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Old 01-03-2013, 04:55 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
Metal cookie cutters in the bottom of the crock should work as a wire rack. Cover the bottom with them.
Canning rings can work well too.
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Old 01-03-2013, 06:27 PM   #32
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If you want to try out SV just us a large pot. Fill 3/4 with water. Use your back small burner. It will take a while for you to experiment with getting a consistent temp of say 145 F. In my case I position the pot only a few inches on the burner. I set the dial to '2' but every stove top is different of course. One advantage of doing this is it sets up a 'convection' and the water gets gently moving up on the burner side than over to the 'off burner' side then down and round and round vertically. This trick is used in commercial restaurants which make a lot of stock. The 'convection' keeps the stock gently moving and what needs to be skimmed off is always collecting at one side of the pot.
Use Zip locks that seal completely and remove all the air. I don't trust these bags to keep the water out so I use a big enough bag (reusable) to fold the top of the bag over the rim of the pot. When I put the glass lid on it holds the bag along the side, but so what, and I position the bag so it doesn't touch the bottom of the pot. When the water temp has reached say 145 F I put in the Zip lock. Immediately the water temp. falls right? I check the temp. periodically. When the temp. has gone back up to 145 F I let the food continue to stay in the water bath for another length of time. By now I've got a pretty good idea how long the method takes to SV a small roast or thick cut pork chops for instance. I always keep accurate notes on SV times to make life easier next time. Right now I'm doing some experiments using different vegetables. I added a bit of clarified butter and couple of drops of fresh lemon juice and a sprig of time. I believe this is the direction SV cooking is heading. At least around here. The beets were cooked to perfection and the added ingredients had time to 'meld' with the beets.
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Old 01-03-2013, 07:57 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
If you want to try out SV just us a large pot. Fill 3/4 with water. Use your back small burner. It will take a while for you to experiment with getting a consistent temp of say 145 F. In my case I position the pot only a few inches on the burner. I set the dial to '2' but every stove top is different of course. One advantage of doing this is it sets up a 'convection' and the water gets gently moving up on the burner side than over to the 'off burner' side then down and round and round vertically. This trick is used in commercial restaurants which make a lot of stock. The 'convection' keeps the stock gently moving and what needs to be skimmed off is always collecting at one side of the pot.
Use Zip locks that seal completely and remove all the air. I don't trust these bags to keep the water out so I use a big enough bag (reusable) to fold the top of the bag over the rim of the pot. When I put the glass lid on it holds the bag along the side, but so what, and I position the bag so it doesn't touch the bottom of the pot. When the water temp has reached say 145 F I put in the Zip lock. Immediately the water temp. falls right? I check the temp. periodically. When the temp. has gone back up to 145 F I let the food continue to stay in the water bath for another length of time. By now I've got a pretty good idea how long the method takes to SV a small roast or thick cut pork chops for instance. I always keep accurate notes on SV times to make life easier next time. Right now I'm doing some experiments using different vegetables. I added a bit of clarified butter and couple of drops of fresh lemon juice and a sprig of time. I believe this is the direction SV cooking is heading. At least around here. The beets were cooked to perfection and the added ingredients had time to 'meld' with the beets.
Having read all of that Puffin, I'm even more convinced that the following is a good idea. The temp. can be maintained without any effort whatsoever, and naturally it would be ideal for deep frying and other cooking applications.

I'm seriously thinking about this one..
Amazon.com: Spt 1300-Watt Induction Cooktop, Silver: Kitchen & Dining
along with this pot in the 6 qt. size...
http://www.amazon.com/Whole-Clad-Sta...ref=pd_sim_k_4
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Old 01-03-2013, 08:33 PM   #34
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That looks like an excellent appliance. I'm going to buy one right away. What do you think of SV on the indiction cooking veg but adding herbs, butter whatever? I have a really large SS pot already.
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Old 01-03-2013, 08:46 PM   #35
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puffin 3, has anybody told you how positively ingenious you are? do you work in the food industry, puffin?
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Old 01-03-2013, 09:11 PM   #36
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puffin 3, has anybody told you how positively ingenious you are? do you work in the food industry, puffin?
Thanks, maybe it comes from growing up on a farm in Alberta. Also I commercial fished for a couple of decades off Vancouver Island and drove boom boats, and 'sidewinders' and barges and tug boats and ferries for more decades. In the work I did where I did it We were 911! If something broke you fixed it or sunk.' I am happy to say that I was 'ingenious' enough to know I wasn't any good in the restaurant industry and got out barely with my shirt. Too many years working alone or with just an deckhand or two didn't prepare me for all the BS involved in dealing with a bunch of strangers wanting to know why their meal was two hours late. I couldn't tell them my chef and sous chef had both come in again late. Both were loaded. Both loved the same waitress. Fixing things and being creative in my kitchen is my favorite thing to do.
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Old 01-04-2013, 01:34 AM   #37
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I've used the SV method a few times now, and have been happy with the results. I've been using a large stock pot on the stove, like you suggested. I'm just exploring options for leaving it unattended for longer periods of time. Not sure I would be comfortable leaving a pot on the stove, hanging off a burner for very long, even if it maintains the right temperature. Hence the crockpot idea :) I'm planning to do a rump roast at some point, and it could take quite a long time to melt the tendons and connective tissue at such a low temperature. (I believe my cookbook says 72 hours!!) I might do a rack of ribs this way as well, depending how the roast turns out.

Oh, I did a sous vide meatloaf yesterday, and it was divine!! Best meatloaf I've ever had. It was so juicy that when I pulled the meat thermometer out, even after letting it rest, it spewed juices like a stuck pig! Yum!
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Old 01-04-2013, 02:16 AM   #38
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yum. sous vide is so delicious. the food cooked so perfectly, then sear/warm @ your leisure. that looks great!
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Old 01-04-2013, 08:30 AM   #39
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Okay, how do you measure the temperature of the food in SV cooking without poking a hole in the bag and letting in water?
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Old 01-04-2013, 08:43 AM   #40
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B/c I use re sealable Zip locks. When I want to check the temp I remove the lid which is holding the top of the Zip lock to the top edge of the pot and open the bag and stick the probe in. Here's good site where you can get a good idea of different basic SV cooking times: SousVide Supreme | Official Site: sous vide cooking times and temperatures: SousVide Supreme | Official Site
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