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Old 07-09-2012, 11:07 PM   #81
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Thanks for clarifying! How often do you usually check the temperature with the first type of thermometer you described.
You usually have a rough idea of how long something has to cook so you check as you get lose to that time. If you're close, within 10º, check again in a few minutes. It doesn't take long.

If you are really not sure how long something will take, you'll have to check earlier and more frequently. That's part of the learning process. Make notes for next time.
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Old 07-10-2012, 08:11 AM   #82
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Good news. Raising the oven temperature and coating the chicken thighs with olive oil seems to be working but sometimes the meat is a bit dry. Any suggestions on how to get the meat a bit more tender?
I have to go along with Chief Longwind here.

"Roasting/baking at high temperatures, 425 - 450'F. results in crisper skin. A meat thermometer is used to determine when the deepest part of the meat reaches 155'F. Let the chicken rest for 10 to 15 mintues and it will come to a final temp of 165'F, which results in tender, juicy meat. The chicken cooks fast at high temperature, so start checking it after 30 minutes or so."

I find it really important to get the chicken out at 150 - 155F and let it rest in order to get it up to 165F. This redistributes the juices gently without cooking them away.
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Old 07-10-2012, 07:02 PM   #83
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Thanks everyone for these wonderful tips on using a meat thermometer. I'm going to get one and try it.
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Old 07-10-2012, 07:19 PM   #84
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Thanks everyone for these wonderful tips on using a meat thermometer. I'm going to get one and try it.
Now you're talking. And you can get an inexpensive one for about $10. Later you can splurge for a more expensive one.
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Old 07-10-2012, 08:18 PM   #85
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Does the kind of pan you use affect the temperature of the chicken? I've been using an 8 x 8 cake pan lined with foil.
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Old 07-10-2012, 08:40 PM   #86
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Does the kind of pan you use affect the temperature of the chicken? I've been using an 8 x 8 cake pan lined with foil.
No. Cake pans, cookie sheets, brownie pans, cast iron skillets no difference.
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Old 07-11-2012, 12:47 AM   #87
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No. Cake pans, cookie sheets, brownie pans, cast iron skillets no difference.
Actually, I tried roasting a chicken in a 4" deep, metal, lasagna pan and it just wasn't getting cooked. I moved the chicken to a shallower, glass, roasting pan.
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Old 07-11-2012, 10:45 AM   #88
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Actually, I tried roasting a chicken in a 4" deep, metal, lasagna pan and it just wasn't getting cooked. I moved the chicken to a shallower, glass, roasting pan.
A high-sided pan such as a lasagne pan will interfere with the cooking process, usually by slowing the browning of the exterior. That's why I suggested low-sided pans.
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Old 07-11-2012, 10:57 AM   #89
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A high-sided pan such as a lasagne pan will interfere with the cooking process, usually by slowing the browning of the exterior. That's why I suggested low-sided pans.
Tis true. High sided pans both negate the natural circulation of air in an oven, which keeps new hot air from transferring its heat to the skin. It also blocks infra-red heat from reaching the skin, again blocking that all important heat transfer that makes the skin crisp and delicious. So now you know why roasting pans are shallow. And if you can put you meat, be it foul, fish, or meat onto a rack of some sort, it will cook even better.

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Old 07-11-2012, 11:02 AM   #90
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I always use a rack when I put a large piece of meat in the oven. Makes a big difference. When I make a fresh pork shoulder and put it on the rack, it is crispy all around. Soo good!!
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