"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-14-2012, 11:09 AM   #21
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Cobean View Post
i think a good,accurate oven thermometer & the resting time for the meat are the most important factors here.whatever the dial says all ovens vary & it also depends on whether its fan assisted or convection.also depends on whether it's straight from the fridge or room temperature.i always allow meat to come up to room temp before cooking.
i roast whole chicken @ 440f(fan),20 mins/pound,rest for 15 mins/pound.skin is always browned & the meat moist.
but that's just me & my oven!

I use very high heat, too. 450.

Foolproof and delectable.

Kafka's Herb-Roasted Chicken | The Paupered Chef
__________________

__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2012, 06:47 PM   #22
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,393
Do not forget that the time will also depend on how close to each other pieces of chicken are. You can bake a chicken in a full size tray for an hour, you pack the same chicken and same temp into a small tray and it will come out uncook after the same time. Also it is important to proparly preheat your oven, that will too make a difference in baking time.
__________________

__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2012, 08:11 PM   #23
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
That's a good point Charlie. Things depend on more than temperature. I roast chicken pieces by covering a cookie sheet with aluminum foil, then place a small wire rack on top, and the chicken pieces on that. The wire rack allows juices to drain off instead of being absorbed by the chicken, but it also allows hot oven air to circulate underneath the chicken pieces, and prevents the pieces from being burned by sticking to the greasy pan. I cook whole chickens by a similar method (different rack, foil covered casserole dish.

I hope everybody on the forum knows to preheat their oven to a steady-state cooking temperature before inserting chicken. Use a independent oven temperature meter ($5 at most stores) to not only know when your oven has reached cooking temperature, but IMO they are more reliable than many oven thermostatic controls.

Some ovens have an indicator they have reached set temperature. Combined with accurate calibration this would be a good oven to have.
__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2012, 10:46 AM   #24
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 116
My oven "beeps" when it reaches the set temperature. In addition, I test it occasionally using an oven thermometer & it's always been 25 degrees hotter. I know it; husband knows it; so since we're the only ones who use it, we've just left it that way & simply adjust the temp accordingly.
__________________
Bacardi1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2012, 12:28 PM   #25
Head Chef
 
GLC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Near Austin, Texas
Posts: 1,216
In a conventional oven, there is no single oven temperature. The typical gas oven has the burner at the bottom. That creates a continuous variation in heat from bottom to top. You can visualize it as three zones, each different by 25F (14C or 1 "gas mark" in the UK), with the hottest at the bottom. If you then break up the pattern by inserting large barriers, like baking sheets, the distribution becomes more complex. Even the three zone view is simplistic and by no means reflects the actual temperature distribution in an empty oven.

Electric ovens may have more distributed heating elements and more complex heat distributions.

And the heat input is controlled according to the temperature at the oven's thermocouple, usually high on the back wall. If the vessels and sheets in the oven divert the flow of heat with regard to the thermocouple, the relationship between the heat at any point and the amount of heat delivered to the burner will change. It seems reasonable that the temperature in a working oven might vary 50F to 100F among oven positions. And of course we are always aware of the front to back difference.

If temperature was really so critical that 25F made a real difference, we would be in trouble. Fortunately that's not enough difference to be fatal. But if we're already wrong about the temperature at the food position by 25F-50F and we further change it by the way we load the oven, we could be very wrong, enough to make a difference. And maybe even the creator or tester of the recipe was wrongly believing in the oven temperature setting. If everything happens to be off in a combination of ways that all shift the actual temperature in the same direction, it would explain a perplexing failure in the recipe.

It's a good exercise for serious cooks to experiment with their ovens, checking the temperature top, bottom, and middle, front and back, and with baking sheets an large vessels in the oven.
__________________
"Kitchen duty is awarded only to those of manifest excellence..." - The Master, Dogen
GLC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2012, 12:43 PM   #26
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 1
Try roasting at a higher temp to sear the skin, then dropping your temp to finish cooking. This will lock in you juices and you end result will be better!
__________________
Gudtyms is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2012, 03:57 PM   #27
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
Quote:
Originally Posted by GLC View Post
In a conventional oven, there is no single oven temperature. The typical gas oven has ...
Indeed! And that's why there's convection ovens, which have fans to equalize the heat better. By minimizing hot spots and cold spots food can be cooked more evenly and it also saves energy because food with no cold spots cooks in a shorter amount of time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gudtyms View Post
Try roasting at a higher temp to sear the skin, then dropping your temp to finish cooking. This will lock in you juices and you end result will be better!
Another good idea. I do that all the time with roasts and turkeys, and I bet many others do too.
__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2012, 06:07 PM   #28
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,393
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gudtyms View Post
Try roasting at a higher temp to sear the skin, then dropping your temp to finish cooking. This will lock in you juices and you end result will be better!
Urban legend.
__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2012, 07:04 PM   #29
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
Roasting at a higher temperature affects how the chicken skin or roast "crust" turns out. Perhaps the sealing in the juices part is myth, I couldn't say.
__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2012, 08:26 PM   #30
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,341
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
Roasting at a higher temperature affects how the chicken skin or roast "crust" turns out. Perhaps the sealing in the juices part is myth, I couldn't say.
I think that's it.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:58 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.