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Old 12-30-2011, 10:54 AM   #351
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For me the worst is liver...liver of any variety. It smells absolutely delicious when it's being cooked. You get all set to eat a fabulous meal and then, well... once it's in your mouth the texture is abhorrent. It defies description.
What a shame. Beef liver is pretty tough, but calves liver, if cooked to a medium rare, is as tender and flavorful as veal.

Get yourself some beef calves liver and cook it for just a couple minutes on one side and then one or two minutes on the second side. It should still be slightly pink in the middle and should also be very tender.
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Old 12-30-2011, 11:58 AM   #352
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Originally Posted by joesfolk View Post
For me the worst is liver...liver of any variety. It smells absolutely delicious when it's being cooked. You get all set to eat a fabulous meal and then, well... once it's in your mouth the texture is abhorrent. It defies description.
It's sort of chewy on the outside and the middle is so tender that it kind of melts as you chew. I like this but I think I can understand why somebody might not like liver and might associate this with "yuckiness."
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Old 12-30-2011, 02:11 PM   #353
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I remember seeing a travel show once about places in the french countryside where people would go out after a long rainfall to collect dozens of snails from their walkways and around their yards. then they'd cook them up for dinner.

the pastoral beauty of their homes and gardens were such that it seemed like a natural thing to do, so i wouldn't have any problem eating their little slugs. but i don't think i could do the same thing in my own yard.
Probably best not to take an edited cooking show too literally. Wild snails, even the edible kind, can be anywhere from nasty to poisonous until processed by starving and then salting to force them to purge. And what they eat has a lot to do with flavor.

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I've heard that rattlesnake tastes like chicken too. Um, rattlesnake is also something I don't want to see on my plate, live or cooked, although I'd rather have cooked than live if that was the only choice.
It's really a mild flavor and all white meat. When I was growing up, I spent many summers with grandparents in Sweetwater, Texas, where they have one of the oldest and largest rattlesnake roundups. But it's close to white chicken meat when fried. Makes a good gumbo, too. I've only eaten them in the spring, when they're flushed out of their winter dens, and most have fasted over the winter. I don't know if the taste is different later in the year. I'd say that they're one of the easiest beasties to skin and dress. You really need large snakes to get much meat. The 3-4 foot rattlers in my yard aren't worth it.
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Old 12-30-2011, 02:30 PM   #354
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I'm not afraid of rattlesnakes as long as they're kept at a proper and safe distance. Last time I encountered one (camping, curled up under my car) I took pictures and watched it for a while until finally encouraging it with a stick to leave my campsite.

But I just don't think of them as food. If I want something that tastes like chicken I'm perfectly happy with chicken.

I don't want to see reptiles on my plate!
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Old 12-30-2011, 02:50 PM   #355
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Probably best not to take an edited cooking show too literally. Wild snails, even the edible kind, can be anywhere from nasty to poisonous until processed by starving and then salting to force them to purge. And what they eat has a lot to do with flavor.

It's really a mild flavor and all white meat. When I was growing up, I spent many summers with grandparents in Sweetwater, Texas, where they have one of the oldest and largest rattlesnake roundups. But it's close to white chicken meat when fried. Makes a good gumbo, too. I've only eaten them in the spring, when they're flushed out of their winter dens, and most have fasted over the winter. I don't know if the taste is different later in the year. I'd say that they're one of the easiest beasties to skin and dress. You really need large snakes to get much meat. The 3-4 foot rattlers in my yard aren't worth it.
My son used to capture live rattlers and turn them in for the $5.00 bounty. It was his 'go to the movies' money.
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Old 12-30-2011, 03:01 PM   #356
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When I was a kid, on camping trips I used to catch garter snakes and sell them to the pet store when I got home, maybe a buck or two each. Garter snakes bite too but not hard enough to cause much harm.

I don't want to see garter snakes on my plate either!
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Old 12-30-2011, 04:49 PM   #357
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Originally Posted by GLC View Post
Probably best not to take an edited cooking show too literally. Wild snails, even the edible kind, can be anywhere from nasty to poisonous until processed by starving and then salting to force them to purge. And what they eat has a lot to do with flavor.

.
hmm, i'd learned in survival training years ago that slug, worms, and freshwater snails were safe to eat. you just had to be careful not to eat bugs that had hair on them. those were more likely to be poisonous. i'll have to look up how snails are prepared for consumption.
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Old 12-30-2011, 05:02 PM   #358
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hmm, i'd learned in survival training years ago that slug, worms, and freshwater snails were safe to eat. you just had to be careful not to eat bugs that had hair on them. those were more likely to be poisonous. i'll have to look up how snails are prepared for consumption.
Here's a paper with that information in it:
Raising Snails
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Old 12-30-2011, 06:26 PM   #359
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First of all I want to say hello. This is my first post
Squid..yuch. Not because of the taste because I never tasted it. I just can't get past what it looks like**shudder**
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Old 12-30-2011, 06:29 PM   #360
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What a shame. Beef liver is pretty tough, but calves liver, if cooked to a medium rare, is as tender and flavorful as veal.

Get yourself some beef calves liver and cook it for just a couple minutes on one side and then one or two minutes on the second side. It should still be slightly pink in the middle and should also be very tender.

I only eat beef liver and I cook it well done and it is fork tender.
I season with salt and pepper and lightly flour. Pan fry in canola oil. I remove from pan and fry onion rings. As they start to soften I place the liver on top, add a little water and put on the lid. Simmer until done, sturing the onions every 5 minutes or so.
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