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Old 12-23-2013, 02:41 PM   #1
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Thermometers Untrustworthy

I have four meat thermometers. And electronic, a "leave in" and two instant reads. I've calibrated them all using boiling water.

I put them deep in the thigh meat or the breast meat (turkey or chicken), but have had instances of the thermometers reading 180 degrees, yet there still being some red, undercooked meat.

Am I simply placing the thermometers in the wrong places?

Thanks,

Al

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Old 12-23-2013, 03:17 PM   #2
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Poultry meat is not red. If the thermometer has been calibrated and the temp is 180, the red color you are seeing is more likely marrow that has leached out from the bone. This typically occurs in young birds, but it can occur with older birds as well. It is perfectly harmless if the the temp is good.
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Old 12-23-2013, 04:05 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoot View Post
Poultry meat is not red. If the thermometer has been calibrated and the temp is 180, the red color you are seeing is more likely marrow that has leached out from the bone. This typically occurs in young birds, but it can occur with older birds as well. It is perfectly harmless if the the temp is good.
+1

Go by the temp, not the color. Poultry is safe @ 165F so anything above that is not an issue. Also, take the temp in the breast.
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Old 12-27-2013, 06:24 AM   #4
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Agree with the above! If the temperature is correct them it is safe to eat. Just make sure you measure at the thickest part of the meat, usually the breast and from both sides, in case your oven is not uniformly hot.
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Old 12-30-2013, 01:39 PM   #5
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I think I haven't been getting the thermometer deep enough. I worry that I will hit bone or poke into the cavity.

If it is touching bone, does that make the temp too high or too low?
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Old 12-30-2013, 03:01 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PianoAl View Post
I think I haven't been getting the thermometer deep enough. I worry that I will hit bone or poke into the cavity.

If it is touching bone, does that make the temp too high or too low?
I have similar concerns and that is why I no longer use the probe that stays in the meat while it cooks.
With an instant read thermometer, I check several places to be certain.

Oh....Guessing on the question. I say "higher" if the probe is touching the bone. Meat will be cooler.
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Old 12-30-2013, 03:15 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PianoAl View Post
I think I haven't been getting the thermometer deep enough. I worry that I will hit bone or poke into the cavity.

If it is touching bone, does that make the temp too high or too low?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
I have similar concerns and that is why I no longer use the probe that stays in the meat while it cooks.
With an instant read thermometer, I check several places to be certain.

Oh....Guessing on the question. I say "higher" if the probe is touching the bone. Meat will be cooler.

When I did our rib roast for Christmas, I used a remote probe thermometer and checked at intervals during the cooking with an instant read.

Bones heat faster than meat. For this reason and others, always check temps in several locations to determine doneness. When cooking chicken and turkey, the temperature in the coolest part of the chicken has to be at least 161F regardless of the temps in other parts of the bird.
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Old 12-30-2013, 05:17 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
I have similar concerns and that is why I no longer use the probe that stays in the meat while it cooks.
With an instant read thermometer, I check several places to be certain.

Oh....Guessing on the question. I say "higher" if the probe is touching the bone. Meat will be cooler.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
When I did our rib roast for Christmas, I used a remote probe thermometer and checked at intervals during the cooking with an instant read.

Bones heat faster than meat. For this reason and others, always check temps in several locations to determine doneness. When cooking chicken and turkey, the temperature in the coolest part of the chicken has to be at least 161F regardless of the temps in other parts of the bird.
While I understand wanting to make sure it's cooked to desired doneness, poking a thermometer all over in several places is the same as using a fork to drain the juices from the meat. jmo
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Old 12-30-2013, 05:20 PM   #9
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While I understand wanting to make sure it's cooked to desired doneness, poking a thermometer all over in several places is the same as using a fork to drain the juices from the meat. jmo

I'm talking three or so holes. It didn't lose much juice at all.
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Old 12-30-2013, 09:24 PM   #10
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We all know that by the time we get a perfect 161 degree reading on chicken or turkey breast, the optimum 180 degree for the dark meat is a long time coming.

My friend had the perfect solution for her Christmas turkey this year. When the breast reached 161, she removed both sides of the breast and tented them to rest, returning the rest of the bird to the oven to reach 180. Has anyone else done this?
I think it's so simple it's down right brilliant!
I will defiantly will be doing this next time.
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