And that's a good thing.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
+1

I've been thinking along these lines for awhile, but this is much more organized and well written than what would have come from my general ideas. I used to work at a group home that had cattle, an we rotated them between 4 pastures. All you had to do was open the gate, and they went through. That's where all the fresh grass was!! So it required almost no effort, we didn't have to buy hay or grain, so there were no fossil fuels being used, and no 3rd party being paid for harvesting. They were not standing in a foot of their own waste like at factory farms, so they were naturally healthy, and there was no run off going into local rivers and streams. Doesn't this just sound better??
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Old 10-12-2012, 04:09 PM   #132
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Originally Posted by Skittle68 View Post
+1

I've been thinking along these lines for awhile, but this is much more organized and well written than what would have come from my general ideas. I used to work at a group home that had cattle, an we rotated them between 4 pastures. All you had to do was open the gate, and they went through. That's where all the fresh grass was!! So it required almost no effort, we didn't have to buy hay or grain, so there were no fossil fuels being used, and no 3rd party being paid for harvesting. They were not standing in a foot of their own waste like at factory farms, so they were naturally healthy, and there was no run off going into local rivers and streams. Doesn't this just sound better??
+1

In the US, people spend approx. 6% of their income on food; in Canada it is 9%. In other countries it is as high as 46%. Think about it.
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Old 10-12-2012, 04:42 PM   #133
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+1

In the US, people spend approx. 6% of their income on food; in Canada it is 9%. In other countries it is as high as 46%. Think about it.
That statistic isn't completely accurate, because money is taken out of our income and used to subsidize farms, so we think food is cheap, but it actually isn't. That number is probably quite a bit higher if you take into account our tax money that is spent on subsidies.
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Old 10-12-2012, 05:05 PM   #134
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I don't care what they are paying our farmers for subsidies. Every cent is well worth it. It all comes back to me with high quality food.

Having lived on a farm as a kid, I know how hard farmers work. Last night we had a frost warning. That meant those on our South Shore and the Cape, had to leave the warmth of their homes and get the cranberry bogs flooded in order to save them. The whole family was probably there until way past midnight. And then they got up this morning and went off to school or work. When they get home tonight, they still have farm work to do. So next Thanksgiving, you will have cranberry sauce on your table.

Most small farmers have a second job other than the farm. And if the wife doesn't work outside the home, she is probably doing the outside chores that her husband does when he is home. And I am not referring to mowing the lawn. So in a sense, she has two jobs also. Farm chores and taking care of her family and home.
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Old 10-12-2012, 05:23 PM   #135
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That statistic isn't completely accurate, because money is taken out of our income and used to subsidize farms, so we think food is cheap, but it actually isn't. That number is probably quite a bit higher if you take into account our tax money that is spent on subsidies.
The US has some of the lowest personal income tax rates in the Western world. The taxes taken off a paycheck that goes to subsidize farming is small a portion of where one's tax dollar is spent. For example, in Ontario, 46% of every dollar one pays for taxes goes for health care. That doesn't leave a lot for all the other programs--security, infrastructure, disability subsidies, etc. The farmers in Ontario are receiving donated hay from western provinces. This hay is being shipped east thanks to donations from the public, not as a "government" subsidized program.

Skittle--did you get the little cookbook I sent your way?
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Old 10-12-2012, 08:56 PM   #136
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Originally Posted by Skittle68 View Post
That statistic isn't completely accurate, because money is taken out of our income and used to subsidize farms, so we think food is cheap, but it actually isn't. That number is probably quite a bit higher if you take into account our tax money that is spent on subsidies.
There's also the fact that if you make $4,000 a year you'll spend a huge amount of your income on food, compared to people who make $50,000 or $100,000 a year (even though they eat more expensive food). That explain's a large part of the third world vs. first world percent of income spent on food statistic.
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Old 10-13-2012, 11:29 AM   #137
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Addie, I completely agree that they deserve every penny. However, I do wish they would put more of the money into fruits and veggies instead of corn, meat, and dairy.

CWS- yes I got the cookbook! Thank you!! I've looked through it, and I can't wait to try a few of the recipes when I get time.

And Greg, that is a good point too! I'm sure I spend a huge percentage of my money of food compared to someone in the top 1%. The register at the grocery store makes me cringe every time.
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Old 10-13-2012, 12:29 PM   #138
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Addie, I completely agree that they deserve every penny. However, I do wish they would put more of the money into fruits and veggies instead of corn, meat, and dairy.

CWS- yes I got the cookbook! Thank you!! I've looked through it, and I can't wait to try a few of the recipes when I get time.

And Greg, that is a good point too! I'm sure I spend a huge percentage of my money of food compared to someone in the top 1%. The register at the grocery store makes me cringe every time.
Corn is used in so many ways, Fuel, animal feed, etc. Let the companies that depend on the corn for their business be the ones to subsidize the corn farmer. Vermont at one time had more cows than people. Now those farms no longer have barns on the land. Only condos for folks who want to experience the country life. Next it was Wisconsin and the same thing happened. Now it is California.
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