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Old 01-21-2015, 05:11 AM   #1
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Using preservatives in food

Hi

we are in the process of making some home made chutney

just wondering if there are any guidelines on how use to Preservative so it does not spoil easily

thanks in advance

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Old 01-21-2015, 05:47 AM   #2
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This might help answer your question.

National Center for Home Food Preservation | NCHFP Publications
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Old 01-22-2015, 07:29 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by ion View Post
Hi

we are in the process of making some home made chutney

just wondering if there are any guidelines on how use to Preservative so it does not spoil easily

thanks in advance
A chutney maker of 40 summers replies.

The vinegar (it's important to use vinegar with a minimum of 5% acidity - 6% is better) and the sugar in the chutney recipes, the boiling and the proper sealing of the jars does the preserving. That's the point of chutney. You don't need additional preservatives. Most of the recipes I use say you can keep the results for a year. Not in my family you can't - unless you hide them carefully . Seriously though, I've kept some of mine for nearly two years and they have been fine. In fact most chutneys improve with storing for a couple of months.

However, be careful with Indian recipes for chutneys to be eaten as a side dish to a main course. They are often not intended for long keeping.
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Old 01-22-2015, 07:44 PM   #4
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Interesting article. I'd never come across canning of jam, chutney, etc., before I started taking an interest in American cooking. It isn't done with home-made chutneys and jams over here. The cooking is considered enough to preserve the chutney, jam, etc. I suppose it could be something to do with the climate in north America. You seem to have hotter summers than we do which might be significant.
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Old 01-23-2015, 02:52 AM   #5
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Interesting article. I'd never come across canning of jam, chutney, etc., before I started taking an interest in American cooking. It isn't done with home-made chutneys and jams over here. The cooking is considered enough to preserve the chutney, jam, etc. I suppose it could be something to do with the climate in north America. You seem to have hotter summers than we do which might be significant.
I think it has more to do with American germiphobia and our growing ignorance about food. When I was growing up we always sealed jams with a thin layer of melted paraffin. The chutney would have been brought to a boil and sealed in a sterilized canning jar with a new lid. I was surprised to learn that our New York state fair will no longer accept any jams or jellies sealed with paraffin in cooking contests, all entries must be canned. To me the extra step of canning is sort of a belt and suspenders approach. I suppose it's better to be safe than sorry.
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Old 01-23-2015, 08:59 AM   #6
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I think it has more to do with American germiphobia and our growing ignorance about food. When I was growing up we always sealed jams with a thin layer of melted paraffin. The chutney would have been brought to a boil and sealed in a sterilized canning jar with a new lid. I was surprised to learn that our New York state fair will no longer accept any jams or jellies sealed with paraffin in cooking contests, all entries must be canned. To me the extra step of canning is sort of a belt and suspenders approach. I suppose it's better to be safe than sorry.
Yes, the paraffin wax method used to be common here but most modern books on preserving now tend to speak against it.

It's surprising that us oldies survived as long as we have!
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Old 01-23-2015, 12:27 PM   #7
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Using preservatives in food

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Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
Yes, the paraffin wax method used to be common here but most modern books on preserving now tend to speak against it.

It's surprising that us oldies survived as long as we have!

My grandma and great aunt were both excellent cooks and always sealed their jellies and jams with paraffin too. When I first started making jelly I did the same.
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