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Old 12-28-2011, 01:35 PM   #281
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
I grew up in the 50s. There was a lot of weird un-food passing for food. I didn't like (and still don't like) pink ice cream. It was called strawberry, but had nothing to do with strawberries. I enjoy ice cream made with actual strawberries.
Might well have been the ersatz "ice cream" I remember called Mellorine, with various animal and vegetable fats substituting for butterfat. Apparently it's still around. (I see WalWart carries it - surprise, surprise.) Today, it's soy oil, but I would guess that in the 50's lard was probably more like it. In a recent customs law case, it was ruled that Mellorine did not have to be charged dairy product duties because milk wasn't a major component. A far cry from ice cream, but you can fool the kids for a long time if you never give them the real thing.
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Old 12-28-2011, 04:52 PM   #282
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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
The only eel available in the U.P. is Lamprey eel. I understand that it is a prized delicacy in the U.K. but here, in the Great lakes, it is full of things like mercury, and all of the other nasties that can be found in top predatory fish. They are a parasite that suck the juices from the flesh of large lake trout, salmon, etc.
That sounds thoroughly unattractive to me. I presume that's on your "don't wanna see on my plate" category. Me too!


Beets... I just haven't ever cared for beets, although occasionally some sliced beets show up in my salad (at a restaurant) and I'll taste it a bit and see if I still don't like it. Hasn't happened yet but I have an open mind.

I'd rather eat a beet than an eel though.
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Old 12-28-2011, 05:34 PM   #283
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I have to agree. I don't care for beets as much as I don't care for cauliflower.

I think I'd rather eat eel. Actually, I have, as sushi.
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Old 12-28-2011, 06:22 PM   #284
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I think I could be convinced to eat eel provided it is prepared in a way that sounds attractive to me. (But not lamprey, that's a definite never going to happen.) I have heard that eels are very bony so if true it would have to be prepared in a way that addresses the bone problem. Other than that it seems that eels are just fish with a very long body plan, which doesn't much bother me.

I doubt I'd want raw eel though (not sure if it's eaten raw). I used to like raw sushi, sashimi, etc., but after talking to a friend recently about raw fish and parasites I've been a bit turned off, although I've been eating raw fish for many years, and often, and as far as I know I've never suffered any harm.

Speaking of sashimi, I have a local Korean owned market that sells the best grade flash frozen sushi tuna in approx. 10 oz. packages for about $12-$13, enough sashimi for two people to pig out. I bet the same amount would cost $40 in a restaurant. It seems ironic to me that a recipe with only one ingredient and no cooking costs so much in restaurants.

So I bet raw fish is something that LOTS of people don't want to see on their plate.
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Old 12-28-2011, 06:35 PM   #285
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The smoked eel we got was called Räucheraal. I lived near Bad Zwischenahn when I was an exchange student--many a Sunday we went there.

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I've eaten at that restaurant, but I didn't eat eel there!
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Old 12-28-2011, 09:21 PM   #286
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Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
I think I could be convinced to eat eel provided it is prepared in a way that sounds attractive to me. (But not lamprey, that's a definite never going to happen.) I have heard that eels are very bony so if true it would have to be prepared in a way that addresses the bone problem. Other than that it seems that eels are just fish with a very long body plan, which doesn't much bother me.

I doubt I'd want raw eel though (not sure if it's eaten raw). I used to like raw sushi, sashimi, etc., but after talking to a friend recently about raw fish and parasites I've been a bit turned off, although I've been eating raw fish for many years, and often, and as far as I know I've never suffered any harm.

Speaking of sashimi, I have a local Korean owned market that sells the best grade flash frozen sushi tuna in approx. 10 oz. packages for about $12-$13, enough sashimi for two people to pig out. I bet the same amount would cost $40 in a restaurant. It seems ironic to me that a recipe with only one ingredient and no cooking costs so much in restaurants.

So I bet raw fish is something that LOTS of people don't want to see on their plate.
parasites are easily controled with proper freezing. The FDA requires all fish that is destined to be sushi to be frozen in a manner and for a time span that eliminates parasites. Bacteria is controled by proper food handling when preparing the sushi.

