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Old 03-16-2009, 05:37 PM   #1
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Substituting Salts in bread recipe - need help

we only have sea salt in the house - prefer it over the regular stuff

but now im baking (which i dont do often) irish soda bread, and it obviously calls for a bit of salt (1 1/2 tsp)

does anyone know what the conversion would be?? i would rather not buy table salt that im not going to use

thanks!

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Old 03-16-2009, 05:52 PM   #2
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It's difficult to give a conversion without knowing the size of the sea salt grains as compared to the table salt. Ideally. you can grind some in a mini blender or mortar and pestle to approximate the grain size of table salt. Then you can measure more accurately.

Other than grain size differences, the two salts have the same saltiness.
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Old 03-16-2009, 05:55 PM   #3
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I'm going to disagree but it's just my tastes. I think sea salt is "saltier" and stronger in flavor. For baking I would NEVER substitute sea salt for table salt. I don't know many that would. For $.50 I would buy a can of Morton's and store it for future baking. It lasts forever, even longer than sugar. Oh, and you can kill snails and slugs with Morton's too.
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Old 03-16-2009, 05:57 PM   #4
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There is no conversion that works for all types of sea salt. it all depends upon the grind of the salt that you have. This screwed me up for some time as I was trying to learn to bake bread and had only sea salt and kosher salt in the house. you could get a scale, but if you do, make sure it's accurate to tenths of a gram. What I use now is RealSalt, a sea salt with a table salt grind.
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Old 03-16-2009, 06:05 PM   #5
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The issues is also breakdown of amount of salt to mass ratio. You need to make sure the salt blends evenly with the entire batter/dough mixture. Large chunks will glop in places were small crystals disperse throughout.
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Old 03-16-2009, 06:38 PM   #6
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Isn't all salt (except salt produced in a labs chemical reaction) Sea Salt?
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Old 03-16-2009, 07:06 PM   #7
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Yes, but there's so many different tastes to "sea salt". It now comes from Morton's and etc. in a regular table grind, available in most, if not all, stores. I always use sea salt unless the recipe calls for kosher; there is a difference. Also, there are two classes of sea salt - cooking and finishing. Never intermix the two as they are entirely different.
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Old 03-16-2009, 07:07 PM   #8
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I used sea salt in cookies once, and it did not work out at all. It was the only salt I had on hand at the time, and I thought it would not work, but it was sea salt or no salt. So I decided to go with the sea salt. Taking a bite of a cookie and getting a piece of sea salt is not tasty, which cookies should be. So moral of the story is have more than sea salt on hand. I use sea salt as a finishing for foods, when you want to see the salt.
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Old 03-16-2009, 07:26 PM   #9
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You've got to grind it!
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Old 03-16-2009, 07:39 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dave the baker View Post
You've got to grind it!
Yeah, but even so, it's still not the best baking product.
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