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Old 05-13-2006, 03:34 AM   #1
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The Pancake Experience

I love to flip pancakes when I make them so I share my Pancake experience with you so you can flip and make flap jacks too.
Take a BOX OF YOUR favorate PAN CAKE MIX. You can get it with Blueberries, Buttermilk so you don't need to add Milk, or Eggs because they are in the mix. Whey is a form of milk. Remember little Miss Muffet eating her Curds amd Whey. I like a Belgian pancake mix and use it alot. Oh yes that's right according to the Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy ~ Life, The Universe and Everything the word Belgium is obsean. Then why do they HAVE Belgium waffle and pancake mix in the grocery store?

DO YOU MAKE PAN CAKES WITHOUT A MIX?

HOOPY @ CHOCOLATE PANCAKES
MAKE 2 CUPS OF HOT CHOCOLATE WITH 6 TBS. OF COCOA POWDER depending on how strong you like it. I like it real strong for cooking. After pouring boiling water over Cocoa stirr it up but don't get it mad. LET IT SET AND COOL DOWN AWHILE.
INTO A PLASTIC CONTAINER WITH COVER like Butter comes in to keep the extra mix in frig. or BOWL trying not to get too boweled over with the idea of Chocolate Pan Cakes POUR 2 CUPS OF PANCAKE MIX. SLOWLY POUR ABOUT 1 1/2 CUPS COLD COCOA MADE WITH 6 TABS. COCOA POWDER OVER THE MIX STIRRING CLOCKWISE UNTIL IT IS SLIGHTLY THICKISH AND SLOWLY DROPS OFF A SPOON. You do not want it too liquidy. I do this by sight of texture. If it is too thin add more Pancake Mix. Drink what Cocoa is left over. LET MIX SET A FEW MINUTES to become one with itself.
PUT 2 TABLESPOONS OF CANOLA OIL IN FRYING PAN SPREADING OVER THE BOTTOM. DROP A TAD OF MIX INTO OIL AND WAIT TILL IT SIZZLES ~ THEN THE OIL IS HOT ENOUGH TO USE. USING SPOON TO GUIDE IT SLOWLY POUR THICKISH PANCAKE BATTER OVER AND INTO FRYING PAN. If it runs when poured into the pan it is too thin and the Pancake can fall apart when you try to flip it. KEEP OIL HANDY AND ADD BIT MORE IF PAN STARTS TO GET DRY. NOT SO MUCH IT WOULD SPLASH WHEN YOU FLIP BUT SO SLIDES ON IT.
THE PANCAKE SHOULD BE ABOUT 6 INCHES OR SIZE OF YOUR PALM. I Dont mean the kind they give away in Church Palm Sunday and I make crosses out of. I mean the bottom of your hand. WHICHEVER IS BIGGER AND NOT TOO THIN FOR EASY FLIPPING leastways until you are real good flipping Flap Jacks or Pancakes
FOR VALENTINES DAY PANCAKES ~ IMMEDIATELLY AFTE
R POURING THE BATTER INTO THE PAN MAKING A 5 TO 6 INCH PANCAKE USE THE BACK OF A SPOON TO STRETCH 3 CORNERS OF THE PANCAKE A LITTLE AND SHAPE IT TO LOOK LIKE A HEART. IF USING REGULAR OR SOY MILK INSTEAD OF COCOA YOU MIGHT TRY ADDING RED FOOD COLORING TO THE BATTER BEFORE MAKING THEM FOR RED HEART SHAPED PANCAKES. I DO NOT HAVE ANY AT PRESENT SO CAN'T TELL HOW OR IF IT WORKS :^{(
AN EGG CAN BE ADDED BUT YOU MUST ADOPT THE BATTER SO YOU HAVE PROPER CONSISTENCY. THE MIX I USE HAS EGGS IN IT SO I DON'T USE ONE. I wonder if I can use A CADBERRY CHOCOLATE EGG. If I do I will add it to the Liquid Cocoa before adding like Chocolate Chips for Chocolate Chip Pan Cakes first, then add the Pan Cake Mix.

MAKING THE PANCAKE OR FLAP JACK

I love to flip the flap jacks so I use a medium frying pan with upward curved edges to make flipping easier. Cast Iron ones are too heavy for me. No short handles should be used.
PUT a layer about 2 TABLESPOONS OF OIL IN THE FRYING PAN. PUT A TAD BIT OF The PANCAKE BATTER MIX IN OIL AND WAIT TILL IT SIZZLES. THEN THE OIL IS READY. SLOWLY POUR WITH A SPOON PAN CAKE BATTER INTO THE FRYING PAN. SHOULD BE THICK ENOUGH TO DROP OFF THE SPOON SLOWLY. WHEN THE EDGE BUBBLES AND LOOKS FIRM try sliding it in the pan. If it slides try flipping it. I lift edges with turner to check color or you can do that when flipping them.

