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Old 07-06-2012, 08:29 AM   #61
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If the meat is dry, you are cooking it too long. Pull the chicken when the juices run clear, and let rest for ten minutes or so before serving.

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Old 07-06-2012, 08:38 AM   #62
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
If the meat is dry, you are cooking it too long. Pull the chicken when the juices run clear, and let rest for ten minutes or so before serving.

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Old 07-06-2012, 10:47 AM   #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North
If the meat is dry, you are cooking it too long. Pull the chicken when the juices run clear, and let rest for ten minutes or so before serving.

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Thanks! I baked it at 400 for 40 minutes. Do you think I should go higher than 400 and shorten the time?
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Old 07-06-2012, 10:50 AM   #64
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Thanks! I baked it at 400 for 40 minutes. Do you think I should go higher than 400 and shorten the time?
You have to cook it less. So same temp, less time. Try 30 minutes @ 400F.
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Old 07-06-2012, 10:54 AM   #65
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Originally Posted by Andy M.

You have to cook it less. So same temp, less time. Try 30 minutes @ 400F.
Ok I'll try that and post the results.
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Old 07-06-2012, 11:23 AM   #66
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You really should get an instant read thermometer so you can by temp rather than time.
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Old 07-06-2012, 11:47 AM   #67
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You really should get an instant read thermometer so you can by temp rather than time.
I've never used one. What do I need to do?
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Old 07-06-2012, 11:54 AM   #68
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I've never used one. What do I need to do?
You can find digital (not a dial type) instant read thermometers in kitchen stores or places like Target or Wal-Mart, etc.

Taylor and Polder are reliable brands. You can find them for as little as $10.

All you have to do is turn it on and stick the tip of the probe into the thickest part of the meat and let the temperature register. You sill see the numbers climbing on the display. When it stops, that's the temp of the meat. Test a couple of different parts of the meat to be sure. All chicken is cooked safely at 161F. I find thigh meat has a better texture around 180F-185F. Breast meat will be dry and tough at thigh temps so stick to the low to mid 160s.
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Old 07-08-2012, 08:58 PM   #69
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.

You can find digital (not a dial type) instant read thermometers in kitchen stores or places like Target or Wal-Mart, etc.

Taylor and Polder are reliable brands. You can find them for as little as $10.

All you have to do is turn it on and stick the tip of the probe into the thickest part of the meat and let the temperature register. You sill see the numbers climbing on the display. When it stops, that's the temp of the meat. Test a couple of different parts of the meat to be sure. All chicken is cooked safely at 161F. I find thigh meat has a better texture around 180F-185F. Breast meat will be dry and tough at thigh temps so stick to the low to mid 160s.
So do you take the meat out to rest as soon as it reaches the ideal temperature?
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Old 07-08-2012, 09:03 PM   #70
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So do you take the meat out to rest as soon as it reaches the ideal temperature?
Yes. Any additional cooking will merely result in more "overshoot" of your desired temperature.

Experienced chefs often take their roasts out of the oven short of the ultimate target temperature in anticipation of this overshoot. It is often an experience that must be learned. After taking your roast chicken (beef, pork) out of the oven, monitor the ultimate peak temperature and relate that to what it was when you took it out, and relate that to how you like it cooked. Take good notes and adjust your procedure accordingly.
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