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Old 05-16-2012, 01:01 AM   #41
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I've roasted chicken with and without the rack. The chicken fat is rendered and stays in the pan - it is not absorbed by the chicken. And it doesn't burn. So in my experience, the rack is just an extra item to clean and doesn't provide any benefit.
I'll use a cooling rack to set some chicken on, for my lazy set and forget meal. A large plastic baking bag set inside a larger aluminum pan, with potato slices and frozen green beans up front, formed aluminum dividers keep them seperate. I staple the bag shut. Not bad for set and forget.

What works best for me so far is to season and lightly fry the legs in in a cast iron skillet for 8 min or so, then put the skillet in the oven at 325F for about 40 minuntes. If I set the temp any higher, the meat splits apart and is done almost too fast.
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Old 05-16-2012, 02:54 AM   #42
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What is in Asian fish sauce?
it's a clear liquid about the same colour as very light soy sauce made by fermenting anchovies & salt for between 12 & 18 months.an absolute staple in thai & other asian cooking.used for seasoning.not the most appetising of smells but a fabulous deep,complex flavour.you know when you have a thai red curry & you get that deep,savoury almost meaty background taste that you can't quite pinpoint....that's fish sauce.i use it in none asian cooking as a seasoning too.
worcestershire sauce is made in a similar way but more spices,ingredients are added.might be worth trying that,but check the ingredients list first.
oh,by the way,i love watching the american cooking programmes,diners drive ins & dives,eat street etc(fabulous food most of the time) but everyone seems to have a problem pronouncing "worcestershire" over there.it's one of those weird(we're famous for 'em) english words that is pronounced differently to the way you spell it.it's "wooster or woostershire"sauce
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Old 05-16-2012, 03:03 AM   #43
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Thanks for the recipe. Unfortunately soy is a no-no for me health-wise, so I would need to find a substitute. Any ideas?
try umami paste(the fifth taste according to some):
Ingredients: tomato paste, garlic, anchovy paste, black olives, balsamic vinegar, dehydrated Porcini mushrooms, Parmesan cheese, citric acid, olive oil, wine vinegar, sugar, salt.
no msg,no soy...winner winner chicken dinner!
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Old 05-16-2012, 03:30 AM   #44
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Urban legend.
with you on that one charlie.if you must change temps then turn the heat up towards the end of the cooking time to finish,crisp & brown
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Old 05-16-2012, 06:55 AM   #45
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What is in Asian fish sauce?
Fish sauce is a condiment made from fermented fish used frequently in Asian cooking. It can be an ingredient in sauces, dressings or dips. It has a salty flavor that would make it a good substitute for soy sauce. The taste will be different, but in this recipe, it's really the salt and a mild flavor from brushing it on that you're after. Hope it works. Let us know if you try it.
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Old 05-16-2012, 07:44 AM   #46
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Originally Posted by Harry Cobean View Post
it's a clear liquid about the same colour as very light soy sauce made by fermenting anchovies & salt for between 12 & 18 months.an absolute staple in thai & other asian cooking.used for seasoning.not the most appetising of smells but a fabulous deep,complex flavour.you know when you have a thai red curry & you get that deep,savoury almost meaty background taste that you can't quite pinpoint....that's fish sauce.i use it in none asian cooking as a seasoning too.
worcestershire sauce is made in a similar way but more spices,ingredients are added.might be worth trying that,but check the ingredients list first.
oh,by the way,i love watching the american cooking programmes,diners drive ins & dives,eat street etc(fabulous food most of the time) but everyone seems to have a problem pronouncing "worcestershire" over there.it's one of those weird(we're famous for 'em) english words that is pronounced differently to the way you spell it.it's "wooster or woostershire"sauce

I just call it "what's this here sauce?"
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Old 05-16-2012, 08:40 AM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Cobean View Post
try umami paste(the fifth taste according to some):
Ingredients: tomato paste, garlic, anchovy paste, black olives, balsamic vinegar, dehydrated Porcini mushrooms, Parmesan cheese, citric acid, olive oil, wine vinegar, sugar, salt.
no msg,no soy...winner winner chicken dinner!
Can you buy that somewhere or do you have to make it yourself? I'm not supposed to eat soy in any form - it's too estrogenic.
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Old 05-16-2012, 08:43 AM   #48
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Originally Posted by Harry Cobean View Post
...
oh,by the way,i love watching the american cooking programmes,diners drive ins & dives,eat street etc(fabulous food most of the time) but everyone seems to have a problem pronouncing "worcestershire" over there.it's one of those weird(we're famous for 'em) english words that is pronounced differently to the way you spell it.it's "wooster or woostershire"sauce
I pronounce it "wister" or "wisteh sher" if someone looks at me funny/puzzled for "wister".
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Old 05-16-2012, 09:10 AM   #49
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it's a clear liquid about the same colour as very light soy sauce made by fermenting anchovies & salt for between 12 & 18 months.
And in using it, you'll be following one of the oldest culinary traditions on Earth. Garum, also sometimes called liquamen, was a very popular condiment among ancient Romans who got it, like most things "Roman," from the Greeks. Made by fermenting fish or fish innards. The problem with all Middle Ages and older recipes is that they didn't give quantities, but the impression is that garum was heavily used, Production was so heavy that we know a lot about the problems caused by the stink. And just like Asian fish sauces, not everyone like it. But the ones who did used it heavily. And like Asian fish sauce, there were differences in quality and regional variations.

We don't know a lot of the details. At one point garum and liquamen appear to refer to different kinds of fish sauce and later came to mean the same thing. We have to assume that, like the Asian sauces, the best were light amber color. The dregs went to the poor to flavor their miserable meals. But it was THE sauce and sauce base of the day. It seems to have hung around into the medieval period and then faded, perhaps as spices began to be feasible for someone below the aristocracy. And then they went as nutty about spices as the Romans had been about garum. You can still buy a Mediterranean product something like it.
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Old 05-16-2012, 12:10 PM   #50
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What is in Asian fish sauce?
fish
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