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Old 02-09-2009, 04:30 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Jeff G. View Post
I think it has something to do with humidity.. I don't know if there is anything you can do about it.
Jeff I was just fixin to add before I was rudely interrupted by my electrical power blinking off and on.. Humidity does in fact play a role when making meringues...It seems that on damp, rainy days when the humidity is high the sugar in the meringue can absorb moisture causing it to soften...So there is some truth to the old saying ...Not to make a meringue on rainy, damp days, or where there is a humid enviroment. It would be my guess however that in modern houses where the temperature/humity is controlled that it wouldn't have to much affect....

Now I want PIE!!!!! Chocolate PIE!!!
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Old 02-09-2009, 07:09 PM   #12
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Jeff I was just fixin to add before I was rudely interrupted by my electrical power blinking off and on.. Humidity does in fact play a role when making meringues...It seems that on damp, rainy days when the humidity is high the sugar in the meringue can absorb moisture causing it to soften...So there is some truth to the old saying ...Not to make a meringue on rainy, damp days, or where there is a humid enviroment. It would be my guess however that in modern houses where the temperature/humity is controlled that it wouldn't have to much affect....

Now I want PIE!!!!! Chocolate PIE!!!
Personally... I am thinking Butterscotch!!!!! NOW!!!!
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Old 02-10-2009, 11:52 AM   #13
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It was a coconut pie. For the meringue part, the recipe just says "bake it until brown." OK......so that might be the problem.....BROWN..... completely brown like burn, half brown, or lightly brown? I guess mine was half brown, so it might be undercooked according miniman and overcooked according to Uncle Bob, as well as too much humidity according to Jeff G. Oh, man, I can send my pie to experiment station at a science center??
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Old 02-10-2009, 01:29 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by chueh
I can send my pie to experiment station at a science center??
You donít need to do that! -- Next time try this...Mix 1 Tbls of Corn Starch with 1/3 cup water...and heat until it forms a slightly thick paste. Beat your egg whites, adding the sugar a few Tbls at a time until you began to have stiff peaks...Turn you mixer speed down to very low and add the cornstarch paste 1 Tbls at a time until itís all incorporated. Then turn the mixer speed back up for 10 seconds or so. Spread the meringue over your HOT pie filling....Bake in a 425*/450* oven for 5 or 6 minutes. This should stabilize your meringue, lower the chances of beading on top, and weeping from between the meringue and filling. The meringue should be tender and easy to cut. HTH


Have Fun!
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Old 02-10-2009, 07:43 PM   #15
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This was my first time making meringue. The sugary syrup has woozed out more and more from the pores of meringue ever since I finished baking. Is it normal?
Hi Chueh,

There are 3 distinct types of meringue which might be made. Now, apologies first as I live in the UK and can never rememeber exactly how my sugar terminology translates to US terminology. Perhaps, someone could help me out here - please.

Anyway, the three types of meringue are:

1. Meringue Suisse - made from whisking egg whites until stiff but still gossy, adding 1/3 of the CASTER sugar, whisking again and adding the next third, whisking and just adding the final third until the sugar is incorporated through the mix. The usual proportions for this mix is 50g caster sugar per egg white plus a touch of cream of tartar which should be added to the egg white when you begin whisking.

2. Meringue Cuite - my personal favourite, as the mixer does all the work. Place 2 egg whites in the mixer and add 4.5 oz ICING sugar. Lower the whisk into the bowl, start on a slow speed and increase and allow the mixer to do the work until you have a rich, glossy mix which holds its shape and you should be able to turn the bowl upside down over your head and nothing drips! this mix can be done in a bowl, suspended over a pot of gently simmering water using a hand whisk.

3. Meringue Italienne which is made be first preparing a sugar and water syrup boiled to 260FF and poured onto whisked egg whites and whisked again.


Meringues, such as one would have for afternoon tea, sandwiched with cream are cooked by "drying out" - literally removing moisture, so the temperature has to be low - 100C/200F or lower if possible, to enable the egg white to coagulate and hold the sugar in suspension. If the oven temperature is too high, the egg white proteins will coagulate and the sugar will be expelled from the mix giving the "beading effect".

For an item like a pie topped with meringue, cook the meringue at 130C/250F/Gas 1/2 for about 30 minutes to brown the meringue and give a crisp top.

Meringue is hygroscopic - i.e., it loves mositure, so if you make a lemon meringue pie and leave the meringue on top for too long before serving, it will absorb liquid from the filling below and wilt/soften. Consequently, if you want to make a lemon meringue pie, it should be finished about 1 hour in advance. Alternatively, make the pie crust in advance and store, filling in advance (chill and store) and chill and then assemble, top with meringue and bake I hour before serving. A meringue topped pie does not keep but by choosing when you combine the ingredients you can make with ease.

Adding cornflour/cornstarch and vinegar to the mixture will give you a Pavlova but it will not give you a meringue. It will be marshmallow in the centre.

Also, using a chef`s torch to brown the meringue will not cook the mixture to make it safe in terms of edibility for some people - it just browns the top as a result of the Maillard reaction between sugars and proteins - same reaction as making toast! Certain Uk based chefs have suggested that it is, but experiments by colleagues on another messageboard have demonstrated that the egg white mix does not a reach sufficient internal temperature to render it safe for particular client groups such as pregnant women.

Hope this helps,
Archiduc
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Old 02-10-2009, 07:56 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by chueh View Post
This was my first time making meringue. The sugary syrup has woozed out more and more from the pores of meringue ever since I finished baking. Is it normal?
Can't offer much help as I haven't made a meringue pie for decades. However, my mom made them quite often. The beads of sugar always appeared after a day or two, but they tasted fine and as a kid I thought they looked delicious.

Anyway, this site has some good information on meringues: CLICKY They say meringue will bead and weep if stored in the refrigerator.

Also, I think I read recently that beading is a sign that the meringue was overcooked, but I can't find that reference so I can't be sure.

Found this recipe -- from the comments, it's weep-proof: CLICKY
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Old 02-11-2009, 09:14 AM   #17
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Hi, guys! Weeping meringue is caused by the water in the egg whites leaching out. This happens when your whites aren't completely cooked all the way through. To prevent weeping, shrinking and all the other things that can go squirrely with meringue, start with a cooked meringue or "Italian meringue." This is made by whipping a sugar syrup that you've heated to about 248 degrees, F, into the whites. There are good recipes out there, so just do a search for "Italian meringue." Once it's done, you can swoosh it all over a pie and then brown it in the oven. You could also try using "seven minute frosting" for a meringue. I think that would work well, too.
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Old 02-11-2009, 02:02 PM   #18
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Odd I wonder how unsafe the uncooked merangue is.
We ate it quite often on top of our floating Islands..

Custard with meringue floating on top.
I have noticed there are many recipes. Half use a cooked meringue of some type, half that use uncooked meringue..
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Old 02-11-2009, 02:31 PM   #19
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all sound good to me. Thank you for all your helps
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Old 02-11-2009, 05:00 PM   #20
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Hi, Jeff G :)

I would say that, generally speaking, there is very little chance of getting sick from undercooked egg whites, especially if you have a healthy immune system. If you're going to top a pie w/a simple meringue (uncooked) and have some concerns, use pasteurized eggs, just to be on the safe side.
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