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Old 08-17-2014, 04:46 PM   #491
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Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
I heat water using an individual burner on the deck. That way, I keep the heat out of the house. The DH has a stove outside in one of the outbuildings. It is the canning stove and where we roast turkey or other things in the summer to keep the heat out of the house. I also do my tomatoes out on the deck when I'm using my tomato strainer. Makes cleanup a lot easier--I just take the hose and spray down the area. Back in the olden days, many a home had a summer kitchen where canning was done. The first farm house we rented had one, it was great for canning. Our farm has an enclosed back porch, not quite a canning kitchen, but we've done a lot of cooking out there. My dad has one of those propane corn/crab pots and that is used for heating water in the summer for canning projects.
We had one on the farm also. It had a wood burning stove with windows on both sides that opened out and up and you put a stick there to hold it open. When canning wasn't happening, we sometimes would play in there. Of course our job was to fetch the wood that was already cut up. It was not attached to the house in case of fire.
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Old 08-17-2014, 04:53 PM   #492
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Here in the middle of the desert, your trash could get mightily rank.
When I have garbage that can't go down the disposal
(bones, wrapping from the meats, etc.),
I put it into a plastic grocery sacks
(sometimes I forget to take my reusable bags)
tie it up good and tight
and put in the deep freezer chest until trash day.
We are very fortunate here regarding trash. Each floor has a trash room with five very large lined garbage cans. On the first floor is the largest trash room as it also contains the different containers for recycling. Most of the residents here do recycle. But it can be difficult at times for me to go down there on my scooter, get the door open and haul any stuff into the room. The only thing I do recycle are plastic soda bottles. I give them to my neighbor since she cashes them in for Christmas money for her grandchildren. Every morning at six a.m. the maintenance department collects all the trash from the three floors and takes it all to the very large dumpster. Even on Sundays. About two years ago we had a mouse problem. So Sunday collection was added. End of problem.
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Old 08-17-2014, 05:01 PM   #493
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Originally Posted by Kaneohegirlinaz View Post
Here in the middle of the desert, your trash could get mightily rank.
When I have garbage that can't go down the disposal
(bones, wrapping from the meats, etc.),
I put it into a plastic grocery sacks
(sometimes I forget to take my reusable bags)
tie it up good and tight
and put in the deep freezer chest until trash day.
From one desert dweller to another, I do the same thing! Been doing that for decades.
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Old 08-17-2014, 06:07 PM   #494
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From one desert dweller to another, I do the same thing! Been doing that for decades.
I do that with bones after I make soup...and I'm not a desert dweller. We only have garbage pickup every other week. I compost most of my organic stuff, but not the bones because of the dogs and don't participate in the green bin program because I compost (green bin holds chicken feed). I don't want the vet bill that accompanies a dog eating turkey bones and having one pierce the intestines.
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Old 08-18-2014, 07:00 AM   #495
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Question

Re: bones when making soup....mentioned in the post directly above this one - I have heard different methods. There is the 'browning' of bones in the oven method first (presumably gives a stronger flavour) but I tend to just simmer them as they are.

Anyone tried both methods? If so, how do they compare?
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Old 08-18-2014, 07:53 AM   #496
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Yes, browned bones, whether by frying, or roasting, have more flavor. With poultry bones, it is important to crack the bones, as this allows the marrow, collagen, and minerals to be released into the broth, making it both healthier, tastier, and better feeling in the mouth feel. Also, adding chopped celery while simmering the bones helps to extract nutrients and minerals, as it raises the acidity of the broth just a little bit. The celery also adds flavor. It can be removed when the broth is complete. After the broth is made, strain it, pick the bones of any remaining meat and add it back into the broth. Add the other ingredients for your soup.

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Old 08-18-2014, 02:45 PM   #497
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... The celery also adds flavor. It can be removed when the broth is complete. After the broth is made, strain it, pick the bones of any remaining meat and add it back into the broth. Add the other ingredients for your soup.
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I save the bits, roots, peelings, basically the pasts of veggies like carrots, onions, celery and parsley stems, in the freezer in ziptop bags.
When ever I make broth/stock or even poaching something, I add in those leftover veggies that might have not been used otherwise.
This imparts extra flavor.
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Old 08-19-2014, 12:37 PM   #498
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I was taught by a chef to roast bones first (and crack the bones). I was also told to add a bit of vinegar when roasting the bones to extract the calcium. Not sure if it is true or not. The threads on how to make stock cover this topic. Making stock for soup is a two-stage process in my world. If I do make broth, I use one of those mesh bags for washing delicates to hold the bones...makes removing them from the broth much easier.
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Old 08-25-2014, 11:07 AM   #499
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Just to clarify, a flavorful, nutritious liquid made by simmering meat, poultry or fish with aromatics and vegetables, or aromatics and vegetables only, is broth; when you add bones, it's stock.
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Old 08-25-2014, 11:08 AM   #500
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24 Essential Kitchen Tricks and Tips from Serious Eats. Lots of great ideas here, and in the comments.
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