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View Poll Results: Do you break your spaghetti/linguine prior to cooking?
Yes, almost always or always 27 35.06%
No, never or barely ever 41 53.25%
Less than 50% of the time 6 7.79%
More than 50% of the time 3 3.90%
Voters: 77. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-29-2013, 10:43 PM   #171
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Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
If you are at home without an audience and if your partner doesn't mind you can eat your spaghetti and meat balls with your fingers if you like. If you're in a restaurant it's unlikely you'll have a knife for the pasta course but in any case (on my side of the pond, at least) so it's considered perfectly good manners to cut your meat ball with your fork. In Italian restaurants over here, in my experience, the waiter often takes away the knife and leaves you a spoon and fork if you choose pasta.

Am I right in thinking that in America you cut up your food and then transfer fork to right hand and scoop? (Source=Old black and white film where the American secret agent in France was given away because the Gestapo saw him do this) whereas we cut as we go so have knife in right hand and fork in left with points pointing down throughout the meal. Would a Brit in America be considered uncouth for doing it like this?

Aren't good manners and perceptions thereof odd.
You are obsessed with knives. Here in America they set the table and then they leave it the freak alone. No taking back stuff.
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Old 09-29-2013, 10:45 PM   #172
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Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
We were always served the meat and pasta courses separately during our meals in Italy. The exception seemed to be seafood pasta and pasta that had pancetta or guanciale in them.

Most Sunday Gravy is served with the sauce and pasta as a separate course from the meats cooked in the gravy. The sausages, meatballs and braciole and/or pork were removed from the gravy and served.
I think it's better to serve them separately unless the pasta is a side.
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Old 09-29-2013, 10:49 PM   #173
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..., as a little girl I learned to twirl spag with a spoon and fork at an early age then when I'd mastered that I graduated to using just a fork against the curve of the dishor plate, which is what I do now. Is it "correct"? No idea but it works.
Spoon and fork seems to be the internationally accepted standard.
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Old 09-29-2013, 10:53 PM   #174
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Originally Posted by bakechef View Post
Yes some do eat this way. I was taught the continental style, fork in left hand tines pointing downward and the knife in the right, cutting the food as you go. Once you start doing it this way it makes a lot of sense, no switching back and fourth and the utensils feel more like an extension of your hands.

My husband cuts up all of his food at once when we are at home but in a restaurant he eats continental style, I only noticed this recently.
That's all wrong. With pasta the spoon goes in the left hand and fork in right.
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Old 09-29-2013, 10:56 PM   #175
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
No mayo, even if you're right, the decision to break pasta for a wide variety of reasons is not the end of the world. Not suggesting you should do it. Others prefer it that way and that's OK.
I go with this. It's the chef's prerogative. In the end the chef is responsible for how the meal turns out.
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Old 09-29-2013, 11:00 PM   #176
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Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
In our case, a household with no natural teeth left, breaking the spaghetti is a new learned behavior. Pasta is also now cooked past al dente. It's true, as you age and certain things befall you, you regress back to childhood.
How do you cook it al dente if you ain't got no dente?
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Old 09-29-2013, 11:11 PM   #177
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Originally Posted by Greg Who Cooks View Post
Spoon and fork seems to be the internationally accepted standard.
Actually, I never use a spoon. All you really need is a fork and the edge of the plate.
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Old 09-29-2013, 11:17 PM   #178
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Originally Posted by Greg Who Cooks View Post

That's all wrong. With pasta the spoon goes in the left hand and fork in right.
This was referring to dining in general, not eating spaghetti, a question that was a little of topic.
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Old 09-30-2013, 07:28 AM   #179
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Originally Posted by 1006gm View Post
Who breaks their spaghetti/linguine prior to cooking it. My husband and I bicker about this all the time. He likes me to break it and cook it so it's not messy and so he doesn't have to cut it. I don't like to break it. Any reasons as to why I should or shouldn't break it? What do you do with your pasta? Thanks!
My boyfriend is the same as your husband, he'd also like me to break it. I always eat spaghetti with a fork and a spoon and it would be much more difficult to eat broken spaghetti in my opinion. Then you might as well buy some other shape of pasta from the beginning.
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Old 09-30-2013, 09:10 AM   #180
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Up until I saw this on TV, I too left my spaghetti long. I didn't realise how dangerous it is. Someone could loose an eye.

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