HOW TO FLIP THE PANCAKE OR FLIPPING THE FLAP JACK ~
First slide the pancake back and forth in the layer of oil on the pan. Then start moving the pan in a clockwise circle above the stove. Balance Pan Handle in your Palm with your thumb on the handl above the bend in the first finger on underside of it.and hand and end of handle in your palm so that the wrist can move the pan. Moving the pan clockwise over the stove watch how the pancake slides in the pan. Give it a test run lifting the pan up quickly to see if the Pancake wants to leave the comfort of the pan. When it does it is ready to flip. Move the pan in a clockwise motion abit watching the pan cake slide in the pan. When it slides around easy and is near the center then quickly jerk your wrist upward and somewhat toward you lifting the pan upward and flipping the flap jack ~ I mean pancake. We used to call them Flap Jacks when I grew up. Anyone know why?
Now that you have flipped it the fun really begins. Move it arround on the pan abit more watching the movement and then quickly flip it again. Not too high though. You don't want to catch it on the ceiling. Continue to watch and flip them. Get a rhythem going. You can now tell/see the color on both sides and decide which side needs to be cooked longer. Continue flipping until the oil in the pan is too low and it may burn. I usually burn the first one a little on one side if I let the oil get too low in the pan before starting. You do not however want so much oil the pancake will splash it when it lands. That can cause GREASE BURNS. I use finely chewed Plantain leaves spit on the burn or if real bad Bag Balm from the fparm store.
I continue flipping the flap jack until most of oil is gone. I like to then try to flip it into the air and try to catch it on a plate. It involves catching in plate with left hand while flipping it with the right. Do it over a clean stove, counter or cookie sheet in case you miss catching it.
TEST WITH TOOTHPICK to see if cener is done if in doubt. If Toothpick comes out dry it is O.K. I try to put it in at an angal so does not look like a hole and can be covered easily with fixins like Butter (Put some on before reheating pancakes in a microwave as it pulls moisture out of foods. I keep a small cup or glass full of water in a corner of the microwave for this reason).
You can also put on the Pan Cakes ~ Maple Syrup, Jam Preserves ~ I like Apple Butter, or Chocolate Gravey. I am not putting you on. If I make a stack I put some on each one or you can put it on all of them.
Now the question is how do you cut the pancakes? Fork, Knife and Fork, Spoonor maybe Chop Sticks. Do you do it a bite at a time, Criss cross with knife and fork or just a fork til all are cut, one guy I knew cut from the center out or do you eat them rolled up or another way?

@ NOTE~ Hoopy according to The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy means ~ altogether complete as in amazingly hoopy.

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Old 05-13-2006, 12:09 PM   #2
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I have a friend who makes pancakes frequently, and he has some interesting ideas. He tends to put in them whatever he has on hand. Sometimes they're sweet, and sometimes savory. I asked him to write a few of them down for me...here you go:

Bern's pancakes and toppings:
1. Blini: buckwheat flour, white high gluten or bread flour, egg, yeast, milk [Russian]
Make a thin batter, make small pancakes, top with sour cream or yogurt and smoked fish [salmon, trout, mackerel, etc] or caviar [domestic or imported] Also good with lemon curd.
2.Regular pancakes: I prefer Three grain pancake mix from Nora Mills, Grist Mill, Nora Mills Georgia. I add sour milk, egg, canola oil, blendor chopped green onion and corn kernels to make a medium batter, make dollar pancakes on griddle, Serve with good sausage, bacon, or ham, real maple syrup [dark better than light and less expensive], or low sugar jam [black currant, strawberry, lemon curd, citrus marmalade, or whatever strikes your fancy]
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Old 05-13-2006, 12:17 PM   #3
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Sherman. set the wayback machine to September 1967, and the location to Hiawatha National forrest, in the old BoyScout Camp off of Highway 48.

Now watch closely and be quiet. We are watching scout troop 86, a group of about 20 boys, led by a wonderfully creative scoutmaster. The various squadrons, each containg 6 boys, are competing against each other in a timed flap jack flipping contest. They have to make the batter, heat the pan over a cooking fire, and race to a wooden pole, lashed between two trees, aproximately 15 feet in the air, and flip thier flapjack up and over the poll, catching it in the pan. And if they miss, they have to brush the dirt off, and finish cooking it. Cooks must eat thier own pancakes.

And yes, I am a self-procalaimed pancake master.

Yup, those were good times.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 05-13-2006, 12:36 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Constance
I have a friend who makes pancakes frequently, and he has some interesting ideas. He tends to put in them whatever he has on hand. Sometimes they're sweet, and sometimes savory. I asked him to write a few of them down for me...here you go:

Bern's pancakes and toppings:
1. Blini: buckwheat flour, white high gluten or bread flour, egg, yeast, milk [Russian]
Make a thin batter, make small pancakes, top with sour cream or yogurt and smoked fish [salmon, trout, mackerel, etc] or caviar [domestic or imported] Also good with lemon curd.
2.Regular pancakes: I prefer Three grain pancake mix from Nora Mills, Grist Mill, Nora Mills Georgia. I add sour milk, egg, canola oil, blendor chopped green onion and corn kernels to make a medium batter, make dollar pancakes on griddle, Serve with good sausage, bacon, or ham, real maple syrup [dark better than light and less expensive], or low sugar jam [black currant, strawberry, lemon curd, citrus marmalade, or whatever strikes your fancy]
Constance, I'm hurt. You mean you don't use my recipe for your pancakes? Everyone I've ever given it to gushes about it. And, How's the novel comming? Have you had any time to work on it.

