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Old 04-27-2007, 11:22 AM   #11
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so she had a "run" on her stockings" and your Dad was the culprit?
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Old 04-27-2007, 11:35 AM   #12
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I find the vidalias are too sweet & valuable to cook with.
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Old 04-27-2007, 11:40 AM   #13
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I don't actually cook with them either. They don't have enough of the onion flavor that most dishes require. I just slice them raw with tomatoes and cottage cheese or cook in a little soy sauce and butter or roast them. My son and I can go through a 25 pound bag in a couple of weeks! They are supposed to be a great anti-cancer food too. Vidalias, fresh asparagas and wild mushroom time is here, yea Spring!
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Old 04-27-2007, 12:04 PM   #14
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Yes, kades, I know the nylon stocking trick, too. I wrote about it in one of my columns a couple of years ago.

We like baked Vidalias with roast beef. Try this:

BAKED VIDALIA ONIONS
(Serves 4)

4 Vidalia onions, peeled
4 beef bouillon cubes
4 Tbsp. butter
Water

In the root end of each peeled onion, scoop out a well with a spoon or a melon baller. Place the four onions in an 8-inch square baking dish or a 10-inch pie plate. Put a bouillon cube in each well. Top with butter. Pour about 1/4-inch of water in pan and cover tightly with foil. Bake in preheated 350-degree oven for 1 hour. Serve hot.

You won't believe how these turn out. I can almost make a meal out of these.
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Old 04-28-2007, 12:28 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie E
Yes, kades, I know the nylon stocking trick, too. I wrote about it in one of my columns a couple of years ago.

We like baked Vidalias with roast beef. Try this:

BAKED VIDALIA ONIONS
(Serves 4)


4 Vidalia onions, peeled


4 beef bouillon cubes


4 Tbsp. butter


Water



In the root end of each peeled onion, scoop out a well with a spoon or a melon baller. Place the four onions in an 8-inch square baking dish or a 10-inch pie plate. Put a bouillon cube in each well. Top with butter. Pour about 1/4-inch of water in pan and cover tightly with foil. Bake in preheated 350-degree oven for 1 hour. Serve hot.



You won't believe how these turn out. I can almost make a meal out of these.

These sound wonderful..Have some I just bought think I'll pick up a few m ore and have them sunday with grilled steaks and dome other goodies. Thanks Katie..
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Old 04-30-2007, 12:43 PM   #16
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I cut my Vidalias in thick slices, brush a little olive oil on the, and grill them with the steaks. Cook them just till they have nice grill marks.
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Old 04-30-2007, 02:15 PM   #17
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As far as I know all of the sweet onions will have a sticker to identify them. The Vidalia and Maui are the same onion (Granex 33) grown in different places, Texas sweet onions are Grano varieties - the sweet (labeled as 502) and the super sweet (labeled as 1015), and from the Northwest we get the Walla Walla sweet. There is a new hybrind I've heard about but have not seen yet, called "candy" which is supposed to be sweeter than the Vadaila or Texas 1015..

Being a single guy and not prone to having a ready cache of used pantyhose around the house ... I don't use the knot and cut method. What I do instead is use the twist-ties that come on bread wrappers to "tie off" between the onions.
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Old 04-30-2007, 07:30 PM   #18
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Next to the Vidalia, I like the Texas 1015. Several years ago Mississippi State University experimented with the Gran-X 33 and produced a sizable crop. Due to poor marketing they never gained much consumer confidence. In comparison to the Vidalia they didn't quite measure up. So in many respects they were D.O.A.
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Old 05-02-2007, 02:17 PM   #19
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I think walla-wallas from Washington state are also the same as Maui and Vidalia. Having visited or lived most of these areas, I have concluded that it isn't just the plant but also that red dirt that is in them (in Hawaii it was a real, true pain .... everything got stained with that red clay). I think that soil is rich in iron, do you think that makes it sweet?
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Old 05-02-2007, 02:33 PM   #20
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I love Vidalia onions. We have a green pepper & onion relish we make from our home grown bell peppers but the problem is that my harvest of peppers is on opposite ends from the Vidalia season.

I got a good buy on a case of Vidalia onions a few years ago and bell peppers were reasonable at the market so we made the relish. It is wonderful with the addition of the Vidalia onion.

The soil can definitely have an effect on the taste of vegetables and especially root crops. I forget most of the stuff I knew in my Organic Gardening days but I do know that we planted radishes a few times in our heavy Ohio clay soil and they were beautiful but they were so hot that it was difficult to eat them. This was because of the components of our soil.
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