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Old 03-18-2009, 11:58 AM   #21
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ALL SALTS are around 99% sodium chloride and have the same saltiness per unit of weight, though not by measure volume because of grain size.

Yes. It's important to remember that all salt is essentially the same, and is equally salty.

The difference in salts is found in the size of the grain and the addition of iodine in table salt and the naturally occurring minerals and other "sea stuff" in sea salt.

You can certainly bake and cook with sea salt.

Personally I never do because sea salt is relatively expensive and there's no benefit in using it. The subtle taste differences in sea salt are lost when you bake with it or use it in a cooked dish. I use it almost exclusively as a finishing salt. I do have a table shaker of sea salt that someone gave me, so I use that but won't replace it.

Otherwise it's kosher salt for pretty much everything.
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Old 03-18-2009, 02:54 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
Yes. It's important to remember that all salt is essentially the same, and is equally salty.

The difference in salts is found in the size of the grain and the addition of iodine in table salt and the naturally occurring minerals and other "sea stuff" in sea salt.
Not just Iodine. Table salt also contains anti caking agents and sugar, of all things.
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You can certainly bake and cook with sea salt.

Personally I never do because sea salt is relatively expensive and there's no benefit in using it. The subtle taste differences in sea salt are lost when you bake with it or use it in a cooked dish. I use it almost exclusively as a finishing salt. I do have a table shaker of sea salt that someone gave me, so I use that but won't replace it.

Otherwise it's kosher salt for pretty much everything.
I do keep kosher salt around and use it for cooking. My problem with it for baking is measuring it. I tried for some time but never found a conversion ratio for replacing table salt with kosher salt. I decided using a table salt grind sea salt for my baking was worth the cost since it allowed me simple measurements and avoided the additives in table salt.
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Old 03-18-2009, 03:21 PM   #23
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Not just Iodine. Table salt also contains anti caking agents and sugar, of all things.
I do keep kosher salt around and use it for cooking. My problem with it for baking is measuring it. I tried for some time but never found a conversion ratio for replacing table salt with kosher salt. I decided using a table salt grind sea salt for my baking was worth the cost since it allowed me simple measurements and avoided the additives in table salt.
The standard conversion for table to kosher is 1: 1 1/2 for Morton's Kosher and 1:2 for Diamond Crystal.

kosher table conversion diamond morton's - Google Search

But kosher salt doesn't dissolve as well as table salt so isn't as good for baking.

I don't mind the additives in table salt when baking. The iodine and dextrose don't change the taste, with the one exception being perhaps bread.

I usually use kosher salt when baking because I'm lazy. It's right there in the crock and the table salt is across the kitchen in the cupboard.
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Old 03-18-2009, 04:54 PM   #24
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A soup that I made yesterday called for "Gray Salt," which I've never seen. I read that it's trendy the last couple of years but that there may be some controversy about it?
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Old 03-18-2009, 05:02 PM   #25
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A soup that I made yesterday called for "Gray Salt," which I've never seen. I read that it's trendy the last couple of years but that there may be some controversy about it?

Grey salt is an expensive type of sea salt.

If it was called for in your recipe, I hope it was as a finishing salt, and not a seasoning salt. There is absolutely no need to season with something like that.

You need not finish with it either if you don't want to spend $$
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Old 03-18-2009, 05:08 PM   #26
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A soup that I made yesterday called for "Gray Salt," which I've never seen. I read that it's trendy the last couple of years but that there may be some controversy about it?

Sounds like a Michael Chiarello (Napa Style) recipe. He uses grey salt for everything.

Jennyema is right on. You can make a delicious soup without it.
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Old 03-18-2009, 06:39 PM   #27
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The standard conversion for table to kosher is 1: 1 1/2 for Morton's Kosher and 1:2 for Diamond Crystal.

kosher table conversion diamond morton's - Google Search

But kosher salt doesn't dissolve as well as table salt so isn't as good for baking.

I don't mind the additives in table salt when baking. The iodine and dextrose don't change the taste, with the one exception being perhaps bread.

I usually use kosher salt when baking because I'm lazy. It's right there in the crock and the table salt is across the kitchen in the cupboard.
Thanks, that's the conversion ratio I was looking for. But I guess I'll stay with RealSalt for my baking (mostly breads), as I believe it's smaller grains allow it to dissolve better. Besides, since I only use it for baking, a bag goes a long way and it really isn't all that expensive when I think about it in terms of cost per loaf.
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Old 03-19-2009, 05:29 AM   #28
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But you can't deny that finishing with a "grey" salt, or any other high-quality sea salt, definitely makes your taste buds sing. It adds something extra that is more than just saltiness ... they have unique, subtle flavors.
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Old 03-19-2009, 07:33 AM   #29
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I've use Pink Himalayan salt, have a look at the link, it's healthier for you

Himalayan Salt - The Purest Salt on Earth with Amazing Health Benefits
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Old 03-19-2009, 07:45 AM   #30
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I'm more than a little skeptical about the claims made on that site. It's salt - Sodium Chloride.
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