You can figure that restaurant sushi fish goes for about $32 a pound, or $2 per/ounce. Each bite of nigiri is about one ounce of fish and can cost about $2-$4.
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Old 12-28-2011, 09:55 PM   #287
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Timothy, that was what I understood too, that freezing was a viable means of controlling parasites in raw fish. I had a few sentences in my tentative post before I edited them out because I realize that I'm no authority on the subject. Nonetheless I feel better after reading your reply. As I understand it the sushi grade tuna that I buy at my Korean market is flash frozen, and as long as it's kept frozen and then thawed in a reasonable way then it's safe to eat. I have no control over Japanese restaurants I dine at but I presume they follow reasonable precautions, particularly here in Los Angeles where we have a large Asian population and where Asian restaurants (and markets) are very popular and have a high rate of turnover. This is IMO one of the very nice things about living in Los Angeles, that we have such a large variety of Asian food. (I'm not Asian but it's probably my favorite food, I just can't get enough of it.)

I see from your signature that you're a fellow sushi enthusiast. I'll admit sometimes I can be influenced negatively but when I'm not thinking about the details of how the food gets on the plate I'm pretty enthusiastic about sushi and sashimi. I'm very involved in that I've made my own sushi. I've had mixed results with nigiri but very good results with rolls, and of course with my one-ingredient no-cooking sashimi.

My enthusiasm may sometimes waver but I hope some time soon I'll get back to this, and hope I'll post some recipes and pictures of my own nigiri, rolls and sashimi.

Even for people who don't like the idea of raw fish there is always the California roll, very tasty, no reason to object for those who don't like the idea of eating raw fish, and very easy to prepare!

Price is still a concern for many of us, and very expensive to eat a sushi dinner at a restaurant. That's one of my favorite reasons to cook my own stuff (or in the case of raw stuff, to prepare), not only because I enjoy learning how to put it together and then do it, but also because it's so much more economical to cook your own food at home rather than dining in an expensive restaurant. And of course I enjoy feeding people, which I presume is something that practically everybody on this forum enjoys. Nothing better than cooking food you enjoy and feeding it to friends and family and seeing them enjoy it!

But one thing for sure, I'll never gain a preference for exotic food until I've tried and enjoyed it at a restaurant. There's the chance to have anything you want expertly prepared, and decide if you like eating it, and then you make your own cooking attempts you have a yardstick to measure your own performance.
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Old 12-28-2011, 10:18 PM   #288
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Hey Greg, yeah, I"m a sushi addict! I spoke with the fish guy at my local market and he told me that all of his fish is flash frozen at minus 70F for 24 hours prior to being shipped to him from his supplier. That's plenty cold enough to kill any parasites that might be in the meat.

I own my own sushi freezer. Meat can be frozen at minus 4F for 7 days and that will also rid it of parasites. My freezer maintains minus 20F, so I"m good.

With fish from a market, bacteria is more of a worry than parasites. Any meat I buy from the market is prepared as per/instruction from a sushi chef; Each side of he fish is cut away to a depth of a quarter inch. That meat is trashed or cooked. The inside meat is bacteria free then.
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Old 12-28-2011, 10:55 PM   #289
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Good Timothy, yeah, that -70F 24 hour guideline is what I read a few years ago when I researched it on the Internet. I have no way of verifying my tuna is done that way but as I said we have a very active (extremely active) Asian community in Los Angeles, and sushi is very popular with our Japanese and Koreans (and maybe other Asians too), so I'm very fortunate to live near a huge variety of restaurants that serve sushi but also have good access to Asian markets. I think you would agree with me that nobody should visit their favorite chain market (Ralphs, Albertson's, Kroeger's, Vons, Gelsons in Los Angeles and some of them probably nationally) and buy fish at their fish counter counter and expect to eat it raw. That stuff is often very good when you intend to cook it, but IMO you must buy fish that is specifically intended to be served raw, or take your chances, particularly with the bacteria.

I don't know what your Asian community is like in Florida but it's obvious that you have huge access to a wide variety of very fresh fish, which is probably one of the great reasons to live in Florida. I suspect that those of us who live near the coasts probably have better access to seafood, and probably more encouragement and exposure to seafood both cooked and raw.

Which gets back to the topic, what don't you want to see on your plate? I bet we coastals probably have less objection and more preference to see seafood on our plates!
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Old 12-28-2011, 11:21 PM   #290
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Which gets back to the topic, what don't you want to see on your plate? I bet we coastals probably have less objection and more preference to see seafood on our plates!
Only because we Mountain Goats can't get the freshest seafood.
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