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View Poll Results: Do you break your spaghetti/linguine prior to cooking?
Yes, almost always or always 27 35.06%
No, never or barely ever 41 53.25%
Less than 50% of the time 6 7.79%
More than 50% of the time 3 3.90%
Voters: 77. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-01-2012, 11:36 PM   #61
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That's great. Relax and enjoy. The spaghetti police won't bother you.
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Old 05-01-2012, 11:57 PM   #62
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Like I said before, sometimes you need to make accommodations for age and ability to chew. The very young and the elderly (some of us not so elderly) need special treatment in order to survive a meal. And others because Mama always did.
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Old 05-02-2012, 10:11 AM   #63
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hey, elbows? hadn't thought of using my elbows in eating spaghetti before--might be better even than the spoon.... :)
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Old 05-02-2012, 11:53 AM   #64
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I never break long pasta, I'm a simple 100% Italian pasta eater. I mean, they make them spaghetti long, I eat them long, they make them penne short, I eat them short. Though I'll admit it could be more difficult to lengthen short pasta then to shorten long pasta.
And I always asked for my spoon when eating pasta, but I did it just to look fanciful. Now I don't do it anymore.
However, according to the (disputable) rules of etiquette, long pasta must be eaten only with the fork: you shall not cut it with a knife and you'll not use a spoon. You have to gently rotate the fork clockwise () to collect a reasonable amount of pasta, then carry it to your mouth: no spaghetti long thread must hang from the fork.
However, in my career, I ate spaghetti with my bare hands, with forks, spoons, knives, breadsticks and only with my mouth (the latest option is really horrible, but we were drunken and everyone wanted to win that bet).
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Old 05-02-2012, 01:46 PM   #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luca Lazzari View Post
I never break long pasta, I'm a simple 100% Italian pasta eater. I mean, they make them spaghetti long, I eat them long, they make them penne short, I eat them short. Though I'll admit it could be more difficult to lengthen short pasta then to shorten long pasta.
And I always asked for my spoon when eating pasta, but I did it just to look fanciful. Now I don't do it anymore.
However, according to the (disputable) rules of etiquette, long pasta must be eaten only with the fork: you shall not cut it with a knife and you'll not use a spoon. You have to gently rotate the fork clockwise () to collect a reasonable amount of pasta, then carry it to your mouth: no spaghetti long thread must hang from the fork.
However, in my career, I ate spaghetti with my bare hands, with forks, spoons, knives, breadsticks and only with my mouth (the latest option is really horrible, but we were drunken and everyone wanted to win that bet).
Excellent recitation.
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Old 05-02-2012, 01:46 PM   #66
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Buonasera Luca,


I have never seen someone slicing up ribbon pasta in Italy ... I have seen this in Spain, and it is Mind Boggling to me ... However, the Spanish are not Italians !

And they overcook Pasta horribly ...

The exception:

In Madrid, There are only 2 Sardinian Trattorias worth eating at in the whole country; Scatto Matto and Café Poetti.

My twin grandsons are 5 yrs old and they twirl their own pasta around the fork !

Perhaps, for the elderly ... and then, there is short pasta ! or lasagne or canellones !

Kind regards.
Margi.
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Old 05-02-2012, 01:56 PM   #67
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I used to put unbroken pasta (Lady & the Tramp style lol), standing up in boiling water around the edges of the pot; but found that the pasta sometimes stuck together - even when I used a large enough pot to accomodate same.

Unbroken pasta (spaghetti, etc.) looks nicer on the plate, but my concern is that the pasta is cooked al dente (not over or undercooked)... so I break it in half, & no twirling with a spoon.
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Old 05-02-2012, 02:45 PM   #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerise View Post
I used to put unbroken pasta (Lady & the Tramp style lol), standing up in boiling water around the edges of the pot; but found that the pasta sometimes stuck together - even when I used a large enough pot to accomodate same.

Unbroken pasta (spaghetti, etc.) looks nicer on the plate, but my concern is that the pasta is cooked al dente (not over or undercooked)... so I break it in half, & no twirling with a spoon.

The difference is not becuase of the pasta length. It's because the unbroken pasta wasn't stirred regularly during the cooking process.

I cook unbroken spaghetti in a 3.5 quart saucier unbroken and it never sticks because I stir it several times during cooking.
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Old 05-02-2012, 03:03 PM   #69
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I am with you on that Andy. You can't put pasta in the pot and then walk away. You have to keep stirring it until it is all under water. Then return several times during the cooking time. You pasta should be dancing in the boiling water. If you can sing a nice polka, your pasta should be dancing in step with your singing. (Well it works for me!)
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Old 05-02-2012, 03:25 PM   #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
I am with you on that Andy. You can't put pasta in the pot and then walk away. You have to keep stirring it until it is all under water. Then return several times during the cooking time. You pasta should be dancing in the boiling water. If you can sing a nice polka, your pasta should be dancing in step with your singing. (Well it works for me!)

You're making me nervous, Addie. First you invite wild bears into your home then you sing polkas to pasta.
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