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Old 07-23-2012, 08:36 AM   #31
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In NC we are in a moderate drought condition. 'Course we had some very heavy rain most of the day on Saturday. Not enough to break a drought. Unfortunately we will likely need a tropical storm or hurricane to really bring enough water here to help.

Ain't that a fine choice to have to make? Prayin' for a hurricane or gettin dried up and blown away. Still, I think we will squeak by, cropwise.
Don't the Mormons advocate keepin' a year's supply of food on hand, or was that some other group? Don't matter who it was, I reckon it's something we all might need to look at.
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Old 07-23-2012, 09:08 AM   #32
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In NC we are in a moderate drought condition. 'Course we had some very heavy rain most of the day on Saturday. Not enough to break a drought. Unfortunately we will likely need a tropical storm or hurricane to really bring enough water here to help.

Ain't that a fine choice to have to make? Prayin' for a hurricane or gettin dried up and blown away. Still, I think we will squeak by, cropwise.
Don't the Mormons advocate keepin' a year's supply of food on hand, or was that some other group? Don't matter who it was, I reckon it's something we all might need to look at.
Yes it is the Mormons. I had a girlfriend in Tacoma and she along with her mother practiced it. Her mother said you would never see a Mormon on welfare. They take care of their own and there is always enough food in the community to help others. Not a bad practice. When I went to Spokane, to visit her mother she was canning a crate of tomatoes. She showed me her cellar where she had all her canning and other dry good stored. Every month she would rotate them so that the oldest got used first. I think it is a great practice.
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Old 07-23-2012, 10:01 AM   #33
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In my collection of 1000+ cookbooks, I was just reading "A Family Raised on Sunshine" which is written by Beverly K. Nye. It includes the "plan" for storing one-year's worth of food, including the wheat to grind one's own flour. We end up with about nine months' worth of veggies once the garden is done. But definitely don't have a year's worth and we do have to go the grocery store regularly.

In her book, she does something neat re: storing empty canning jars--she refills them with water and seals them (so--cans water). This way, the water requirement gets met, and the jars are clean for the next year--that part I like!
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Old 07-23-2012, 10:28 AM   #34
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I am seriously considering stockpiling some food items for the coming winter. With the drought in Eastern Canada and some of the US, you can bet the food prices will rise. I am thinking flour, cornmeal, beef, chicken for sure. Maybe canola oil. Anything else be affected by the drought?
Any livestock or livestock products from animals that eat corn. Think milk, cream, goose, veal, beef, pork, chicken, eggs, etc. Stock up on canned or frozen sweet corn, or corn products that you use, including some salsa's, corn meal, masa harina, etc.

By the way, that's good thinking.

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Old 07-23-2012, 03:08 PM   #35
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I am happy to report that here in Massachusetts, when we are in drought conditions, the first edict to come our way is "No lawn watering." And "No car washing."

A couple of years ago Lake Lanier in Georgia went down considerably. My girlfriend has a cottage and in normal conditions the water comes right up to her dock and is quite deep. During the last major drought they had to walk five minutes to get to the water. The lake still hasn't recovered fully. And now it is starting to recede again.
No watering of lawns here. Normally we are only allowed to water lawns in the evening and only on certain days, depending on your house number.

In Denmark, when there is a drought, you can still water your lawn. You can water anything you want to water, as along as you water by hand and don't use a hose. I'm sure they have different rules for farmers.
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Old 07-23-2012, 04:46 PM   #36
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Yes it is the Mormons. I had a girlfriend in Tacoma and she along with her mother practiced it. Her mother said you would never see a Mormon on welfare. They take care of their own and there is always enough food in the community to help others. Not a bad practice. When I went to Spokane, to visit her mother she was canning a crate of tomatoes. She showed me her cellar where she had all her canning and other dry good stored. Every month she would rotate them so that the oldest got used first. I think it is a great practice.
Yup. I am a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (the Mormons), and we do try to keep a stockpile of food essentials around in case of things like drought, blizzards, hurricanes, and other disasters, natural, or man-made. It just makes sense. Originally, we were advised to keep a two year supply of food, water, and fuel. As that is very difficult for many, the amount has been reduced.

Foods to keep are things like rice, wheat, dried legumes, honey, sugar, freeze-dried, or dehydrated foods, seasonings, etc. We are also advised to plant and keep gardens, and can the foods we grow, if possible.

