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Old 06-09-2019, 07:43 PM   #21
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Then you might want to break the tomatoes up before you put them into the pot, Tyler. If I'm making something that I don't want to be too juicy, I do like tenspeed said and break them up with my hands. That gives you the chance to leave juice behind and cook up just the tomato meat. It's like playing in the mud as a child, but tastier. If you want it a bit smoother once it's cooked, you could use a potato masher to get a more rustic texture.
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Old 06-09-2019, 07:45 PM   #22
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Tomato Paste.
Get the right ratio to water/wine or both and the gravy is perfect. Can always add a bit of water as well when using again for other dishes.
This I use with canned Nina Whole Italian tomatoes. Then use it for pizza, pasta and other Italian dishes that require marinara sauce.
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Old 06-09-2019, 07:59 PM   #23
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Then you might want to break the tomatoes up before you put them into the pot, Tyler. If I'm making something that I don't want to be too juicy, I do like tenspeed said and break them up with my hands. That gives you the chance to leave juice behind and cook up just the tomato meat. It's like playing in the mud as a child, but tastier. If you want it a bit smoother once it's cooked, you could use a potato masher to get a more rustic texture.
I'm on board with you guys now, I'll definitely give it a try next time. Thanks for the tips.
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Old 06-09-2019, 08:36 PM   #24
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You could also drain off some of the liquid the tomatoes are canned with.
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Old 06-09-2019, 08:52 PM   #25
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A friend gave me a tip on removing the clear water/liquid on top of steaming tomatoes. Put a tea towel, or cheese cloth, over the tomatoes, then dip out the clear liquid above the cloth with a big spoon or small cup measure. Now don't throw it out, it is delicious. Chill it and drink it down. We canned up some of that 'juice' and when winter came, my son and I drank 6 quarts of it and wished we had more.
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Old 06-10-2019, 12:08 AM   #26
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In order to thicken the sauce you must simmer uncovered so water can evaporate. If you leave the lid on, simmering longer won’t help.
What Andy said. Leave the lid off and allow it to simmer until it will thicken on its' own when the water evaporates. Stir every so often to make sure what is on the bottom can release the water.

I grew up in an Italian town, and ate at many Italian homes as a child. Never have had pasta sauce that was watery.
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Old 06-10-2019, 05:15 AM   #27
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I'll definitely give it a try, can part of the tomatos be reserved to not be blended? We enjoy some "chunk."
I've never done it, but I can't think of a reason why you couldn't run the carrots and onions through a food processor before sauteeing, and then only mildly chopping the tomatoes with an immersion blender if you want a chunkier sauce. I like using carrots in a marinara, as the sweetness of the carrots offsets the acidity of the tomatoes. Driving water out of carrots brings out the sweetness, which is why roasted carrots taste sweeter than raw carrots. if you are fine with carrot chunks in your marinara then you could always just finely dice them.
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Old 06-10-2019, 06:57 AM   #28
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Smile Regarding the carrots and onions

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I've never done it, but I can't think of a reason why you couldn't run the carrots and onions through a food processor before sauteeing, and then only mildly chopping the tomatoes with an immersion blender if you want a chunkier sauce. I like using carrots in a marinara, as the sweetness of the carrots offsets the acidity of the tomatoes. Driving water out of carrots brings out the sweetness, which is why roasted carrots taste sweeter than raw carrots. if you are fine with carrot chunks in your marinara then you could always just finely dice them.
My carrots and onions disappear into the sauce if I begin with a fine dice, almost a mince, on the onion, and the carrot finely grated on a microplane.
Credit to Mario Batali on the carrot & microplane part.
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Old 06-10-2019, 07:27 AM   #29
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You don't have to squeeze them hard. Just enough to let out the juice. I would suggest you just break them up with your hand over a strainer so the water and juices are saved in the event that you may need them to place in the sauce if it gets just too thick. And don't forget. Just simmer the sauce on low with the cover off. Stir often and check the thickness as it cooks. If needed, then you can add back some of the juice from the tomatoes. A little at a time. Wait until you see all the juice you will get by breaking up the tomatoes and you will then understand why your sauce has been watery.

If squeezing with your hands is not an acceptable practice for you, then cut them with a knife. Just place your cutting board over the strainer that is over a bowl over a bowl and then scrape the chopped tomatoes into the strainer. Including any of the juices on the board. I once had a very serious bad cut on my hand with a thick bandage on it. Squeezing and touching food with that hand was out of the question for me and I had no rubber gloves in the house. So using my finger tips to control movement of the food was the only way I had to cut up the food. I am sure you will find a way to do this squeezing the juice out of the tomatoes to your liking and ease of doing this. Don't do this though when the pan is on the stove and the heat has been turned on the burner.

Do let us know how you make out. You have received some very excellent advice. These folks here know their cooking stuff. Glad to have your aboard. Good luck.
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