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Old 09-03-2014, 07:44 PM   #11
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I've picked wild blueberries. I've eaten commercial blueberries. They're okay. I can't be bothered. There are too many other kinds of berries that taste better.

If you can find them frozen MC, that would probably be your best bet in terms of buying them. They will have been frozen within a short time of harvesting and have lost the least flavour.
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Old 09-03-2014, 07:47 PM   #12
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I really love the little wild ones that I grew up with in Maine. Luckily I can get them frozen here, I love them in coffee cake and pancakes

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Old 09-03-2014, 09:14 PM   #13
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What makes the wild blueberries so great along the eastern part of the country is that it is the soil that is just the Allegheny Mountains ground down. They are older than the Rocky Mountains. It is all those minerals contained in the rocks that make the soil perfect.

One year my sister dug up a couple of small baby blueberry bushes from alongside of the road to transplant in her yard. Then they got hit with a hard frost and it killed them. I told her to cover them with plastic bags. But did she listen? Noooo! What do I know. I am only the baby sister. There are tall bushes and short ones close to the ground. The tall bushes have the sweetest berries. Those are the wild ones. Most of the blueberry farms have the short bushes. It saves on labor costs for pruning.
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Old 09-03-2014, 09:18 PM   #14
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The wild blueberry bushes I have seen were less than two feet tall. They seem to do well enough through hard Quebec winters with no help.
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Old 09-03-2014, 09:24 PM   #15
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The wild ones we used to pick in Canada were really tiny too, and very sweet and delicious. Scrubby little things.
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Old 09-03-2014, 09:26 PM   #16
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The wild blueberry bushes I have seen were less than two feet tall. They seem to do well enough through hard Quebec winters with no help.
The bushes that grow in NH and MA tend to be taller. I would imagine the ones in Maine are smaller. Their winter weather is more to that of Canada than the rest of our country.
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Old 09-03-2014, 09:36 PM   #17
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MC, if you can't find flavorful fresh ones, look for dried ones in your grocery store. They mix into scone batter nicely and plump up from the moisture in the batter. Just be sure to add a tablespoon or two extra of cream to allow for the plumping.

I love fresh blueberries when they have a good flavor. I just wash them up and pop them into my mouth like M&Ms! The cultivated ones. I've never been able to enjoy the wild Maine berries the way Himself does. I guess I like the ones with a bigger "body". Chubby, just like Himself!



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What makes the wild blueberries so great along the eastern part of the country is that it is the soil that is just the Allegheny Mountains ground down. They are older than the Rocky Mountains....
Addie, you have the wrong "A" mountain range. The Appalachian Mountains are the oldest. Actually, they're among the oldest range on earth. No wonder all those hikers want to tackle the AT!
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Old 09-03-2014, 09:48 PM   #18
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MC, if you can't find flavorful fresh ones, look for dried ones in your grocery store. They mix into scone batter nicely and plump up from the moisture in the batter. Just be sure to add a tablespoon or two extra of cream to allow for the plumping.

I love fresh blueberries when they have a good flavor. I just wash them up and pop them into my mouth like M&Ms! The cultivated ones. I've never been able to enjoy the wild Maine berries the way Himself does. I guess I like the ones with a bigger "body". Chubby, just like Himself!



Addie, you have the wrong "A" mountain range. The Appalachian Mountains are the oldest. Actually, they're among the oldest range on earth. No wonder all those hikers want to tackle the AT!
The Al ones are up here in the northeastern part of the country. It is an old Indian name for the Native American nation. The tribe that my grandfather belonged to was part of that nation. Along with most of the tribes here in MA. The White Mountains in NH are part of them also.
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Old 09-03-2014, 11:13 PM   #19
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addie, i don't think everyone knows your indian name "the last of the mohiccups"...
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Old 09-04-2014, 01:42 AM   #20
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They are always, without fail, a disappointment as they taste of absolutely nothing. I can only assume, having read about the American passion for them, that they don't travel well.
MC, I suspect you have fallen victim to BSBS: Boring Supermarket Berry Syndrome.

I find the same thing with most cultivated supermarket berries, including blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, and blackberries. Flavorless blah. Sometimes you can wake them up with a squeeze of lemon and a sprinkle of sugar, but they're not nearly as good as fresh berries you get from roadside stands or pick-your-own farms.

And the wild berries you sometimes stumble across in the woods... oh yes. Those are scrumdiddlyumptious. I don't know how many times I've run across a bramble while camping (usually while looking for a place to do one's business) and stood there for 20 minutes happily stuffing my face with berries.

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What makes the wild blueberries so great along the eastern part of the country is that it is the soil that is just the Allegheny Mountains ground down. They are older than the Rocky Mountains. It is all those minerals contained in the rocks that make the soil perfect.
Just between you and me, Addie, wild berries seem to do just fine out here in the "flatlands", too.
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