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Old 06-21-2011, 11:28 PM   #21
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I'm also in the US but I know in this region wild game is a big deal, especially venison of the white tail variety and fish caught in the local lakes, streams, and rivers (whitefish, pike, walleye, small mouth bass, perch, lake trout, brook trout, smelt, salmon). Smoked lake trout and smoked whitefish are really popular. We also have wild raspberries, apples, chokecherries (they make excellent jelly) and blueberries (you haven't had blueberries until you've had wild blueberries). Some lucky folk know where the morels grow. Cherries are also pretty common, but most of them get brought up from down state, especially around Traverse City's cherry festival. Oh, and maple is huge in this area. Maple syrup, maple candy, maple fudge and ice cream, maple in baked beans and on baked hams, even a few who put maple in their chili. And of course, you can't leave out the pasty. You can find evidence of this here Pasties: The Meaty Center Of 'Yooper' Food : NPR and here Real Michigan Food: The Pasty Absolute Michigan. Common ingredients for U.P. pasties are pork, beef or turkey, onion, worcestershire sauce, potatoes, black pepper, and of course rutabaga. Sprout informed me that carrots are controversial. Some people love them with the rutabaga and others think it's an abomination.
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Old 06-22-2011, 02:49 AM   #22
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All this food talk is making me hungry!!! As I thought, local people do eat different things to what we see on TV. I've never been to the US but any country that is home to good old Tabasco sounds good to me. Can't live without it..lol! We only hear about Americans eating burgers and blueberry pancakes. I've been to Barcelona but Spanish cuisine doesn't excite me that much, just loved the pealla! It's always nice to hear about cultures and tradition.
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Old 06-22-2011, 01:57 PM   #23
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Re Cajun spice blends--the 2 most well-known chefs with spice blends are Emeril Lagasse & PaulPrudhomme. If they're not available in Botswana, they can be bought online, or if that isn't possible, google each of them as all of Emeril's spice blend recipes are online, and some of Prudhomme's. Also Prudhomme is credited with "inventing" blackening, so plenty of recipes and techniques accessible on the net, probably videos too on youtube.
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Old 06-22-2011, 03:33 PM   #24
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@Snip, mmmm, hamburgers and blueberry pancakes. I'll only eat homemade blueberry pancakes anymore. I've been spoiled for way to long with my dad's (Goodweed) recipe. I think buckwheat blueberry pancakes with just a tiny drizzle of honey on top are my favorite. Blueberry pancakes in general are a regional favorite especially when the wild blueberries are in season. The favorite hamburger in this area seems to be the grilled hockey puck, aka a burger so burnt on the grill you might as well be eating a hockey puck and could use them to play street hockey with. I've heard people swear they are the best way to eat a burger and complain that properly cooked ones aren't done enough. Personally, I think black and crunchy enough on the outside to chip a tooth on while rubbery or sawdusty on the inside is gross, but I seem to be in the minority in this town.
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Old 06-22-2011, 05:58 PM   #25
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Here in northeastern N.C., pit cooked pork barbecue is a traditional favorite. Collard greens,, butterbeans cooked slow with a piece of side meat or ham hock, brunswick stew, fish muddle, cornbread(generally fried as opposed to baked), well... this list could grow quite long. and as it is nearly suppertime...I reckon I will let that do.
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Old 06-22-2011, 06:03 PM   #26
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I always wondered where the edge of the great dismal swamp was located, Hoot.
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Old 06-22-2011, 08:17 PM   #27
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eggs, scrambled with thin slices of bitter melon, crumbled tofu and meat stripped from fish bones. braised pig's ears. purple sweet potato buried in a smoldering pile of leaves. sugar cane from irate, machete-wielding farmers. wild onion crepe.

... breakfast menudo stew of hominy beans and cow tripe.
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Old 06-22-2011, 08:26 PM   #28
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French Canadian here too Rock - I'm Acadian - the cajuns are deported Acadians, who the queen deported when they refused to fight in the war.
I'd have to add seafood to your list. Lobster, crab, shellfish, seafood soup
Dandelion wine! My grandpa would make my mom and her siblings go out to the fields and pick dandelions for this.
Anything molasses.. molasses pie.. molasses pancakes...
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Old 06-22-2011, 08:45 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spork View Post
... breakfast menudo stew of hominy beans and cow tripe.
This is wonderful stuff!!......I learned about it from the owner of a mexican restaurant in town.
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Old 06-22-2011, 08:53 PM   #30
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From the Upper Midwest of US, lefse (like tortillas from riced potatoes), hotdish (cream of anything with noodles or rice, some sort of protein, chopped celery, etc.), beef and pork. Horseradish, rhubarb. Lutefisk (blech - nasty stuff cured in lye).
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