"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-23-2016, 10:51 PM   #11
Head Chef
 
Kaneohegirlinaz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: The Gateway to the Grand Canyon, wishing I was back home in Hawaii
Posts: 1,799
I wasn't trying to "shame" anybody here with my post, but I was recalling why I no longer buy helper anything, as CG stated there are alternatives to that, and isn't that why we're all here? To share in different methods of putting nutritious food on the table for our loved ones...
And, heh, we've (my husband and I) have been poor like us we deal with what we can get a hold of. YUP! I think all of us here at some point in our lives have been there.
Rockey_F_Squirrell make no mistake, you aren't disappointing any of us. We're here to uplift and encourage each other... my tongue in cheek post was more poking fun at Betty Crocker, that wholesome conglomerate ... NOT you honey! We love new kids on the block and surely would love to point you in different directions of nutritious, inexpensive meals for you and your family. Search some of the previous threads and the way that we all encourage each other at DC.
So, there's no shame goin' on here, that's for sure.
__________________

__________________
My Kitchen In The Middle Of The Desert ~ Wait, What? This Isn't Hawaii?
https://mykitcheninthemiddleofthedesert.wordpress.com/
Kaneohegirlinaz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2016, 11:08 PM   #12
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Katie H's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: I live in the Heartland of the United States - Western Kentucky
Posts: 15,162
I've never been a "boxed" food user even when, as a single mom of several little ones, I faced eviction multiple times and struggled financially. Just that I've always cooked from scratch. Maybe what I prepared was minimal and mediocre but we all had something to eat.

I have ventured into the boxed food world and discovered that I can't eat any of what I've tried due to the salty taste, to me, of what I've tried. I've never been much of a salt eater and all the packaged foods seem extremely salty to me so I stay away from them.

I think many families rely on the "helper" types of foods because of time constraints and what might be viewed as an economical way of feeding themselves and/or their families. In the end, I believe my own scratch foods are prepared in about the same amount of time and are less expensive.

I wish Rockey well in his journey to feed his family. It's not the easiest thing to do when moths fly out of one's wallet.
__________________

__________________
"As a girl I had zero interest in the stove." - Julia Child
This is real inspiration. Look what Julia became!
Katie H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-24-2016, 06:36 AM   #13
Master Chef
 
Aunt Bea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: near Mount Pilot
Posts: 7,006
My cooking experience is similar to Katie's.

I started cooking before Hamburger Helper came along and I didn't always have a can of cream of something soup in the cupboard. I made this simple skillet dinner and it's many, many variations.

1 pound ground meat Sausage, turkey, hamburger, venison, etc...
2 Tablespoons flour
3 cups liquid A combination of milk, water, tomato juice, beef broth, chicken broth etc...
1 Tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
Salt, pepper, onion, powder, garlic powder, etc..., to taste.
2 1/2 - 3 cups of uncooked egg noodles

Brown meat in skillet and break into crumbles as it cooks, drain all but 2 tablespoons of fat from pan, sprinkle flour over ground meat and stir for a minute or so, gradually add the liquid and continue stirring, add Worcestershire sauce and season to taste, stir in egg noodles and simmer for 8-10 minutes stirring occasionally, until the egg noodles are tender.

This can be made a thousand different ways with the addition of mushrooms, green beans, mixed vegetable, an onion, minced celery, etc...

You can also cut the liquid amount down to 1 1/2-2cups, leave out the noodles and make a thicker mixture to serve over mashed potatoes, rice, biscuits, etc...

Good luck!
__________________
Aunt Bea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-24-2016, 11:03 AM   #14
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Calosso, Piemonte
Posts: 311
I confess ignorance! What the hell is a 'helper'? I await replies so that I can understand what 'helper' means, then I can take into consideration when i try dishes both old and new. Many thanks



di reston

Enough is never as good as a feast- Oscar Wilde
__________________
di reston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-24-2016, 11:05 AM   #15
Master Chef
 
Aunt Bea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: near Mount Pilot
Posts: 7,006
Quote:
Originally Posted by di reston View Post
I confess ignorance! What the hell is a 'helper'? I await replies so that I can understand what 'helper' means, then I can take into consideration when i try dishes both old and new. Many thanks



di reston

Enough is never as good as a feast- Oscar Wilde
Take a look!

