"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-12-2012, 12:40 PM   #11
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 116
For me it depends on what part(s) of the chicken I'm cooking. Bone-in skin-on usually goes at 400 degrees, unless a specific recipe states otherwise; boneless skinless usually goes at 350.

I always do whole birds in my rotisserie, so the time is more important than the temp. Birds always come out perfectly.
__________________

__________________
Bacardi1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2012, 01:37 PM   #12
Master Chef
 
Kayelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: south central coast/California
Posts: 9,879
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
In my mind chicken should be roasted, not baked. You bake cookies cakes and casseroles at lower temperatures but whole chickens or parts of chicken with the skin on must be roasted at higher temps to get good results. I never roast chicken at less than 400, and often 425 degrees. Your instant read digital thermometer is your friend until you become comfortable with cooking times.
In addition, Andy is absolutely right that dark meat should be cooked to 185 degrees. Roasted chicken thighs are my favorite so I want them cooked at high temp for a longer amount of time. The texture of the meat is greatly improved when they are actually over cooked.
__________________

__________________
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but rather by the moments that take our breath away.

Kayelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-2012, 09:45 PM   #13
Sous Chef
 
kitchengoddess8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 873
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle

In addition, Andy is absolutely right that dark meat should be cooked to 185 degrees. Roasted chicken thighs are my favorite so I want them cooked at high temp for a longer amount of time. The texture of the meat is greatly improved when they are actually over cooked.
Interesting to hear that dark meat tastes better when cooked at high temperatures. Maybe I should try cooking them at 400 for 45 minutes and see how that goes. I generally cook them in a foil lined 8 x 8 baking pan.
__________________
kitchengoddess8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-2012, 10:05 PM   #14
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
I think we have a difference of opinion here on just how well done dark meat should be.
__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-2012, 10:09 PM   #15
Sous Chef
 
kitchengoddess8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 873
Oh dear. Now I'm really confused!
__________________
kitchengoddess8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-2012, 10:21 PM   #16
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
If there were one correct answer you would find it in Wikipedia.

Instead, get a meat thermometer and try it for yourself, cooking your chicken to different degrees of doneness and then you decide how you like it.

Start out at an intermediate temperature. Then adjust up or down depending on your taste.
__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2012, 01:43 AM   #17
Master Chef
 
Kayelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: south central coast/California
Posts: 9,879
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchengoddess8 View Post
Oh dear. Now I'm really confused!
Don't be confused KG, you've already found out that an intermediate temp of 350 doesn't give you crispy skin like you wanted, nor did you like the texture. Try them at 400 degrees and cook them slightly longer. Then you'll know.
__________________
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but rather by the moments that take our breath away.

Kayelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2012, 08:37 AM   #18
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,362
A thin coating of oil on the skin helps to crisp it up.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2012, 10:13 AM   #19
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,856
This is my go-to recipe for baked/roasted chicken: Crispy Baked Chicken Leg Quarters. It works equally well with bone-in breasts. I use whatever seasoning mix I feel like - dried herbs or herb blends, garlic powder, onion powder, seasoned salt, etc.

It's the salt in the soy sauce that helps the skin dry and crisp and seasons the meat like a brine would. It doesn't taste like soy sauce, though. Really delicious. I also use the thermometer probe that came with my oven to let me know when it's done. It usually takes about an hour, rather than an hour and 15 minutes. YMMV.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2012, 10:51 AM   #20
Executive Chef
 
Harry Cobean's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Manchester UK
Posts: 2,913
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
A thin coating of oil on the skin helps to crisp it up.
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
This is my go-to recipe for baked/roasted chicken: Crispy Baked Chicken Leg Quarters. It works equally well with bone-in breasts. I use whatever seasoning mix I feel like - dried herbs or herb blends, garlic powder, onion powder, seasoned salt, etc.

It's the salt in the soy sauce that helps the skin dry and crisp and seasons the meat like a brine would. It doesn't taste like soy sauce, though. Really delicious. I also use the thermometer probe that came with my oven to let me know when it's done. It usually takes about an hour, rather than an hour and 15 minutes. YMMV.
here's a brilliant tip for seasoning chicken.marco pierre white uses it,it works & that guy was the youngest chef in the uk to get 3 michelin stars,so if it's good enough for mpw..........:
make a paste out of a knorr chicken stock cube & olive oil.rub over the skin & inside the cavity.crisp skin & delicious meat.do the same with beef,lamb,pork,fish & vegetables.just use the appropriate flavour cube.
__________________

__________________
I spent a lot of money on booze,birds & fast cars.The rest I just squandered.
Harry Cobean is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:51 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.