Way too many things can disrupt the food supply. It just makes sense. I have some foods, but not what I should have. My garden is doing very well right now, and so I am starting to purchase canning supplies, and enjoying the fruits of my early labor.

The idea of stockpiling is to give yourself a nutritious cache of food for emergencies that is worth eating. It doesn't need to be gourmet, but has to be good enough to eat for a good period of time.

I personally know of several people, including me and my family, who have lived off of food storage when between jobs (such as when i was out fresh out of the Navy, living in Spokane, with no jobs available during the recession of 82/83). You never know when the unexpected can rise up and hit you. It's a good idea.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 07-23-2012, 04:49 PM   #37
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I like stockpiling food even if for no other reason than convenience. For example, if you use chicken stock and you see it on sale, why not buy a dozen cans? Then the next dozen times you need it you won't have to put it on your shopping list, or take another 1-2 minutes to add it to your shopping cart.
I agree with this completely. I'm pretty good about rotating and remembering what needs to get used so that things don't get old, but I still feel like my bf must think I'm crazy to have so much food for two people. But if cream soup is on sale, I buy a bunch. It will get used, and that way I never pay the normal store price.
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Old 07-23-2012, 05:11 PM   #38
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I agree with this completely. I'm pretty good about rotating and remembering what needs to get used so that things don't get old, but I still feel like my bf must think I'm crazy to have so much food for two people. But if cream soup is on sale, I buy a bunch. It will get used, and that way I never pay the normal store price.
That's the second comment in this discussion about rotation so I decided to add a few words on the subject.

There are two kinds of inventory systems, LIFO and FIFO. Last In First Out is often used for convenience when the product lasts indefinitely (perhaps nails or bricks), you put items on the shelf and push them to the back if you need more room. First In First Out is the preferred method for perishable items, even long term items such as canned foods. You can either add new items at the back of the shelf and remove off the front, or vice versa. With this system you're always using the oldest product first. (I suppose there's a third system: random, often adopted with people who aren't control freaks. )

I like to put new items at the back of the shelf so the oldest item is conveniently located at the front of the shelf when I need it. I also like to use a permanent marker and mark the month and year on the can, bottle or package. (Example: currently 712.) Then if there is any uncertainty which item is oldest I can just look at my markings. (This is a lot easier than having to find use-by or made-on markings since they vary from product to product.)

I'm curious if anybody has any system other than add to the back remove from the front, or vice versa.
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Old 07-23-2012, 05:36 PM   #39
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That's the second comment in this discussion about rotation so I decided to add a few words on the subject.

There are two kinds of inventory systems, LIFO and FIFO. Last In First Out is often used for convenience when the product lasts indefinitely (perhaps nails or bricks), you put items on the shelf and push them to the back if you need more room. First In First Out is the preferred method for perishable items, even long term items such as canned foods. You can either add new items at the back of the shelf and remove off the front, or vice versa. With this system you're always using the oldest product first. (I suppose there's a third system: random, often adopted with people who aren't control freaks. )

I like to put new items at the back of the shelf so the oldest item is conveniently located at the front of the shelf when I need it. I also like to use a permanent marker and mark the month and year on the can, bottle or package. (Example: currently 712.) Then if there is any uncertainty which item is oldest I can just look at my markings. (This is a lot easier than having to find use-by or made-on markings since they vary from product to product.)

I'm curious if anybody has any system other than add to the back remove from the front, or vice versa.
I use the FIFO method. New items go to the back, and freezer items get dated with a marker. Not a bad idea to mark pantry items too tho. I keep everything in a pretty meticulous order- soups and vegetables each have their own row on the shelf, label facing out, but I can just picture my bf rummaging through, seeing if there are different kinds in the back lol. He is sort of a bull in a china shop sometimes. I could pretty much tell you where everything is in the freezer too. Everything has has it's own spot lol
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Old 07-23-2012, 05:47 PM   #40
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Actually I can't imagine anybody storing food using any system other than FIFO.

I use the same date marking system in my pantry too, and in fact on practically everything food related unless it's something like coffee filters which of course don't matter.

Using some sort of date marking is particularly important for spices, and for bottled items like sauces that you keep in your refrigerator. I've sometimes found items at the back of my fridge that were 3-5 years old! Needless to say I threw them out.
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