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Old 08-14-2015, 02:22 PM   #571
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I knew that so well. I still have a plastic spatula that I won as a door prize. What woman of our generation didn't attend a Tupperware party.
Well, you're a generation ahead of me, Addie I don't remember how I got the Tupperware containers I have. My mom may have bought me a set. I have covered plastic bowls and some other stuff, too.
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Old 08-14-2015, 03:06 PM   #572
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The last Tupperware party I went to was in the early 80's and it was a couples event held in a saloon.

I used to have one of these and I miss it. I used it mainly for storing ripe olives.

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Old 08-14-2015, 03:22 PM   #573
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Geez Aunt Bea, how many olives do you go through?

I remember that pickle keeper. My Mom had one. Danged thing took up more room in the fridge than the jar they came in! It did come in handy, though, when we got down to the last bit of Dad's batch of dill pickles. An old, washed jar would have accomplished the same thing.
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Old 08-14-2015, 04:56 PM   #574
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Mine would go bad, limp, just yucky. It's made of almost entirely of water, so I guess it just dried out? I'm having great luck with the paper towel/aluminum foil.
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Old 08-14-2015, 04:58 PM   #575
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
So, now I am curious. In what way does the celery stay fresher? I usually just shove it in the fridge in the open, plastic bag with holes that it came in. It is still usable a month or more later. The leaves start to turn yellow and get dry, and so may the tops. The occasional stalk gets hollow. If it gets limp, I cut off the bottom and put the stalks in a glass of water. That almost always rejuvenates it.
I am sure each method posted here has its merits, i.e. there is more than one way of keeping celery fresher for longer.

The benefit of the method in my post (given again here), is that the celery continues to extend its living life (since it is taking up water from its curtailed root base still). Also, being stored out in daylight (not in the fridge) the leaves do not turn yellow but become green again!

Here is my original post:-

.... the brown base is lightly sliced off (a fraction) and the celery head placed in a strong/wide jar with some water in its base (about 1 -2 inches), covering the top of them with their wrapper.

If the celery is not used up reasonably quickly, it may become necessary to, again, thinly take a slice off the root base (if it starts to go slightly brown), like you would with the stems of cut flowers to improve their ability to take up water.
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Old 08-14-2015, 08:35 PM   #576
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I buy the old dark green, stringy, "mature" celery with mud on it, because I prefer the celery flavor and it keeps for a month or six weeks in the crisper without any special handling. The younger pale green celery often goes bad in a couple of weeks.

I have always liked the Victorian idea of keeping it on the counter at room temperature in a celery vase and changing the water every few days.
That's pretty, AB. I have a light purple pressed glass celery vase in my antiques curio cabinet. It was my grandmother's, maybe even her mother's, I figure it's close to 100 years old. They stopped using manganese in glassware around 1920 or so, that and the sun is what made glass turn purple.

From my earliest memories, she always had glassware sitting out in the sun. :-)

I also store celery in alum foil, it does work great!
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Old 08-14-2015, 11:24 PM   #577
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If the base is trimmed, just sightly, and the stalks are cut off, the base can be put into dirt, in a pot, and new stalks will grow. Just saying.

Oh, and Newberry Michigan, i the U.P., used to be the celery capitol of the U.S. And you thought we just made cars.

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Old 08-16-2015, 03:43 PM   #578
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For the bakers using an electric oven -- when washing up, I lay things like whisks, mixer beaters, cheese graters, etc. (all metal) on that burner where the oven vents heat. Gets them good and dry all by themselves in places a towel can't reach. It also prevents my leaving a pan sitting there blocking the vent. I don't know if gas ovens have a vent like that.
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Old 08-16-2015, 05:25 PM   #579
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For the bakers using an electric oven -- when washing up, I lay things like whisks, mixer beaters, cheese graters, etc. (all metal) on that burner where the oven vents heat. Gets them good and dry all by themselves in places a towel can't reach. It also prevents my leaving a pan sitting there blocking the vent. I don't know if gas ovens have a vent like that.
In the winter we have forced hot air heat. I keep a large pan of water on that burner to put moisture in the air. Because it is a back burner, I rarely use it. Being so dang short, I find it difficult to reach and see into the pot. When I have the oven on, really put moisture in the air.
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Old 08-24-2015, 04:42 PM   #580
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I started buying real imported Parmigiano Reggiano cheese several years ago because I like the taste better than the canned version. It keeps for several weeks tightly wrapped in the fridge, but if you have a problem with it going bad before you can use it all, you have two options:

1. You can cut it into smaller pieces and freeze them practically forever.

2. Since it's an aged cheese, it's not porous, so you can cut off any surface mold and use the rest of the cheese. If you see white spots on it, that's just salt pockets from the aging process. They're not dangerous.

I also freeze the rinds once I've grated off the cheese. You can put them in soups, stews and long-cooked sauces for additional savory flavor.
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