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Old 08-08-2006, 05:57 AM   #1
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What does 'half & half' mean?

Hi - I am a New Zealander (Kiwi) about to attempt the following recipe for fudge frosting:
http://www.globalgourmet.com/food/eg.../choccake.html

There is an ingredient called 'half and half' - can someone please tell me what that is - we don't have it in NZ.

Thanks

KM

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Old 08-08-2006, 07:18 AM   #2
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Hiya Katie...from a fellow Kiwi!!

1/2 and 1/2 is basically 1/2 cream and 1/2 milk. You will not be able to whip it and yes...we cannot buy it in NZ. No call for it so no go in the shops!!

It is around 12% butterfat if I recall, but just go buy a small bottle/carton of cream and mix with milk and Bob's ya uncle!!!

Welcome BTW...good to see another Kiwi at this lovely site.
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Old 08-08-2006, 07:35 AM   #3
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Do you have "light cream". That is what half and half is.
Here are some subs.
half-and-half = half & half (10.5 - 18% fat) Substitutes: equal parts cream and milk OR evaporated milk OR 7/8 C milk + 1 ½ tablespoons butter or margarine
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Old 08-08-2006, 07:39 AM   #4
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Hi Gretchen!

No..we have just cream. And what wonderful, thick, yellow ambrosia it is!
I am not bragging ( well..kinda ) but most people who visit from abroad are in raptures over our cream.
When I lived in Italy, I despaired at not being able to easily whip cream bought in shops. And it was white.
Can ya imagine?? It was white. Nope. Not a good look for cream at all.
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Old 08-08-2006, 08:37 AM   #5
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Can't beat Cornish clotted cream, Lynan. Now that really IS cream!

And we don't have half and half, either. We have single, double, extra thick double and clotted creams.
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Old 08-08-2006, 09:35 AM   #6
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In the US, it looks like this:

Heavy cream has a milk fat content of between 36 and 40%
Light whipping cream, 30 to 36%
Light cream (also called coffee or table cream) 18 to 30%
Half and half is 10 to 12% milk fat.
Whole Milk is 3.7% milk fat.
Then there are 2% and 1% milks and...
Skim, which must be less than 0.5% milk fat.
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Old 08-08-2006, 12:27 PM   #7
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I'm with Lynan ... in simple terms it's 1/2 cream (called heavy cream or whipping cream depending on where you live) and 1/2 milk - 1:1 ratio.

It's not to be confused with an "af-n-af" in an Irish pub ...
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Old 08-08-2006, 12:55 PM   #8
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Doesn't commercial half-and-half include some emulsifiers or other non-dairy/chemical ingredients?

I was listening to the food hour lady on the local CBS radio station (KNX in Los Angeles) a couple of weeks ago. Answering a caller's question about some sort of sauce that called for half-and-half, she recommended mixing cream and milk rather than using the store bought half-and-half. She explained that the store-bought half-and-half has additives, which cause it to clot when heated and thus it doesn't incorporate as easily in the sauce. She said the mix of cream and milk works much better.

I haven't tried that, so I don't know if it's accurate -- but she's usually right on with her advice. I did look at carton in the market, and I was surprised to see that it wasn't 100% cow juice.

The food hour lady said that in her opinion, the commercial stuff is good only for coffee and cereal.

Any thoughts?
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Old 08-08-2006, 01:13 PM   #9
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This thread makes me miss growing up on ranches!! We always had at least one milk-cow; my Mom would try to save the cream when it raised to the top before my stepfather could come in and get it. Oh, the memories of the wonderful things she would do with the cream!!!!!!
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Old 08-08-2006, 02:20 PM   #10
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Since the original question was about half and half and he said they didn't have "light cream", what is used for coffee cream?
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