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Old 08-13-2015, 11:37 AM   #551
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I donít know the science behind thisÖmaybe some sort of electrolysis, but it works better than anything else I have tried.
Electrolysis? Where would the electric current come from?

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrolysis
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Old 08-13-2015, 01:03 PM   #552
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An electrolytic reaction is actually possible if foil, in contact with a different metal is in the presence of an acidic food. e.g. a stainless bowl of tomato sauce covered in foil. The dissimilar metals and the acidic food together create an electrolytic reaction. Food Safety Education | For Consumers | FAQ

I realize that's not the case with the OP's situation.
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Old 08-13-2015, 01:17 PM   #553
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Interesting, thanks, Andy.
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Old 08-13-2015, 02:31 PM   #554
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Iím dropping a post here to help remind me to come back and read all 51 pages of this thread.

First tip that popped in my mind is celery storage (forgive me if someone hit this alreadyÖI have yet to read this whole thing like I said).

I donít remember where we got this tip, but for years now we have been storing our celery in aluminum foil. Thatís right, no paper towels, just a full and complete wrap of aluminum foil.

Shortly after bringing home a bunch of celery #1(a bunch as in the units they grow in) they come out of the plastic bag, no washing, and right in to the foil. I have celery now that stays salvageable for a good month. Granted, after that month itís better for cooking than raw but it takes weeks and weeks to get spoilage. If you see some when you go in there for a couple stalks, just cut it away like mold on cheese.

I donít know the science behind thisÖmaybe some sort of electrolysis, but it works better than anything else I have tried.
#1 is called the "Stalk" of celery. Break off (#2) one piece and that becomes a "Rib."
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Old 08-13-2015, 02:34 PM   #555
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#1 is called the "Stalk" of celery. Break off (#2) one piece and that becomes a "Rib."
No, the entire thing is a bunch. A single piece is a stalk or a rib.
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Old 08-13-2015, 02:37 PM   #556
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Btw, I keep celery in a Tupperware celery container. I've had it since around the time I got married 32 years ago. Celery keeps for at least a month in it.
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Old 08-13-2015, 02:56 PM   #557
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Btw, I keep celery in a Tupperware celery container. I've had it since around the time I got married 32 years ago. Celery keeps for at least a month in it.
I knew that so well. I still have a plastic spatula that I won as a door prize. What woman of our generation didn't attend a Tupperware party.
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Old 08-13-2015, 03:42 PM   #558
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Since celery is being discussed, I did share my successful storage tip on them about a year ago on this thread. Here it is again...

Celery keeps longer if the brown base is lightly sliced off (a fraction) and the celery head placed in a strong/wide jar with some water in its base (about 1 -2 inches), covering the top of them with their wrapper.
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Old 08-13-2015, 04:11 PM   #559
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Longer than what?
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Old 08-13-2015, 06:56 PM   #560
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I buy the old dark green, stringy, "mature" celery with mud on it, because I prefer the celery flavor and it keeps for a month or six weeks in the crisper without any special handling. The younger pale green celery often goes bad in a couple of weeks.

I have always liked the Victorian idea of keeping it on the counter at room temperature in a celery vase and changing the water every few days.
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