Helper
__________________
Aunt Bea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-24-2016, 12:14 PM   #16
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
There are a good many budget freindly dishes that taste great, if you get tired of Helper type boxed meals. Here's a few.

1. Goulash. Though not the authentic Hungarian dish, it was delilcious.
Brown 1 lb. ground beef. While that's going on, boil a cup of elbo macaroni for about ten minutes, or whatever your favorite pasta shape is. When the pasta is done, drain and add the drained ground beef. Add a can of diced tomato, along with a teaspoon each of dried oregano, basil, and thyme. Dice and onion and add it. Dice a bell pepper and add it. Cover and let simmer until the veggies are softened. You can also add mushrooms to this if so inclined.

2. New England Boiled Dinner - 1 chunk of inexpensive cut of beef (corned beef, rump roast, etc.) 3 potatoes washed and cut into bite-sized chunks; 3 carrots, washed, peeled and sliced into small chunks; 1 stalk celery, washed and sliced; 1 head of green cabbage, quartered with eaqch quarter sliced in half; salt and pepper to taste. Cover everything with water, cover and bring to a boil. Simmer for an hour. Serve with crusty, buttered bread.

Gotta go, but others can give you a bunch of budget friendly meals that are nourishing and delicious, and easy to make.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-24-2016, 04:18 PM   #17
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,914
Quote:
Cheeseburger Macaroni
Enriched Macaroni (wheat flour, niacin, ferrous sulfate, thiamin mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), Corn Starch, Salt, Enriched Flour (wheat flour, niacin, iron, thiamin mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), Sugar, Ricotta Cheese* (whey, milkfat, lactic acid, salt), Tomato*, Monosodium Glutamate, Maltodextrin, Citric Acid, Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Modified Corn Starch, Natural and Artificial Flavor, Paprika, Spice, Color (yellow lakes 5 & 6, yellows 5 & 6), Mono and Diglycerides, Cheddar Cheese* (milk, cheese cultures, salt, enzymes), Yeast Extract, Enzyme Modified Blue Cheese (milk, cheese cultures, salt, enzymes), Cream, Whey, Enzyme Modified Cheddar Cheese (milk, cheese cultures, salt, enzymes), Butter Oil, Nonfat Milk, Blue Cheese* (milk, salt, cheese cultures, enzymes), Sodium Caseinate, Silicon Dioxide (anticaking agent), Sodium Phosphate, Sodium Citrate, Calcium Caseinate, Enzymes.*Dried
Reading food labels involves understanding what's on them, not just how many there are, so let's take a closer look at these ingredients. We all know that processed foods tend to be high in fat, salt and sugar. Beyond that, though, with the exception of Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, I’d like to know why anyone objects to any these ingredients. If you think about it, you probably use most of them when you make a similar dish from scratch; you just don’t call them by their chemical names.
  • Enriched Macaroni (wheat flour, niacin, ferrous sulfate, thiamin mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid) – pasta with added B vitamins (those are their chemical names) and iron, aka ferrous sulfate
  • Corn Starch – for thickening
  • Salt – for seasoning
  • Enriched Flour (wheat flour, niacin, iron, thiamin mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid) – flour with added B vitamins and a different form of iron
  • Sugar – for flavor
  • Ricotta Cheese* (whey, milkfat, lactic acid, salt) – these are the ingredients in ricotta cheese, whether homemade or factory-made
  • Tomato* - self-evident
  • Monosodium Glutamate – MSG, for added savory flavor
  • Maltodextrin – a thickener, it’s easily digestible, being absorbed as rapidly as glucose, and is either moderately sweet or almost flavorless.
  • Citric Acid - a weak organic acid found in citrus fruits, used for flavoring
  • Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil – fat used for making sauce. Not the best one, but not horrible if not over-used. This processing makes it shelf-stable.
  • Modified Corn Starch - used as a stabilizer, thickening agent, or an emulsifier
  • Natural and Artificial Flavor – self-evident
  • Paprika – self-evident
  • Spice – self-evident, although not specified
  • Color (yellow lakes 5 & 6, yellows 5 & 6) – if you buy any orange cheddar cheese, there is color added to it; it’s a creamy color naturally.
  • Mono and Diglycerides – fats that are naturally present in various seed oils
  • Cheddar Cheese* (milk, cheese cultures, salt, enzymes) – more cheese
  • Yeast Extract - the common name for various forms of processed yeast products made by extracting the cell contents (removing the cell walls); they are used as food additives or flavorings, or as nutrients for bacterial culture media
  • Enzyme Modified Blue Cheese (milk, cheese cultures, salt, enzymes) – cheese ingredients
  • Cream – self-evident
  • Whey – self-evident
  • Enzyme Modified Cheddar Cheese (milk, cheese cultures, salt, enzymes) – more cheese
  • Butter Oil – aka butter fat
  • Nonfat Milk – self-evident
  • Blue Cheese* (milk, salt, cheese cultures, enzymes) – more cheese
  • Sodium Caseinate – milk protein
  • Silicon Dioxide (anticaking agent) – occurs naturally in foods and is very important for normal development of bones; it's also necessary to maintain healthy skin, hair, and nails.
  • Sodium Phosphate – a type of salt, used as an anti-clumping agent
  • Sodium Citrate - used as an acidity regulator in food and drinks, and also as emulsifier for oils. It enables cheeses to melt without becoming greasy.
  • Calcium Caseinate – dried milk protein that dissolves easily in water
  • Enzymes - enzymes accelerate, or catalyze, chemical reactions.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-24-2016, 04:41 PM   #18
Executive Chef
 
