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Old 12-17-2011, 09:56 PM   #171
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USDA Defect Levels Handbook

Defect Levels Handbook
Many years ago, when I taught high school science, I had the USDA defect levels for every item in the school's snack machine. I'd catch a kid nibbling away during my science class, and simply read the defect levels while they munched. After a month, no one ate anything in class. Problem solved without a single phone call home.

I had one former student tell me that she was put off chocolate for years. I was aghast as I never wanted to do that to anyone. I mean, no chocolate has to qualify as some kind of abuse, right? Then she joined the Peace Corps and discovered chocolate-covered ants. Tragedy averted.

~Kathleen
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Old 12-17-2011, 10:11 PM   #172
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Wonder how many folks eat "peel and eat" shrimp? That little black dot on the end where the head was removed isn't pepper.
I'm one of them, an obsessive chef and maybe a bit of a germophobe. I obsessively clean my shrimp and slice out the entire digestive "thread" as I prepare my shrimp for cooking.

Yet I'm almost certain that restaurants don't do this at all. Nonetheless I order shrimp dishes at restaurants.

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and all this time i thought water chestnuts were in chinese dishes Because of their texture, their crunch. they sure don't have much flavor going for them, otherwise. i'd keep 'em--if for no other reason than to provide a counterpoint in those gummy, mushy chinese meals i've sometimes had on the cheap....
I add water chestnuts to my favorite Chinese and other Asian recipes, because I like the crunch they add. There's another taste they add when they are cooked, a taste I can't quite describe, and I like that too. Put them in a shishkabob and see what I mean.



A lot of people don't like organ meats, particularly liver, like beef/calf liver or chicken livers. I like them but many/most people don't. What's with that? Hunters from prehistoric times have favored heart/liver as one of the prime parts of the kill.. There must be a good reason for that.
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Old 12-17-2011, 10:26 PM   #173
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A lot of people don't like organ meats, particularly liver, like beef/calf liver or chicken livers. I like them but many/most people don't. What's with that? Hunters from prehistoric times have favored heart/liver as one of the prime parts of the kill.. There must be a good reason for that.
I read that it's thought (mostly from observation of modern "stone age" people) that those part were the hunters' privilege. They didn't travel or keep well, and they could cook up quickly right at the scene of the killing and dressing or could easily be eaten raw. Good for them, too.

I know that in the American West in the time of buffalo hunting, they were often cooked by being dropped momentarily in the coals and then eaten. For that matter, natives and the frontier hunters who interacted with them treated the intestines the same way, dragging them through fire and eating them. Enough people wrote of seeing a contest of one man starting from each end that it's certain to have happened. (A clever fellow could catch his opponent in mid gulp and jerk back to recover a foot or two of already eaten gut.)

The above is not so weird as it sounds. The herbivore gut is the carnivore's common source of vegetable matter. Greens were uncommon on the plains.
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Old 12-17-2011, 10:43 PM   #174
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Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
A lot of people don't like organ meats, particularly liver, like beef/calf liver or chicken livers. I like them but many/most people don't. What's with that? Hunters from prehistoric times have favored heart/liver as one of the prime parts of the kill.. There must be a good reason for that.
I love beef liver. I am anemic from childhood and learned to eat it at a very young age. But I do have to limit my intake because of the cholesterol. When ever I know I am going to have blood work done for my iron levels, I eat liver the day before.
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Old 12-17-2011, 11:03 PM   #175
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I read that it's thought (mostly from observation of modern "stone age" people) that those part were the hunters' privilege. They didn't travel or keep well, and they could cook up quickly right at the scene of the killing and dressing or could easily be eaten raw. Good for them, too.
That's a good point, that liver/heart cook quickly, and in fact they're very tender and succulent. I think that's why the hunters loved them, because if you're cooking the whole animal or most of it that the liver and heart are ready to eat sooner, and who more than the hunter deserves to eat first?

As chef I always enjoy tasting/snacking on what I'm cooking before it's done and ready to serve, and who more deserves an early taste? Same for the wine, gotta taste it to make sure it's right for the dish!

I don't like all that talk about intestines. Add that to the stuff I don't want to find on my plate! Okay maybe if it's home cooked sausages... (I just hope the chef cleaned the intestines really well.)

