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Old 08-05-2018, 01:39 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Rocklobster View Post
Tomato on the bottom? Blasphemy!
Yes, tomato on the bottom and genoa salami under the cheese.
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Old 08-05-2018, 04:37 PM   #22
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KC, have you tried a Keller's Speciecial *1 at the old Car Hop on Loop 12? there may still be the old original place in Keller Springs. Really nice micro thin big burger. They make a version of it here in Austin at Hut's Hamburgers, but it is Way to big.


Eric, Austin Tx.
I haven't heard of The Car Hop. I'll have to check it out.

CD
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Old 08-05-2018, 07:52 PM   #23
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Between thick and thin, I prefer the thin side. I want to be able to get a bite out of a nicely charred grilled burger without the fillings squishing out of the side.

My bread of choice for burgers is onion buns, toasted on the grill with the patties. My fave is an Ortega burger...grilled patty, lettuce, tomato, whole Ortega green chiles, and a slice of Monterey Jack. I like a leaf of lettuce on the bottom of the burger and on the top to help keep the bun from getting soggy.

Now I SO want a burger.
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Old 08-07-2018, 10:52 AM   #24
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I like hamburgers. That's about it.






I like 'em thick, and I like 'em not as thick, but I want enough meat so it's the star of the show and will shine through the condiments. If the patty is too thin, then I want a double. I want a patty that's as big as the bun, regardless of the thickness. Toasted onion or wheat bun (my preferred brand here is Orowheat). Sear the burger hot so the edges have a bit of a crunch. I never buy preformed patties. When having burgers at home I always make my own by hand.

Start with the bottom half of the toasted bun. Ketchup and mustard, then a slice of raw onion. Next is the meat, cheese (usually American, nicely melted), lettuce, tomato, mayo, and top half of bun. I can and do change it up, but this is my favorite, classic burger.

I first had one made up like this in the mid 1950's when I was a kid in White Bear Lake, MN. There was a restaurant in town called The Malt Shoppe, and in Minnesota back then, that burger was called a California hamburger (I guess that was the first place that built one with that stack of condiments). That burger along with a chocolate malt for dinner on Friday evening before the weekly grocery shopping is one of my fondest childhood memories. The restaurant is gone, and I haven't seen "California hamburger" on a menu for nearly 60 years, yet I still miss it.

I have had, and liked, many variations on the lowly hamburger. One of my favorite lunch stops when I'm in Denver is to hit a Red Robin. They have a lot of different offerings that I like, except I usually sub onion rings for their steak fries. Their Whiskey River BBQ burger that comes topped with fried onion straws is quite tasty.

There is another Denver area brew pub called CB & Potts that has a really good variety of burgers. Most brew pubs tend to have decent burgers, but some also have good fish 'n chips, so it's often a dilemma deciding which to have.
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Old 08-07-2018, 11:54 PM   #25
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I vote for thinner burgers. The bun, toppings, and meat need to balance out. I cannot get that balance with a thicker burger.

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Old 08-08-2018, 04:44 AM   #26
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Two problems for me. I am not a bread eater. I just don't like the texture of it. So I always opt for a rare burger on the thin side. I use the bread as a means to hold it all together.

My second problem is serving me a large helping of any food. I immediately feel overwhelmed and can never decide where I should start. Pirate one day when he was in the Dollar Store, he spotted a child's plate and matching soup bowl. Perfect size for me. If I manage to eat that first helping, then I can always ask for a small second one.

Fried onions, one thin slice of tomato, and if the bun is well toasted, I most likely will eat that also. Just one more thing though. After all the cooking has been completed for it, I want both sides of the bun smeared with lots of mayo or butter.
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Old 08-08-2018, 05:10 AM   #27
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So I always opt for a rare burger on the thin side. I use the bread as a means to hold it all together.
Eating rare ground beef is dangerous. USDA guidelines call for a minimum internal temperature of 160 F for ground beef. Are you looking for e coli sickness?
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Old 08-08-2018, 05:50 AM   #28
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Eating rare ground beef is dangerous. USDA guidelines call for a minimum internal temperature of 160 F for ground beef. Are you looking for e coli sickness?
My father and oldest brother used to eat raw ground beef (purchased from the grocery store) sandwiches with a thick slice of raw onion, salt and pepper. That isn't what killed them. The USDA also requires that prosciutto imported from Italy or Iberico ham imported from Spain, go through a longer curing process than what those countries have been doing for hundreds of years. Just sayin.
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Old 08-08-2018, 10:40 AM   #29
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My father and oldest brother used to eat raw ground beef (purchased from the grocery store) sandwiches with a thick slice of raw onion, salt and pepper. That isn't what killed them. The USDA also requires that prosciutto imported from Italy or Iberico ham imported from Spain, go through a longer curing process than what those countries have been doing for hundreds of years. Just sayin.
People drive without wearing seat belts, ride motorcycles without wearing helmets, and eat at Chipotles. Most don't suffer any negative consequences. I guess you have to decide what risks you are willing to take.
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Old 08-08-2018, 11:42 AM   #30
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Eating rare ground beef is dangerous. USDA guidelines call for a minimum internal temperature of 160 F for ground beef. Are you looking for e coli sickness?
Especially for elderly people whose immune systems are often compromised.
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