Sir_Loin_of_Beef's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Sir Francis Drake Hotel
Posts: 4,888
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
All those asterisks and parenthetical entries!

I hate seeing "sugar" up there above things like "dried cheese" and "dried tomato". For crying out loud, it isn't dessert.
I'm more bothered by the salt that is so high on the list, even above the sugar.
__________________
Life is much more manageable when thought of as a scavenger hunt as opposed to a surprise party - Jimmy Buffett
Sir_Loin_of_Beef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-24-2016, 04:50 PM   #19
Executive Chef
 
Sir_Loin_of_Beef's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Sir Francis Drake Hotel
Posts: 4,888
A couple of things I used to throw together on a Sunday afternoon for my kid to heat up in the microwave for lunch during the summer when there was no school, but there was still work:

Cook up two pounds of ground beef, and add 2 cups of spaghetti sauce, home made or jarred and divide it in half. Served on burger buns, I called them Sloppy Guiseppes. Add a pound of some type of small macaroni like elbows or tiny shells to the other half and add a little more sauce if necessary and you have home made beef-a-roni.
__________________
Life is much more manageable when thought of as a scavenger hunt as opposed to a surprise party - Jimmy Buffett
Sir_Loin_of_Beef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-24-2016, 05:24 PM   #20
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,914
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaneohegirlinaz View Post
I wasn't trying to "shame" anybody here with my post, but I was recalling why I no longer buy helper anything, as CG stated there are alternatives to that, and isn't that why we're all here? To share in different methods of putting nutritious food on the table for our loved ones...
I'm sure you didn't intend it, but the way it came across was, "I quit eating that stuff a long time ago because OMG LOOK AT THAT LONG LIST OF INGREDIENTS AAAAAAHHHHHHH!!!"

I think you can understand how that might not be perceived as encouraging
__________________

__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
ham, hamburger

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:50 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.