"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-27-2006, 07:40 AM   #11
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Quote:
Originally Posted by expatgirl
however, on the too salty side believe me you can help to rectify that by adding a raw potato(s) to the stew, soup, sauce, etc., and that will help to draw out that extra salt.
This is actually an old wives tale that is not really true. Read the article here that explains it.
__________________

__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2006, 09:21 AM   #12
Master Chef
 
expatgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Texas girl living in Kazakhstan
Posts: 5,575
Thank you for the posting

I read this article with a lot of interest and even researched the author's background--quite impressive. I'm interested in reading his latest book--any cooking enthusiast would probably as well.. But I'm going to be hard-headed about the reduction of the salty taste for me using potatos because I've been there. Maybe my saltiness taste factor has a lower threshhold as I'm sensitive to it anyway being on a restricted sodium diet to begin with. Maybe someone who has dumped more salt into their soup wouldn't know the difference at all if they dumped several potatos to counterbalance it. But that's what this forum is for. If not for you, I never would have heard of Robert Wolke. So I thank you.
__________________

__________________
expatgirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2006, 10:33 AM   #13
Cook
 
Ham Hock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 76
A one ounce jigger is worth a gallon jug of cure.
__________________
Ham Hock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2006, 02:25 PM   #14
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,263
Wolke's 2 Einstein books are very interesting and highly recommended, IMO. But he isn't the only one to debunk the potato theory.

Potatoes or carrots or pasta or a cellulose sponge will soak up whatever liquid it's put in. Thus it does absorb some of the salt as well as other things which have been dissolved in the liquid (capsaicin, sugar, citric acid, etc) . But it doesn't selectively absorb just the salt, capsaicin, sugar, or citric acid. It just removes some of the flavored liquid.

You're just as well off removing some of the liquid and replacing it with the same liquid sans the salt.
__________________
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2006, 07:23 PM   #15
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Wolke's books are facinating and anyone who loves to read about food should check them out. At times they can be a bit scientific, but don't let that scare you. They are written so anyone can get a lot out of them.

His piece on potatoes and salt is scientifically sound as his tests show so he has proven that the potato will not decrease the concentration of salt, but in the end the only thing that matters is your perception so if you feel it works for you as many people do then continue to do it
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2006, 08:50 PM   #16
Master Chef
 
expatgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Texas girl living in Kazakhstan
Posts: 5,575
That makes sense that you're better off just adding more liquid rather than sacrificing flavor--plus you can always add salt-free stock. After my past fiascos with too much salt in soup I just add half of what the recipe calls for and taste test from there. Seems to work for me. Looking forward to reading Wolke's books.
__________________

__________________
expatgirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:20 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.