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I love beef liver. I am anemic from childhood and learned to eat it at a very young age. But I do have to limit my intake because of the cholesterol. When ever I know I am going to have blood work done for my iron levels, I eat liver the day before.
I can only wonder that most people forced to eat stuff ("learned") don't like it. You're lucky you escaped that. I enjoyed liver as a child before I ever heard that people didn't like it. (Same for lamb.)

I'm tempted to cook liver soon, and lots of onions with it! I'm not sure you can even have too much onions with liver. And ketchup! Maybe that sounds gross to some people but I like my liver with lots of onions and some ketchup.
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Old 12-17-2011, 11:17 PM   #176
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I love beef liver. I am anemic from childhood and learned to eat it at a very young age. But I do have to limit my intake because of the cholesterol. When ever I know I am going to have blood work done for my iron levels, I eat liver the day before.
If you wanted to avoid the Cholesterol, you could eat veggies seafood or herbs and seeds:

Dried Thyme contains the most with 124mg per 100g serving, or 687% of the RDA. That is 3.7mg (21% RDA) of iron per tablespoon of dried Thyme. It is followed by dried Parsley (11% RDA per Tblsp), dried Spearmint (10% RDA per Tblsp), Black Pepper, dried Marjoram, Cumin Seed, dried Dill, dried Oregano, Bay Leaf, dried Coriander, dried Basil, ground Tumeric, ground Savory, Anise Seed, Fenugreek Seed, dried Terragon, dried Chervil, and dried Rosemary (5% RDA per Tblsp).

For liver:

Liver is a vitamin rich food, and it is packed with iron. In the early 1900s liver was prescribed as a cure for anemia, and as a supplement for pregnant ladies. Duck liver (Foie Gras) provides the most iron with 30.5mg (170% RDA) per 100g serving, or 13.4mg (75% RDA) per liver. It is followed by pork liver which contains 17.9mg (100% RDA) or 15.2mg (85% RDA) in a 3 oz serving, chicken liver (72% RDA per 100g), turkey liver (67% RDA), lamb liver (57% RDA), and beef liver (36% RDA).


Clams, Oysters, and Mussels:
Shellfish can be eaten raw, baked, steamed, fried, or made into chowder. Clams provide the most iron with 28mg (155% RDA) per 100g serving, or about 27mg (150% RDA) in 10 small clams. Oysters provide 12mg (67% RDA) per 100g serving, or 5mg (28% RDA) in 6 medium sized oysters. Mussels provide 6.72mg (37% RDA) per 100g, or 5.7mg (32% RDA) in a 3oz serving.

Roasted Pumpkin and Squash Seeds:
A popular food in the Middle East and East Asia pumpkin and squash seeds contain about 15mg (83% RDA) of iron per 100g serving, 20.7mg (115% RDA) per cup, and 4.2mg (23% RDA) in a 1 ounce serving of about 142 seeds. If you can't find these in your local supermarket you will surely find them in Middle Eastern or East Asian specialty stores. Alternatively, you can also save any pumpkin and squash seeds you have and dry them yourself. The dried seeds contain more iron than roasted, so try to find dried if possible.

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Old 12-18-2011, 12:55 AM   #177
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Why bay scallops and not sea scallops? I don't think bay scallops have any flavor.
I imagine I think bay scallops are ok because they don't have as much flavor, and I don't care for the flavor of scallops lol. Bay scallops are much sweeter and more tender as well.

Is anyone a fan of liverwurst? I've never tried it, but my dad used to use it to feed his dog pills. It has a strong scent, and sometimes when I see it in the grocery store I have cravings for it. I like liver, but I'm not sure what you are supposed to do with liverwurst. Put it on crackers? On a sandwich?
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Old 12-18-2011, 01:08 AM   #178
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liverwurst is eaten as a sandwich, skittle. it's delicious.

i like it, sans pills , on rye bread with raw onion and spicy mustard.

livermush is something similar, sort of like liver scrapple. i like that fried with an egg on a hard roll.
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Old 12-18-2011, 01:36 AM   #179
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I could eat peel and eat shrimp every day of my life. The digestive tract doesnt bother me in the least.

I am also a big fan of liverwurst. Seeded rye bread and mustard. MMM MMM
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Old 12-18-2011, 02:02 AM   #180
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Love Liverwurst and Braunschweiger, in a sandwich, or on crackers. I've never had it on rye with mustard, but will now have to try it BT and Josh. I usually like it on white or wheat with, "waiting for the boos and hisses" Miracle Whip! Mayo just won't do ;-)
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