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Old 11-21-2010, 01:26 PM   #1
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Transporting cooked lamb

Hello,

I am planning on making herb crusted lamb chops for a dinner gathering 3 hours away. How can I safely transport the finished product to my destination while preserving quality. Should cook it ahead of time, then refrigerate and transport it cold, then reheat? I am worried about the lamb getting harder. Any advice would help. Thanks,

MH

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Old 11-21-2010, 01:32 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by mhmh View Post
Hello,

I am planning on making herb crusted lamb chops for a dinner gathering 3 hours away. How can I safely transport the finished product to my destination while preserving quality. Should cook it ahead of time, then refrigerate and transport it cold, then reheat? I am worried about the lamb getting harder. Any advice would help. Thanks,

MH
We've been discussing this problem. My favorite method is to wrap well while hot, in foil, and place in an icecooler wrapped in towels you don't care about. Wrap whole cooler in an old blanket, get back up to temp when you reach destination. The insulation of the cooler should help keep the heat in.
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Old 11-21-2010, 01:33 PM   #3
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An igloo cooler is an excellent way to transport hot items. The insulation keeps things hot too. Load the bottom of the cooler with clean dry towels. Put the meat in a disposable foil container and seal with aluminum foil then place in cooler. Fill remaining space with more clean dry towels. It will easily stay hot for 3 - 4 hours.


.40
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Old 11-21-2010, 01:55 PM   #4
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great advice. Thank you so much!!
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Old 11-21-2010, 02:01 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by forty_caliber View Post
An igloo cooler is an excellent way to transport hot items. The insulation keeps things hot too. Load the bottom of the cooler with clean dry towels. Put the meat in a disposable foil container and seal with aluminum foil then place in cooler. Fill remaining space with more clean dry towels. It will easily stay hot for 3 - 4 hours.


.40

Quote:
Put the meat in a disposable foil container and seal with aluminum foil then place in cooler.
Instead of a disposable foil container, I would use a hot stoneware casserole if you have one. Stoneware holds the heat for a long time, then prepare for transport as either Princes or .40 suggested.
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Old 11-21-2010, 02:35 PM   #6
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Be mindful that your crust doesn't get too soggy from the condensation that will develope if you wrap it to tight and while it is still warm. It may fall off. I wouldn't wrap it too tight and I would unwrap it near the end of reheating to crisp up the crust a bit.
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Old 11-21-2010, 05:33 PM   #7
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Be mindful that your crust doesn't get too soggy from the condensation that will develope if you wrap it to tight and while it is still warm. It may fall off. I wouldn't wrap it too tight and I would unwrap it near the end of reheating to crisp up the crust a bit.
In addition to the above:
I would certainly way undercook that lamb before you pack it up. Reheating the dish can finish the cooking, as you sure don't want over cooked lamb.
Let us know what happens. Personally, this is not a dish I would attempt to transport. It's not possible for you to prepare it at your destination?
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Old 11-22-2010, 11:08 AM   #8
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In addition to the above:
I would certainly way undercook that lamb before you pack it up. Reheating the dish can finish the cooking, as you sure don't want over cooked lamb.
Let us know what happens. Personally, this is not a dish I would attempt to transport. It's not possible for you to prepare it at your destination?
I agree, not a dish I would want to try to transport.
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Old 11-22-2010, 07:50 PM   #9
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This is what I did.

I had a similar problem with carrying a trukey dinner 75 miles. I bought a cooler .. the kind you fill with ice and beer and soda pop - that was large enough to hold my turkey in the covered baking pan. Instead of ice, I put a baking rack bottom and filled it just to the rack with boiling water. I set the turkey roaster plus bowls with pototoes, veggie and gravy. The other cooler had ice for the wine cranberries and a fruit salad.
Off we went. Everything was ready to take out of the coolers and eat.

If the moist heat will not ruin the "encrusted" part of the lamb chops, you could conceivably, I think, under cook them just a little before you cover them and set them in the cooler and quickly close and lock the lid.

Don't peek. Every time you open the lid the water cools just a tad too much. Do keep the cooler covered and in the warmest part of your car if at all possible.

Good luck! I love lamb, but I have never tried to transport it. .






Quote:
Originally Posted by mhmh View Post
Hello,

I am planning on making herb crusted lamb chops for a dinner gathering 3 hours away. How can I safely transport the finished product to my destination while preserving quality. Should cook it ahead of time, then refrigerate and transport it cold, then reheat? I am worried about the lamb getting harder. Any advice would help. Thanks,

MH
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Old 11-22-2010, 08:37 PM   #10
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From your OP, you imply that you may be able to cook the lamb at the destination. If so, you could do the prep and the cooking after arriving. Lamb chops take only minutes to cook, and should be served very hot and not overcooked. I don't think that you will be satisfied with reheating or trying to hold heat for what is going to amount to 3 hours.
If you have them, you might want to carry your own small grill, George Foreman, of Weber with you.
Sorry, I would not try this. Lukewarm or overcooked lamb leaves a lot to be desired.
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