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Old 08-23-2012, 03:19 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by no mayonnaise View Post
On the same note, if a person is giving a recipe in volume, then how reputable are they for a baking recipe in the first place?

Baking = formulas. Not recipes.
I guess I should note that I come from a family of bakers. The company was bought out by Flours Foods a few years back, but all my baking formulas come from family members and are given in weights and hydration percentage. So there's that...
Sounds like Flowers Foods.
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Old 08-23-2012, 05:33 PM   #12
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Hello Luca, as I live in England I find recipes giving cups as a measure rather than weight perplexing. I keep meaning to buy a set of U.S.A. cup measures but only remember when I am reading the actual recipe, and so it goes on. Metric weight is my preference.

I would like the size of the onion to be stated too, unless it was given by weight. Half a large onion or half a small one - a lot of difference.

I think I really agree with no mayonnaise in this (really love mayonnaise though).
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Old 08-24-2012, 03:38 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by no mayonnaise View Post
In my opinion, measurements should be given to reflect the most accurate way to measure an ingredient.
...
Quantities like a "bunch" or "handful" really annoy me. They have no place in a recipe IMO.
As for flour, it depends on whether it's for cooking or baking. For baking, flour should NEVER be given in volume, and only given in weight.
...
Quote:
Originally Posted by no mayonnaise View Post
...
Baking = formulas. Not recipes.
Quote:
Originally Posted by no mayonnaise View Post
...
The best measurement would be weight, followed by fraction of a size, followed by volume--In my opinion.
Thank you no mayonnaise

So lesson learned for me:
1. stay away from baking
2. use weight, not volume
3. do not use vague quantities

Third point conflicts with second one. If I need to use parsley, and I cannot say a handful of parsley, I'll say "half a cup", but I'll never say "20 grams". I think the problem arises only with some ingredients, like parsley or rosemary. But we are talking about recipes, not baking, so some level of uncertainty may be allowed.
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Old 08-24-2012, 03:42 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by FrankZ View Post
I second Hoot seconding Steve..

I think it is fine to give baking flour in volumes. The problem is most people don't know how to properly measure flour and end up with way too much, which can be an issue with baking. I prefer to use weight (in grams) but I also look at recipes with cups and convert (in my head no less).
Thanks FrankZ

Ok for weight in grams.
Now I realize I tend to think in terms of weight for solid ingredients, in terms of volume for liquid ingredients, while taking no exact position for powders or grains (flour, salt, grated cheese). That's interesting.
Well, maybe it comes from the habit to ask for a liter of milk, not a kg (or what it is...).
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Old 08-24-2012, 03:46 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
The recipe should indicate the size of the cut, chop, dice, mince. Otherwise, the most accurate would be weight. Half an onion? How big of an onion?

I agree on 'bunch' and 'handful'. Also a 'small can'.
Thanks Andy M.

Bunch and handful rehabilitated, for onions and similar ingredients I'll show both: Half a small onion finely chopped (xxx grams)
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Old 08-24-2012, 03:52 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by acerbicacid View Post
Hello Luca, as I live in England I find recipes giving cups as a measure rather than weight perplexing. I keep meaning to buy a set of U.S.A. cup measures but only remember when I am reading the actual recipe, and so it goes on. Metric weight is my preference.

I would like the size of the onion to be stated too, unless it was given by weight. Half a large onion or half a small one - a lot of difference.

I think I really agree with no mayonnaise in this (really love mayonnaise though).
acerbicacid, I love British puns! Sometimes I can even understand them

Ok, for now:
metric weight for solid ingredients
metric weight + cup volume for liquid ingredients
number of pieces + size of the pieces for things like onions
uncertain definitions for ingredients like parsley OR volume definition for the chopped/diced etc. ingredient
AND
teaspoon/tablespoon measurements when needed. A teaspoon of freshly grounded black pepper is better then 12,7 grams of it, IMHO
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Old 08-24-2012, 04:52 AM   #17
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Good morning Luca (well it is here, morning that is)

Completely agree with you when you say "teaspoon/tablespoon measurements when needed. A teaspoon of freshly grounded black pepper is better then 12,7 grams of it, IMHO"

I hadn't even thought of that, can't imagine trying to actually weigh teaspoon freshly ground black pepper. :-)

Can I post smilies on quick replies I wonder.
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Old 08-24-2012, 08:22 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by justplainbill View Post
Sounds like Flowers Foods.
Yep, Flowers Foods. I was typing "flour" so much I skipped right over that typo.
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Old 08-24-2012, 09:36 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by no mayonnaise View Post
On the same note, if a person is giving a recipe in volume, then how reputable are they for a baking recipe in the first place?

Baking = formulas. Not recipes.
I guess I should note that I come from a family of bakers. The company was bought out by Flours Foods a few years back, but all my baking formulas come from family members and are given in weights and hydration percentage. So there's that...
Recipe or formula, how do you know if they are reputable?

I use a formula for my bread, but people have been baking at home for a long time with a recipe, some more successful than others. If someone refuses to follow a recipe, what makes you think they would follow a formula?

Conveying the quantities to help someone is the first step. After that it is just fine tuning and better understanding.
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Old 08-24-2012, 09:51 AM   #20
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...
Conveying the quantities to help someone is the first step. After that it is just fine tuning and better understanding.
So true.
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