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Old 04-20-2014, 12:15 PM   #1
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Thoughts on the work triangle idea

Do you have a work triangle in your kitchen? Do you think it makes a difference? Right now, I am an apartment dweller for the first time since the early 80's and my kitchen is a challenge. It's a good thing that I have been cooking for years under different conditions because the set up ain't worth crap. No room, all in one line, apartment sized oven, no ventilation hood.

Got this from Wiki, anybody care to add anything??



The kitchen work triangle principle is used by kitchen designers and architects when designing residential kitchens:[2][3]
  • No leg of the triangle should be less than 4 feet (1.2 m) or more than 9 feet (2.7 m).
  • The sum of all three sides of the triangle should be between 13 feet (4.0 m) and 26 feet (7.9 m).
  • Cabinets or other obstacles should not intersect any leg of the triangle by more than 12 inches (30 cm).
  • If possible, there should be no major traffic flow through the triangle.
  • A full-height obstacle, such as a tall cabinet, should not come between any two points of the triangle.
Besides the work triangle itself, there are several rules of thumb to consider when planning a kitchen:[2][3]
  • As measured between countertops and cabinets or appliances, work aisles should be no less than 42 inches (110 cm) for one cook, or 48 inches (120 cm) for multiple cooks.
  • A sink should have a clear counter area of at least 24 inches (61 cm) on one side, and at least 18 inches (46 cm) on the other side.
  • A refrigerator should have a clear counter area of at least 15 inches (38 cm) on the handle side; or the same on either side of a side-by-side refrigerator; or the same area on a counter no more than 48 inches (120 cm) across from the refrigerator.
  • A stove or cooktop should have a clear 15 inches (38 cm) area on one side, and at least 12 inches (30 cm) on the other side.
  • At least 36 inches (91 cm) of food preparation area should be located next to the sink.
  • In a seating area where no traffic passes behind the diner, allow 32 inches (81 cm) from the wall to the edge of the table or counter; if traffic passes behind the diner, allow 44 inches (110 cm) inches.

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Old 04-20-2014, 01:01 PM   #2
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My kitchen breaks all of those rules. IF I was to build a kitchen for myself I would have a work triangle. I find it saves time and trouble. And nothing stored over my head.
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Old 04-20-2014, 01:53 PM   #3
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I have a galley kitchen. Fridge and microwave next to the stove . Across from the stove is the sink. It is wide enough that I can reach both sides just by turning around and maybe taking one step. I do have overhead storage cabinets that are empty. I did have stuff stored over the stove with the ventilation hood. But little by little I have given the stuff away to my kids. So those two cabinets are empty. I do wish I had pull out shelves in the bottom cabinets. I have two very large counter tops on either side of my sink. One side I use to put clean dishes as I wash them. And I keep my large and small FP's on that side. On the other side I have my coffee maker , electric can opener and Kitchen Aid Mixer. I also keep my sugar and coffee canister on that side. Across from that side I have a small counter spot with a cabinet underneath. I keep my too canister with my wooden spoons and spatulas in, along with a salt and pepper shaker for the stove. I am not thrilled with the kitchen, but it works for me. I have plenty of drawers. No complaint there. In spite of all the items on my counter tops, I do have plenty of room to work. I can roll out a pie crust if need be.

Spike put up some removable shelves right on the wall next to the small cabinet. I keep odd and end foods that I use every day. Seasonings, small flour canister for making gravy, etc. He also tiled the back of the stove and sink for me so it is much easier to clean instead of the painted wall. I have one of the larger kitchens in this building.
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Old 04-20-2014, 02:11 PM   #4
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I have enjoyed studying kitchen design for decades and I believe this is an ideal to strive for when designing a kitchen that works for you. The best book I have read on this subject is Sam Clark's "The Motion Minded Kitchen, Step by Step procedures for designing and building the kitchen you want with the space and money you have"

The Motion-Minded Kitchen: Sam Clark: 9780395349304: Amazon.com: Books

I also read "Cheaper by the Dozen" when I was quite young and those principles have stuck with and influenced me through out my life.

I have loved working in my new kitchen, which is based on these principles.
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Old 04-20-2014, 02:27 PM   #5
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my "triangle" is:
sink - prep/work area - cooktop

including the fridge or the oven in a triangle methinks is the harebrain idea of someone who has not yet heard of the theory: 'get your stuff out & ready'

if the stove is below the "cooktop" unit, no problem.

but when I'm fixing to fix something, I drag out all the ingredients into the prep area. I'm not opening the fridge twenty times....

when I put something in the oven, it's going in "for good" - the oven is not something I need to access within half an arm's reach on a minute by minute basis.

basically, I reckon I have some disagreements with the experts-of-no-experience when it comes to zactly what should be in a triangle.....
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Old 04-20-2014, 02:30 PM   #6
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Just love your kitchen Beth! That large sweep of prep area beside the fridge is wonderful.
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Old 04-20-2014, 03:17 PM   #7
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That's a great kitchen, Beth---- wish I had it.

