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Old 04-11-2013, 03:29 AM   #1
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The great ham gravy versus red eye gravy debate

I decided to make us some ham and sourdough biscuits for a belated Easter meal when I thought "gee, wouldn't gravy be nice too". So I searched the web for a really good gravy that would go with ham and biscuits. The recipes seemed to fall into two types of ham gravy: regular old ham gravy and red eye gravy. It's amazing how passionate people are about their gravy on their ham. Do you have a preference and why?

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Old 04-11-2013, 03:46 AM   #2
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I was raised with regular old milk based ham gravy.

I prefer a gravy with some thickening.

The red eye gravy that I am familiar with is coffee used to deglaze the frying pan the ham was cooked in. That just isn't gravy to me.

Try cutting up some leftover boiled potatoes and heat them in the regular old ham gravy. We called them creamed potatoes, sometimes we tossed in a handful of frozen peas.

Good stuff!
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Old 04-11-2013, 03:53 AM   #3
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See Aunt Bee, that's how I feel milk and fat and flour or cornstarch is more gravy like to me. And I rarely do coffee except with chocolate.
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Old 04-11-2013, 03:56 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fairygirl69 View Post
See Aunt Bee, that's how I feel milk and fat and flour or cornstarch is more gravy like to me. And I rarely do coffee except with chocolate.
I think it was just a case of using what was available.

My family were farmers and always had basics like milk, eggs etc.

If you were in a north woods lumber camp or on a cattle drive in Texas all you had was some leftover coffee to slosh in the pan.

I am glad I landed where I did!
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Old 04-11-2013, 04:01 AM   #5
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Does it count if I think both are gross?
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Old 04-11-2013, 04:47 AM   #6
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Sure it counts!
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Old 04-11-2013, 04:48 AM   #7
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Sure it does!
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Old 04-11-2013, 05:40 AM   #8
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If we are talking about good ol' fashioned country smoked ham, I prefer the red eye gravy. 'Course, I ain't got anything against any type of gravy.
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Old 04-11-2013, 05:58 AM   #9
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This is probably more to do with regional preferences.

Sausage gravy is more commonly served with biscuits than anything else here.

By the same token, if the menu is ham steak, egg, and grits then red-eye gravy is expected.

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Old 04-11-2013, 09:24 AM   #10
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I've never heard of serving gravy with ham. Since ham doesn't really generate it's own juices or fond and is usually accompanied with some kind of glaze, plus it technically only needs warmed through, no one I know has ever made gravy from it... or to serve with it. If there is a potato served with it it is usually scalloped, au gratin or similar. Nothing that would require gravy.
Unless you mean fresh ham. Up here "ham" always refers to smoked ham.
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