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Old 08-20-2012, 03:59 PM   #291
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Well, I don't buy bread or EGGS, but I categorize everything based on where it will go in the house, not what it is. I don't buy veggies, obviously, because of the garden, but fruit all goes in one bag--it all goes in the hanging basket (I hate fruit that has been kept in the fridge). Onions or garlic could go in that bag because those things also go in the hanging basket.

Meat in another. Anything frozen, another. Any cleaning products, another. In the car, they all sit side-by-side, nothing gets put on top of another bag.
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Old 08-21-2012, 07:00 AM   #292
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I just let the baggers do their job while I keep an eye on the register. Sometimes if the cashier doesn't push the item far enough down the shute, she picks it up again and rings it in twice. Experienced cashiers don't do that. They push them down to the bagger. It is always the new ones. And since I don't handle any of the bags, I let my son worry about all that. He does scatter the real heavy items throughout the items. All baggers love to put all the heavy stuff in one bag.
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Old 10-09-2012, 06:10 AM   #293
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If you have ever sliced a bunch of cherry tomatoes, this trick might interest you. I saw this cool way to slice cherry tomatoes on a show today:

Life Made Easy: Cherry Tomato Slicing - Steven and Chris - CBC Player

If you can't view the segment, basically you take two lids (from yogurt, margarine, etc.) that are the same size. Place the one lid on a flat surface with the rimside up (upside down). Fill it with cherry tomatoes that are similar in size. Take the second lid, and place it right side up on top of the tomatoes. Gently hold the top lid in place, slice horizontally through the tomatoes. Wish I had known this trick during cherry tomato season. Next year.
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Old 10-09-2012, 06:27 AM   #294
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
If you have ever sliced a bunch of cherry tomatoes, this trick might interest you. I saw this cool way to slice cherry tomatoes on a show today:

Life Made Easy: Cherry Tomato Slicing - Steven and Chris - CBC Player

If you can't view the segment, basically you take two lids (from yogurt, margarine, etc.) that are the same size. Place the one lid on a flat surface with the rimside up (upside down). Fill it with cherry tomatoes that are similar in size. Take the second lid, and place it right side up on top of the tomatoes. Gently hold the top lid in place, slice horizontally through the tomatoes. Wish I had known this trick during cherry tomato season. Next year.
That sound like it would be great for grapes, olives and other pesky items that tend to move around and take some time to process.

Good tip!
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Old 10-09-2012, 07:33 AM   #295
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That sound like it would be great for grapes, olives and other pesky items that tend to move around and take some time to process.

Good tip!
Definitely--olives I tend to slice using my egg slicer, but if you wanted to cut them in half, it would definitely help. And, I think most of us have extra lids floating around...
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Old 10-09-2012, 07:43 AM   #296
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I have to carry bags quite a distance ... when I have to park on the street, it is 22 steps up. From the alley/garage, it is less -- but, still, a dozen steps down on a gamey leg. So what I tend to do is make sure the perishables are in the same bags, and I bring them into the house and take care of them. The rest waits until I regain my wind or my husband goes out (usually both). Some things I simply leave in the garage until we need them. That's something I didn't used to do, just since I hurt my leg. I'm thinking maybe of buying a shelving unit and just not bringing some non-perishables into the kitchen until I need them.
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Old 10-09-2012, 09:01 AM   #297
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I have to carry bags quite a distance ... when I have to park on the street, it is 22 steps up. From the alley/garage, it is less -- but, still, a dozen steps down on a gamey leg. So what I tend to do is make sure the perishables are in the same bags, and I bring them into the house and take care of them. The rest waits until I regain my wind or my husband goes out (usually both). Some things I simply leave in the garage until we need them. That's something I didn't used to do, just since I hurt my leg. I'm thinking maybe of buying a shelving unit and just not bringing some non-perishables into the kitchen until I need them.
I had a co-worker years ago that used the trunk of her car as a pantry because she had a large number of steps to her apartment.

Any time someone stopped by she would press them into service to carry several items up the stairs!

Whatever works!
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Old 10-09-2012, 10:20 AM   #298
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Moderation: Removed quote from Spammer in which Aunt Bea gave very good advice below for a faulty oven, Thanks, Aunt Bea! PF


All your oven can do is get hot.

I would pick up an oven thermometer and check to see if the temperature is accurate, then just compensate by adjusting the temperature dial.

Does your recipe give good results to others that use it?
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Old 10-09-2012, 04:45 PM   #299
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Good bread comes from using the proper flour for kind of bread to be made, and the right ballance of sugar, salt, and flour for flavor, the correct amount of yeast, to leaven the dough, and the proper temperatures for raising the dough, and baking the bread. The amount of moisture in the oven is also important to create the type of crust you want. A more dry cooking environment gives a more delicate, tender crust. More moisture thickens the crust.

As long as the oven temperature is correct, the oven will not affect the bread quality. In fact, moving air, as in a convection oven, will cause the bread to bake much more quickly.

I believe that bread loft comes from to processes, how much gas is produced by the yeast, and then trapped by the gluten, and the expansion of the gas caused by heat, before the structure is set by that same heat. So, too cool an oven won't set the bread structure (raw dough), while too much heat will cause the crust to form too quickly, not allowing the bread to rise completely.

Too much oil will remove some of the elasticity of the bread, making it heavy, though moist and tasty. Too little oil makes the bread very dry in texture.

Water softens, and is absorbed into the flour starches, and into the protein (gluten), where it creates a rubbery mass that will trap and hold the CO2 created as the yeast organisms eat and digest sugars and starches from the dough. Also, if the yeast is strong enough (wild yeast), then it also gives off sufficient acid to give you sour dough.

Think about all of these things as you make your dough. Start with a proven recipe, and make sure your oven temperature is correct. Follow the technique instructions. Your bread will come out fine. From there, you can start experimenting with your bread. Some of those experiments will come out good, some great, and some will be disasters. But you will learn something from every batch you bake. And that's what it's all about.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 12-09-2012, 09:33 AM   #300
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To remove excess fat from soups, stews or sauces, drop in 3 or 4 ice cubes. The fat will congeal around them as they melt. You can then remove the fat and reheat if necessary to re-thicken.
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