At least I have "The double-file kitchen (or two-way galley) has two rows of cabinets at opposite walls, one containing the stove and the sink, the other the refrigerator. This is the classical work kitchen."

And there's just one way in.

But my needs are different now that when I had no health problems and all the cabinets at the top are unused/empty. (No use storing other things in them, like blankets, for I'd never chance climbing on a step stool to get to them.)The cabinets below my knees are rarely used or used with great discomfort/pain.

I'm not really complaining---- I like my apartment and it does have more cabinets etc than the typical, same price range apartment does. I do wish it had an oven at waist height---- but again I'm not complaining.
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Old 04-20-2014, 03:47 PM   #8
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Oh Beth, your newly completed kitchen is a stunner, and you deserve it!

We do have a "triangle kitchen" although not as beautiful, it works well for me and my souse chef. Steve likes to say we have a two a-- kitchen. lol

I once had a galley kitchen and it drove me nuts.
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Old 04-20-2014, 03:56 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocklobster View Post
Do you have a work triangle in your kitchen? Do you think it makes a difference? Right now, I am an apartment dweller for the first time since the early 80's and my kitchen is a challenge. It's a good thing that I have been cooking for years under different conditions because the set up ain't worth crap. No room, all in one line, apartment sized oven, no ventilation hood.

Got this from Wiki, anybody care to add anything??



The kitchen work triangle principle is used by kitchen designers and architects when designing residential kitchens:[2][3]
  • No leg of the triangle should be less than 4 feet (1.2 m) or more than 9 feet (2.7 m).
  • The sum of all three sides of the triangle should be between 13 feet (4.0 m) and 26 feet (7.9 m).
  • Cabinets or other obstacles should not intersect any leg of the triangle by more than 12 inches (30 cm).
  • If possible, there should be no major traffic flow through the triangle.
  • A full-height obstacle, such as a tall cabinet, should not come between any two points of the triangle.
Besides the work triangle itself, there are several rules of thumb to consider when planning a kitchen:[2][3]
  • As measured between countertops and cabinets or appliances, work aisles should be no less than 42 inches (110 cm) for one cook, or 48 inches (120 cm) for multiple cooks.
  • A sink should have a clear counter area of at least 24 inches (61 cm) on one side, and at least 18 inches (46 cm) on the other side.
  • A refrigerator should have a clear counter area of at least 15 inches (38 cm) on the handle side; or the same on either side of a side-by-side refrigerator; or the same area on a counter no more than 48 inches (120 cm) across from the refrigerator.
  • A stove or cooktop should have a clear 15 inches (38 cm) area on one side, and at least 12 inches (30 cm) on the other side.
  • At least 36 inches (91 cm) of food preparation area should be located next to the sink.
  • In a seating area where no traffic passes behind the diner, allow 32 inches (81 cm) from the wall to the edge of the table or counter; if traffic passes behind the diner, allow 44 inches (110 cm) inches.
My current kitchen is a galley. It has the triangle but the room's tiny - about 7 feet x 10 feet with a lot of unusable wall space and nowhere to put a table and chairs unless valuable cupboard space is sacrificed. I have a chair in there for sitting down between tasks but it's a nuisance and I have to move it to get into the cupboard.

My previous house was smaller than this one but the kitchen was the biggest room in the house - 15 feet x 15 feet - I didn't care about the triangle. A big extending table in the middle and a mixture of built-in cupboards and free standing furniture including my great grandmother's walnut chiffoniere and an arrangement called a "press" - drawers in the bottom 1/3 and a huge 3 shelf double cupboard on top for china, baking equipment, storing jams and chutneys, etc. I miss it.
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Old 04-20-2014, 04:05 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dcSaute View Post
my "triangle" is:
sink - prep/work area - cooktop

including the fridge or the oven in a triangle methinks is the harebrain idea of someone who has not yet heard of the theory: 'get your stuff out & ready'

if the stove is below the "cooktop" unit, no problem.

but when I'm fixing to fix something, I drag out all the ingredients into the prep area. I'm not opening the fridge twenty times....

when I put something in the oven, it's going in "for good" - the oven is not something I need to access within half an arm's reach on a minute by minute basis.

basically, I reckon I have some disagreements with the experts-of-no-experience when it comes to zactly what should be in a triangle.....
With you on all of that. The problem is that most houses and therefore kitchens are designed by men who don't have much experience of working in one.
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