By the way, just kidding about the pancake recipe. Use any that you like. I sometimes use my basic recipe, but substitute whole grain wheat flour for the AP flour, and apple sauce for the milk. They come out great.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 05-13-2006, 01:06 PM   #5
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Aw, don't get your feelers hurt, Weed. I use Bisquick for my pancakes, when I make them. Since the boy has left home, I find I'm doing a different kind of cooking.
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Old 05-13-2006, 08:09 PM   #6
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I'll be waiting....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North
Constance, I'm hurt. You mean you don't use my recipe for your pancakes? Everyone I've ever given it to gushes about it. And, How's the novel comming? Have you had any time to work on it.

By the way, just kidding about the pancake recipe. Use any that you like. I sometimes use my basic recipe, but substitute whole grain wheat flour for the AP flour, and apple sauce for the milk. They come out great.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
Please post it again, Goodweed. I would like to compare it to my dozen or so that I make. Hurry, I want a batch tomorrow morning.
Thanks, Phil
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Old 05-13-2006, 08:40 PM   #7
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Ok phil. Give 'em a try. And once you try them, go ahead and alter the recipe to your heart's content. Enjoy.

World’s Best Pancakes

These pancakes are so light, fluffy, and moist, they leterally melt in your mouth. The flavor is classic, slightly sweet, but with a ballanced flavor between all ingredients. Once you have tried this recipe, you will never again use a box mix.

Another great thing about this recipe is that you can mix a large batch of the dry ingredients in advance, then place them into an airtight container and scoop out what you need for however many people you are going to serve.

To go a step further, I one time mixed in enough powdered milk to make 1 cup per cup of flour used, and enough powdered egg to make 1 egg per cup fo flour. Then, when I went camping, I just added water and the pancakes were as good as when made from all fresh ingredients.

You will have fun changing this recipe by adding things like M & M’s or peanuts, or bits of banana. I’ve added maple extract, or used maple syrup in place of sugar. I’ve add vanilla and nutmeg. You can really get creative, as long as all of the basic ingredients, both wet and dry, are there. Enjoy.

The key to these pancakes is proper technique. Follow this recipe and you will be known as the pancake king or queen of your household.

Dry Ingredients:
1 cup all-purpose flour
2 tbs. Sugar or sweetener of choice (I use Splenda)
½ tsp. salt
1 tbs. Double-acting baking powder (Calumet or Clabber Girl brand)

Wet Ingredients”
¾ cup milk
3 tbs. Cooking oil
1 large egg.

Preheat an elctric griddle, or suitable non-stick, or cast-ion pan. For an electric griddle, heat to 370 degrees. For the other two pans, heat until water dances on the surface.

Combine all dry ingredients into a large, stainless steel, glass, or plastic bowl with a wire whisk. Add the wet ingredients and stir until blended in. But do not overmix as this will toughen the pancakes. Leave small lumps in the batter. They will disappear as the pancakes cook.

Spoon the three to four tbs. of batter onto the cooking surface. If I catch you squishing the cooking pancakes with a spatula, I’ll come over and whap your hands. Once they are cooking, leave them alone! Turn when bubble appear on the surface, but before they remain open. Cook for about forty more seconds. Remove and serve immediately.

This batter also works well for waffles. If you thin it with more liquid, and add an extra egg, you have a wonderful crepe batter. If you substitute conrstarch for ½ of the flour, you have a very good tempura batter.

As I said above, play with the recipe after learning to make the original. Make it yours. And feel free to share it with others, so long as they know where it originated. It is copyright protected by law. And I don’t charge for this, my signature recipe.

Enjoy.

From the kitchen of Bob Flowers

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 05-13-2006, 10:04 PM   #8
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Thanks, Goodweed....

You're gooder'n airy angel. What I've done over the years is use buttermilk. You have to use baking soda with any buttermilk recipe. Try this with any pancake recipe, Bisquick included. Beat the white of an egg until stiff and fold into the batter just before you spoon 'em in the "black iron skillet". I like my pancakes thin, so I add a little more milk. I stack about a dozen. It is only about an inch and a half high. I also like to use blackberry jam and fix em like an enchalada. Course I use a ton of butter. Nuthin' like a soppin' buttered pancake. Maple syrup is hard to beat, also. Come on Sunday mornin'.
Night all.
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Old 05-14-2006, 11:54 AM   #9
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Hmmm got some to try out here, DH tries to make it homemade now and then but usually I come away with the strong taste of flour...
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